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Hi. For people in med school, did you find it necessary to have a laptop while in med school? Did you find it useful? Are all med course material on the internet or do they provide handouts?

Is there any specs for a laptop that med schools require? For example I found this for U of Ottawa: http://www.medicine.uottawa.ca/medte...uirements.html

Where can I find the laptop specs requirement for U of Toronto and Queen's med school?
 

ensuii

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Hi. For people in med school, did you find it necessary to have a laptop while in med school? Did you find it useful? Are all med course material on the internet or do they provide handouts?

Is there any specs for a laptop that med schools require? For example I found this for U of Ottawa: http://www.medicine.uottawa.ca/medte...uirements.html

Where can I find the laptop specs requirement for U of Toronto and Queen's med school?

I think in general you pretty much NEED to have a laptop for med school...you need them for class notes, some schools have you do exams on them, etc.. In terms of general requirements, you won't need anything specific and can probably skimp a lot. If you have a laptop that works and you like using, you're fine. If you're looking for a new laptop, I'd would try to get a laptop with:

-Dual core (stay away from sempron or centrino), at least 2megs L2 cache
-2 gigs of RAM
-120gig HD

Anything else (such as DVD players) is up to you and probably won't matter too much. If you want, you can shop around for a laptop and send me a PM for advice. www.newegg.com has been a favorite for a lot of tech people for a while.
 

Omni

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When you look for a laptop, make sure it has AWESOME battery life. And by that, I mean get a laptop that will give you AT LEAST 5 hours of battery per single charge. Go for 8, if you can. It's annoying and a pain in the neck to be carrying a charger, and then finding a spot to plug in the charger, which takes away a lot of your freedom and mobility, in a sense.
Also, don't bank for laptops that have dedicated graphics card, as they will cause your laptop to produce more heat. The Lenovo X series is a good line of laptops to look at (X300, X200). All offer at least 7-8 hours of battery
 

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On a similar note, do people recommend a desktop as well? Or is a laptop enough?
 

Mattabet

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On a similar note, do people recommend a desktop as well? Or is a laptop enough?
You won't need both. However, if you're a little bit neurotic like I am, you might want to get an external hard drive to back your files up with. An old desktop works great for that as well. Just in case...
 

URHere

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Check with your school before you go out and buy a laptop specifically for that purpose.

My school, for example, provides our syllabi in paper form. They also have computers on campus with Microsoft software, free printing, etc. I have never once used my computer for med school purposes and I know I would have been annoyed if I bought a new one for no reason.
 

armybound

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Our syllabi are also paper, so I don't plan on using a laptop in class much. I bought a Lenovo netbook with a 6-cell battery. It gets ~6-7 hours of battery life while surfing, has a 140gb hard drive, and can run most basic programs.

I also have a desktop that I will use if I need to do anything requiring more serious proceessing power.
 

ensuii

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Personally, I HATEEEEE laptops. I have a dell inspiron 1501 that I got for 350 when my parents bought a lot of computers for the business but I never use it outside of school/business. They're just a huge waste of money! Here's probably the most valuable piece of advice when it comes to buying a laptop: in terms of how computer technology is developed, the average computing power (ram timing/speed, processor strength, hd size, etc) is less in laptop than what you would find for desktops (since it takes additional time to adapt technology for space/mobility constraints that you have with laptops). Meaning, when you buy a laptop, in a sense you are buying inferior technology. Further, in terms of innovation, most R&D is oriented towards making slimmer computers that run cooler and longer meaning that the gap in technology gets larger and larger. In my opinion, because laptops generally have shorter lifespans than desktops in terms of durability and quality, spending more money than you have to for a laptop is a complete waste of money. Shoot for something that you can get for less than $700. If you're paying substantially more (like you would for a macbook or any apple product) you're really only paying for sex appeal.

If you want a strong that will last, build yourself a desktop. It's really easy now a days and it comes down to plugging things into similar sizes holes. Moreover, when it comes to upgrade, if you build a desktop yourself or get a computer from a company that doesn't modify it's technology like HP and Dell, you can just interchange parts instead of buying a brand new computer. Just imo.
 

