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Lack of genetics/inheritance in EK Bio

Discussion in 'MCAT: Medical College Admissions Test' started by engineeredout, Jun 14, 2008.

  1. engineeredout

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    I'm going through the EK bio book and realized that there isn't anything on inheritance/genes like X crossed with Y, how many offspring have trait C etc... Is the lack of this because it wont be asked on the mCAT, or would I be well advised to find an outside source of information to study the topic (I haven't taken bio yet). If so, any suggestions?

    Thanks.
     
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  2. Nikki2002

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    Recent trends show that the BS section is putting much more emphasis on genetics.

    I think it would be wise for you to get a genetics review book and study that or perhaps take a genetics course if you have time before the mcat.

    This is a big weakness in review books that are on the market now, imo. Not nearly enough genetics review.
     
  3. bluemonkey

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    I second what Nikki2002 said. I would strongly recommend grabbing some genetics review to supplement your EK material. It seems as though most of the OChem that has been removed from the MCAT over the past years has been replaced with classical and molecular genetics.
     
  4. dreams

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    does anyone know where I can get a good review book for genetics?? I have not had the course but i have the EK bio book but I am worried that it will not be enough so i am looking for another source for this anyone have any ideas???
     
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  5. Just Joshin

    Just Joshin New Member
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    So you haven't taken any Bio yet and you're sitting for the MCAT? That's a H U G E mistake!!!
     
  6. AsuKa

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    he said he hasnt taken genetics, not any bio course

    :p
     
  7. cwfergus

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    .
     
  8. tncekm

    tncekm MS-1
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    EK was insufficient for what I saw in the BS section of the 6/13, 2:00PM test. However, what I saw in the back of the 2008 Kaplan Premier book was sufficient. Just keep in mind the MCAT is going to bring it at you in a scary way, but it's generally an easy question. I.e. there was one genetics question (sex linked) on my test date that looked hideous if you just looked at the passage, the chart, etc, but it really was simple once you got through the scary appearance of it all.
     
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  9. cateyezz

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    i have realized after so much practice that everytime u look at a passage and the questions related to it...if they do not expect u to derive the answer from some basic concept, then the answer has to be in the passage, thats why its given to u...it mite b in the charts or in the info given, but its there....now as for ur genetics...EK gen section is def. not enuff....i'd suggest going over some probability and stat genetics from a basic genetics book...look at mendelian ratios and deviation from mendelian ratios etc. and those crosses and stuff....besides that u shud b fine...
     
  10. tncekm

    tncekm MS-1
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    Yes, agreed. And knowing the 3:1 and 9:3:3:1 isn't enough. You need to know that, in the case of 3:1, that 1:2:1 is the actual genotypic ratio (see Punnet square). Understand what can happen to the observed phenotypic ratio if one of the three genotypes is terminal or abnormally expressed, etc, etc, etc.
     
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  11. engineeredout

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    Are there any review books that cover all of this but have separate subjects? IE I don't want to buy the whole kaplan book since I definitely don't need more physics/chem content review.
     
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  12. nityking

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    umm.. I've taken Genetics course in college and the level of detail they go into is unnecessary for MCAT. However, it would be a definite advantage for MCATers to know Mendellian Genetics (tricky stuff like 2/3 heterozygous ratio for recessive lethal traits), Sex-Linked Inheritance, Codominance (Blood typing), Penetrance, Epistasis, Polygentic Inheritcance, Recombination frequencies, and most importantly - PEDIGREE PROBLEMS that use lotta concepts, analytical skills and basic probability math (AND / OR problems).
     
  13. Suaveness

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    As everyone has said, you really do need to find a way to get ahold of some problems. I was using the Kaplan materials, and they didn't have very many of these problems either. You should get a genetics book or go online and try to find some problems somewhere.
     
  14. Isoprop

    Isoprop Fascinating, tell me more
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    a professor recommended this book to me:

    primer of genetic analysis by thompson et al

    i perused through the second edition in his office. there's 1 chapter devoted to mendelian genetics and 1 chapter devoted to pedigree analysis. there are other chapters that are worth reading like mitosis, DNA transcription/translation, and sex linkage.

    the book is problem-based, which is really nice. it looks really handy but goes beyond the scope of the mcat pretty fast. you will only need a few chapters from this book, so try to see if you can score one at the library before shelling out 40 bucks. if you're going to buy instead of borrow, the second edition (1997) used on amazon is only ~12 bucks with shipping. i doubt they did any improvements in the third edition as far as mendelian genetics and pedigrees.

    edit: link to second edition used on amazon
     
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  15. Atlas80

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  16. dr seuss

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    EK doesn't have much on genetics but the Kaplan book has a chapter on classical genetics and one on molecular genetics.

    When I was first reading this thread I thought about recommending it. It would be good for someone without much biology because it provides so much practice. I don't really think it is really needed for most people but it might help the OP.

    ps: take my advice with a grain of salt--I haven't taken the MCAT yet and just started studying like a week ago
     
    #16 dr seuss, Jun 17, 2008
    Last edited: Jul 2, 2008
  17. engineeredout

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    All right I'll trust you guys. Just ordered the 2nd edition for $11.69.

    On a somewhat related note, I found an old exam for the cell bio class I'm taking next semester. Got a 72/100 on it from just what I've learned from studying mcat :hardy::hardy:.

    The majority of the problems I got wrong were... you guessed it, genetics. I figure at the very least this will give me an edge in class next semester.
     
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  18. Isoprop

    Isoprop Fascinating, tell me more
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    i've read through both editions of the book, and there's very little difference between the two. the book is superb! after a few hours, i've gotten the pedigree and mendelian ratios down cold.

    just a caveat: the book doesn't teach the concepts; rather, it gives you some helpful hints in the beginning of each chapter and presents a lot of problems. so if you've never been introduced to genetics concepts, i suggest going through a textbook first before taking on the book.
     
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  19. engineeredout

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    Can you tell me what sections of the book I should know for the mcat and which sections are just too much detail?
     
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  20. studiddy

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  21. ldnk

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    Go to your local University/college and borrow the textbook used for either your 1st year Bio/Genetics course. It will give you more than enough problems to work with and most of them will be harder than any you find on an MCAT anyway.

    Mendelian genetics hasn't changed and as such, textbooks on the topic have been the same for ages.
     
  22. TheBoondocks

    TheBoondocks StreetFighter 4 Virtuoso
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    yes, I am using it right to supplement my genetics class. It is really great. It covers both mendelian and molecular genetics so you will be covered.
     
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  23. lastcall

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    Hi Boondocks, which supplement book are you referring to? (i.e. Thompson et al book or Schaum's outline?)
     
  24. engineeredout

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    I just got the book. One of my majors is in statistics so when I saw a chapter on Chi-squared distribution I almost cried it was so beautiful.

    I'll ask again, anyone know what sections in this book are actually required for the mcat? Hell I wish I didn't have to study for the mcat cause I'd just study this book and then take a full genetics course.
     
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  25. dr seuss

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    1-7, 13,14, 16-19, and 21 might be helpful. Use common sense when you are going through it, if something seems obscure it probably won't be needed. For example, chapter 2 has the substages of prophase I of meiosis but it's not needed for the MCAT.
     
  26. StarStup

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    I just got my Schaums book today!
     
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  27. studiddy

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    I read 1-, 12, and 13 in Schaum's, or at least parts of each, and there is some pretty good review stuff in there, IMO, though (I'm guessing) the genetics proper can quickly get outside of MCAT range. It's worth the $12 or asking price I'd say, and I plan to read the whole thing later.
     

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