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Personally, I HATEEEEE laptops. I have a dell inspiron 1501 that I got for 350 when my parents bought a lot of computers for the business but I never use it outside of school/business. They're just a huge waste of money! Here's probably the most valuable piece of advice when it comes to buying a laptop: in terms of how computer technology is developed, the average computing power (ram timing/speed, processor strength, hd size, etc) is less in laptop than what you would find for desktops (since it takes additional time to adapt technology for space/mobility constraints that you have with laptops). Meaning, when you buy a laptop, in a sense you are buying inferior technology. Further, in terms of innovation, most R&D is oriented towards making slimmer computers that run cooler and longer meaning that the gap in technology gets larger and larger. In my opinion, because laptops generally have shorter lifespans than desktops in terms of durability and quality, spending more money than you have to for a laptop is a complete waste of money. Shoot for something that you can get for less than $700. If you're paying substantially more (like you would for a macbook or any apple product) you're really only paying for sex appeal.

If you want a strong that will last, build yourself a desktop. It's really easy now a days and it comes down to plugging things into similar sizes holes. Moreover, when it comes to upgrade, if you build a desktop yourself or get a computer from a company that doesn't modify it's technology like HP and Dell, you can just interchange parts instead of buying a brand new computer. Just imo.
This is potentially bad advice. At my school, a lot of classes will distribute powerpoints and it only makes sense to write notes in the notes space during the lecture. Most people do this as opposed to printing out the slides and writing all over them. Even our syllabi are not appropriate for note taking as they are written in paragraph format as opposed to bullet points.

I'd find out how your school distributes material and what most students in class do. I'd hate to invest in a desktop only to find out that it's useless. Plus, with the amount that you'll be studying, it's nice to have a change of scenery once in a while. This is a lot more inconvenient if you have a desktop.

Who cares if your desktop is more powerful when it's at home and you need something to complete assignments in class.

I'd also argue for getting something durable. I bought a Dell Inspiron last year and the thing is falling apart. It "computes" fine, but the mouse broke, the cover is cracked, and the hinge is broken.
 
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ensuii

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This is potentially bad advice. At my school, a lot of classes will distribute powerpoints and it only makes sense to write notes in the notes space during the lecture. Most people do this as opposed to printing out the slides and writing all over them. Even our syllabi are not appropriate for note taking as they are written in paragraph format as opposed to bullet points.

I'd find out how your school distributes material and what most students in class do. I'd hate to invest in a desktop only to find out that it's useless. Plus, with the amount that you'll be studying, it's nice to have a change of scenery once in a while. This is a lot more inconvenient if you have a desktop.
I'm not saying don't get a laptop. I'm saying don't spend a lot of money on one.
 

chiz2kul

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Personally, I HATEEEEE laptops. I have a dell inspiron 1501 that I got for 350 when my parents bought a lot of computers for the business but I never use it outside of school/business. They're just a huge waste of money! Here's probably the most valuable piece of advice when it comes to buying a laptop: in terms of how computer technology is developed, the average computing power (ram timing/speed, processor strength, hd size, etc) is less in laptop than what you would find for desktops (since it takes additional time to adapt technology for space/mobility constraints that you have with laptops). Meaning, when you buy a laptop, in a sense you are buying inferior technology. Further, in terms of innovation, most R&D is oriented towards making slimmer computers that run cooler and longer meaning that the gap in technology gets larger and larger. In my opinion, because laptops generally have shorter lifespans than desktops in terms of durability and quality, spending more money than you have to for a laptop is a complete waste of money. Shoot for something that you can get for less than $700. If you're paying substantially more (like you would for a macbook or any apple product) you're really only paying for sex appeal.

If you want a strong that will last, build yourself a desktop. It's really easy now a days and it comes down to plugging things into similar sizes holes. Moreover, when it comes to upgrade, if you build a desktop yourself or get a computer from a company that doesn't modify it's technology like HP and Dell, you can just interchange parts instead of buying a brand new computer. Just imo.
Mobility
 

ensuii

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Just offering my advice. Mobility is fine but not worth paying more than $700 for. Just imo, anyone's free to spend their fancy on a shiny computer if it suits them
 

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I'm not saying don't get a laptop. I'm saying don't spend a lot of money on one.
Kinda depends on the computer. Some business-class computers cost more, but are far more durable than other laptops. For instance, a Lenovo Thinkpad is built like a brick. Your everyday Dell Inspiron is not. Paying more for the Lenovo will result in a significantly more durable product.

I actually believe the Macbook Pro is worth the extra money. I have one at work and it's a solid machine.
 

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Kinda depends on the computer. Some business-class computers cost more, but are far more durable than other laptops. For instance, a Lenovo Thinkpad is built like a brick. Your everyday Dell Inspiron is not. Paying more for the Lenovo will result in a significantly more durable product.

I actually believe the Macbook Pro is worth the extra money. I have one at work and it's a solid machine.
Yea, I went to Best Buy the other day just to see the physical differences and nothing was as solid as the MacBook Pro. There weren't any Lenovos to compare, but HP, Dell, Toshiba, and Sony Vaio had nothing even close. Everything was plastic parts that flex.
 

ensuii

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Kinda depends on the computer. Some business-class computers cost more, but are far more durable than other laptops. For instance, a Lenovo Thinkpad is built like a brick. Your everyday Dell Inspiron is not. Paying more for the Lenovo will result in a significantly more durable product.

I actually believe the Macbook Pro is worth the extra money. I have one at work and it's a solid machine.
Sorry, when I say durability, I'm not really talking about durability of the exterior like the case cracking, hinges getting loose, etc., I'm referring to disk errors and general hardware failure. I should've been been more specific. The Mac/PC issue is one a lot of people are passionate about, but personally, the only justification I can see for paying for a machine that isn't really heads-and-shoulders above the competition is sex appeal. Don't get me wrong, macs are sexy (MILF?) but I can't believe people actually buy them.
 

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Sorry, when I say durability, I'm not really talking about durability of the exterior like the case cracking, hinges getting loose, etc., I'm referring to disk errors and general hardware failure. I should've been been more specific. The Mac/PC issue is one a lot of people are passionate about, but personally, the only justification I can see for paying for a machine that isn't really heads-and-shoulders above the competition is sex appeal. Don't get me wrong, macs are sexy (MILF?) but I can't believe people actually buy them.
Well, I think exterior durability isn't something to scoff at either. I wish I hadn't. I baby my computer and it's one step away from imploding at one year old. My problems aren't all cosmetic; the track pad and keyboard don't function properly. Those are two pretty important things when you're trying to input notes and get stuff done quickly. If I have to drag around an extra keyboard and a mouse, what use is a laptop?
 

ensuii

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Well, I think exterior durability isn't something to scoff at either. I wish I hadn't. I baby my computer and it's one step away from imploding at one year old. My problems aren't all cosmetic; the track pad and keyboard don't function properly.
True dat. I think the only Mac I'd consider getting is the Air because it is soooooooooooooooooooooooo gorgeous :love:. I think I'd hate myself forever tho :-(
 

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ive a vaio that's lasted me 3 years and it's in excellent working order. BUT you really do have to be careful with it because it's mostly plastic frame (cover is very durable because it's carbon). I have one crack on my frame-it's pretty minor but very annoying.
 

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-Dual core (stay away from sempron or centrino)
Sempron is a chip line, Centrino is a platform. Two different things. While I agree that it makes little to no sense to go with AMD at this point (even Turion level chips), telling people to stay away from Centrino is going to turn people who don't know the difference away from Intel's Core line, which would be a potentially huge mistake.
 
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I've had a HP Pavilion dv5000 for 3 years now and I've had no problems. And yeah what's wrong with Centrino? I got an intel Centrino Duo processor.
 

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You may want to consider a slate/tablet PC for in-class note taking. At my school there a lot of different resources with various issues like black/white syllabi, powerpoints that the profs update at the last second, and various internet-based things. A tablet PC gives you everything in one location..and that location can become STARBUCKS whenever you want.
 

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in addition to thinkpads, which are solid, most major companies have a business line of laptops that are more solid than their consumer models (in fact, the thinkpad is lenovo's business line, but they also sell some cheaper models that I'd never buy). I have a Dell Latitude D630 which I've had for a year and a half. Latitudes are much more solid than the inspiron line (although the keyboard takes getting used to, but is fine after a week or two). I know HP and other companies also have business computers which I've heard are good.

My favorite thing about my laptop is battery life. I spent a little extra money and got a 9-cell battery instead of the standard 6-cell battery. With the wireless card turned off and with the screen brightness turned all the way down, the battery can last about 6.5 hrs. With wireless turned on, it's 5.5 hrs. The frustrating thing about batteries though is that they will eventually lose their ability to hold charge and your battery life will diminish. Fortunately, after a year and a half, mine is still fine. The other day, I was skimming the dell website and noticed that they now offer a large extra battery that fits into the bottom of the computer in the dock port (you know, that little 4 inch long port on the bottom of your computer that you can use to plug your computer into a peripherals dock to expand functionality). They were saying that, if you used a 9-cell battery plus an optional bay battery (you take out your DVD drive and slide in a small battery in its place) plus the large dock battery, you can get something like 24 hrs of battery life. Personally, I think that's a bit excessive, but it's cool nonetheless, and is great for those long international flights (not that you'll be going on that many of them during med school, but still).
 

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I don't know if other medical schools are like UNC, but the medical students told me they require you to buy the one they have chosen.
 

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I don't know if other medical schools are like UNC, but the medical students told me they require you to buy the one they have chosen.
U. Maryland does that as well, except that I believe they tack the cost of the computer onto your tuition bill. Sadly, the free (for MD/PhDs) laptop was a factor when I was choosing a school...
 

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I have a macbook pro that i got in february and am also getting a netbook to take to class with me... though i really do prefer to hand write notes.
 

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Get a 13" Macbook Pro if you want the most bang for your buck. They're durable (both externally and internally) like a Thinkpad, have an 8 hour battery, they're quite gorgeous, and OSX is a far superior OS to Windows.

If you're not into Macs, go with Lenovo's Thinkpad series. I have a Thinkpad and I love it... however it's a bit pricey. Definitely worth the extra money though. You're not just buying faster parts, but better made parts that will last you years more than an Inspiron with its cheap parts.

The first time I bought a laptop for school, I made the mistake of going for the cheapest computer with reasonable specs (*cough Dell Inspiron *cough). While you may be saving a few hundred in the short term, you'll be losing quite a bit more when you have to buy a new computer after 2 years due to subpar components. Get a computer that will last you all four years of medical school... which means coughing up a bit more dough.
 
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nick_carraway

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Why does everyone on SDN love ThinkPads without mentioning IdeaPads? You'd think the aesthetics would sway some. Is there something I don't know?
 

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I also recommend Lenovo. I'm using a T60p that, with the exception of replacing the fan, has been problem-free and performs exactly like it did when I got it out of the box, and it just reached its two year birthday.

Of course, having a parent that works at IBM and entitles you to the glorious employee discount definitely helped me in this decision.
 

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Why does everyone on SDN love ThinkPads without mentioning IdeaPads? You'd think the aesthetics would sway some. Is there something I don't know?
Thinkpads are widely considered to be the highest build quality laptops in the business class. I had a Thinkpad T42 for 5 years and never had an issue with the build quality. No cracked hinges, no worn paint, no cracked shells. Plastic casings are prone to cracking either with impact or just over time. The thinkpads (at least mine) are a magnesium alloy.

The Ideapad is a laptop line that Lenovo came out with after they purchased the PC division from IBM. It's a consumer laptop so it looks a little better and is cheaper but doesn't offer the same build quality or warranty.

I personally like the no-frills Thinkpad aesthetics too. Laptops these days are too shiny, both in casing and the matte screens.

A Macbook Pro would be my alternative to a Thinkpad; their build quality and support is excellent. Those machines also just look fun to use.
 

nick_carraway

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Thinkpads are widely considered to be the highest build quality laptops in the business class. I had a Thinkpad T42 for 5 years and never had an issue with the build quality. No cracked hinges, no worn paint, no cracked shells. Plastic casings are prone to cracking either with impact or just over time. The thinkpads (at least mine) are a magnesium alloy.

The Ideapad is a laptop line that Lenovo came out with after they purchased the PC division from IBM. It's a consumer laptop so it looks a little better and is cheaper but doesn't offer the same build quality or warranty.

I personally like the no-frills Thinkpad aesthetics too. Laptops these days are too shiny, both in casing and the matte screens.

A Macbook Pro would be my alternative to a Thinkpad; their build quality and support is excellent. Those machines also just look fun to use.
Yeah I know why corporations use ThinkPads and can see their appeal as rugged machines, but I just wouldn't have expected so many young consumers to go for them on SDN. You'd think someone would say Lenovo and that people would go to buy the IdeaPad instead.
 

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Yeah I know why corporations use ThinkPads and can see their appeal as rugged machines, but I just wouldn't have expected so many young consumers to go for them on SDN. You'd think someone would say Lenovo and that people would go to buy the IdeaPad instead.
The Thinkpad is the first thing people think of when Lenovo is brought up. There's nothing particularly special about an Ideapad. You may as well buy a Dell or HP. The build quality of the Thinkpad line doesn't carry over the Ideapads.

And for the demographics on SDN, a rugged machine is pretty darn important. I expect to carry my laptop with me every day between home, class and the library.
 

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I have had a thinkpad t43 for just about four years. the unthinkable happened about 2 months ago - one of my screen hinges cracked. otherwise it's the most durable computer I've owned.
 

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Yeah I know why corporations use ThinkPads and can see their appeal as rugged machines, but I just wouldn't have expected so many young consumers to go for them on SDN. You'd think someone would say Lenovo and that people would go to buy the IdeaPad instead.
IdeaPads are poorman's version of the Thinkpad...u can buy a really good Thinkpad for around 700-800 bucks now. ideapads are around 500-600...the extra 200 bucks is definitely worth it (most Thinkpads last more than 5 years). my friend owned a Thinkpad for 10 years+
 
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Hey... anyone considering getting a tablet/convertible?

I kind of want one for the ability to draw/handwrite out notes... but the last one I had was a Fujitsu Lifebook... excellent size and portability; really poor battery life and I found the touchscreen actually did not work that well.

This time if I get one, I'd want a true tablet. Hopefully something with better battery life, doesn't get too hot (my Fujitsu is kaput now).

Any recs? Anyone else thinking of getting one?
 
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Hey... anyone considering getting a tablet/convertible?

I kind of want one for the ability to draw/handwrite out notes... but the last one I had was a Fujitsu Lifebook... excellent size and portability; really poor battery life and I found the touchscreen actually did not work that well.

This time if I get one, I'd want a true tablet. Hopefully something with better battery life, doesn't get too hot (my Fujitsu is kaput now).

Any recs? Anyone else thinking of getting one?

I got a Thinkpad x61 convertible tablet. The build quality is fantastic (as its a thinkpad), and the touchscreen works flawlessly. Combined with OneNote it is the ultimate notetaking machine. Also, because I got it as they were phasing the model out (for the newer, widescreen x200 tablet), I got mine on clearance for $650, which is a ridiculous deal for a tablet. Battery life is pretty good at around 5-6 hours, and the keyboard is unbeatable. The only downsides are you have to like the trackpoint nub, as theres no touchpad, and theres no DVD player, meaning if you want to use DVD media you need an external.

I also would like to promote the idea of using a Desktop plus cheap laptop instead of a nice laptop. I built a desktop with overclocked 3 GHZ quad core CPU and a top of the line GPU for $550. So for less money then the cheapest macbook pro (not knocking macs, I used to own and love one, but they are a bit pricey) I have an extremely powerful gaming/video editing/rendering rig and a great laptop. You could also go the desktop + netbook strategy if you dont mind the small keyboards.
 

nick_carraway

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I got a Thinkpad x61 convertible tablet. The build quality is fantastic (as its a thinkpad), and the touchscreen works flawlessly. Combined with OneNote it is the ultimate notetaking machine. Also, because I got it as they were phasing the model out (for the newer, widescreen x200 tablet), I got mine on clearance for $650, which is a ridiculous deal for a tablet. Battery life is pretty good at around 5-6 hours, and the keyboard is unbeatable. The only downsides are you have to like the trackpoint nub, as theres no touchpad, and theres no DVD player, meaning if you want to use DVD media you need an external.

I also would like to promote the idea of using a Desktop plus cheap laptop instead of a nice laptop. I built a desktop with overclocked 3 GHZ quad core CPU and a top of the line GPU for $550. So for less money then the cheapest macbook pro (not knocking macs, I used to own and love one, but they are a bit pricey) I have an extremely powerful gaming/video editing/rendering rig and a great laptop. You could also go the desktop + netbook strategy if you dont mind the small keyboards.
As a PC enthusiast who left his desktop at home and used a Macbook while away for post-bacc, having a gaming-capable rig at school drops your GPA by so much especially if others around you game too.

Besides, having two machines requires syncing and you don't really need a desktop these days unless you have hobbies that you mentioned which need the extra performance. In that case, however, I'd assume you already know what you need out of your machine.
 

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Besides, having two machines requires syncing and you don't really need a desktop these days unless you have hobbies that you mentioned which need the extra performance. In that case, however, I'd assume you already know what you need out of your machine.
There are a lot of programs that handle syncing, as well as cloud-storage options, like DropBox, that help reduce the hassle of keeping your systems in sync.
 

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My Macbook is the best notebook I've ever owned in terms of reliable battery life, battery charge retention, ease and speed of sleeping/waking it between classes, durability, mobility, and being just plain 'ol fun to use. It also has a lot of neat perks..like being able to record and sync audio into my lecture notes on Word using the built-in mic. It never freezes, and I can always count on it. I'll never use a PC again. Period.

Macs are a little more expensive, but there's a reason why people are willing to pay a little more.
 

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My Macbook is the best notebook I've ever owned in terms of reliable battery life, battery charge retention, ease and speed of sleeping/waking it between classes, durability, mobility, and being just plain 'ol fun to use. It also has a lot of neat perks..like being able to record and sync audio into my lecture notes on Word using the built-in mic. I'll never use a PC again. Period.

Macs are a little more expensive, but there's a reason why people are willing to pay a little more.
Not to be argumentative, but you can do this on a PC in OneNote.
 

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Well, I think exterior durability isn't something to scoff at either. I wish I hadn't. I baby my computer and it's one step away from imploding at one year old. My problems aren't all cosmetic; the track pad and keyboard don't function properly. Those are two pretty important things when you're trying to input notes and get stuff done quickly. If I have to drag around an extra keyboard and a mouse, what use is a laptop?
either u bought the computer off of dealextreme or such china site, or u dropped ur laptop in such a way that ur standard 1 year warranty isn't applicable. If what u say is true, use ur warranty.
 

vickpick

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My Macbook is the best notebook I've ever owned in terms of reliable battery life, battery charge retention, ease and speed of sleeping/waking it between classes, durability, mobility, and being just plain 'ol fun to use. It also has a lot of neat perks..like being able to record and sync audio into my lecture notes on Word using the built-in mic. It never freezes, and I can always count on it. I'll never use a PC again. Period.

Macs are a little more expensive, but there's a reason why people are willing to pay a little more.
and by a little, u mean, about 500-700 dollars on average?

also, u cant very big screens for macs unless u pay 1200 dollars more than a pc for the same specs AND the same screen size.
 

Jolie South

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either u bought the computer off of dealextreme or such china site, or u dropped ur laptop in such a way that ur standard 1 year warranty isn't applicable. If what u say is true, use ur warranty.
Ummmm. . . . no

I bought it from Dell direct and carry it in a sleeve in a padded laptop bag. Never dropped it.

I already DID use my warranty to fix the mouse, but it broke again. Since it is now past one year, the warranty has lapsed.
 

vickpick

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Ummmm. . . . no

I bought it from Dell direct and carry it in a sleeve in a padded laptop bag. Never dropped it.

I already DID use my warranty to fix the mouse, but it broke again. Since it is now past one year, the warranty has lapsed.
oh yea, talking abt warranties, my ipod's screen stopped working and I called apple and they said I have to go their store which is 3 hrs from my place to get a new one.. what a rip off... I'm planning on going there... just for the sake of my hard earned 300 bucks... I was an apple fanboy until i received a faulty piece (understandable for any company) and they refused accept it through UPS, USPS, FEDEX.. they said I personally have to go there... now I hate apple, i've even stopped eating apples.
 

nick_carraway

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oh yea, talking abt warranties, my ipod's screen stopped working and I called apple and they said I have to go their store which is 3 hrs from my place to get a new one.. what a rip off... I'm planning on going there... just for the sake of my hard earned 300 bucks... I was an apple fanboy until i received a faulty piece (understandable for any company) and they refused accept it through UPS, USPS, FEDEX.. they said I personally have to go there... now I hate apple, i've even stopped eating apples.
I like Apple and have used Macs along with my gaming PC for most of my life. That being said, I am the first to admit that the largest problem with Apple is their service. They charge you a premium for their hardware & software (fair, in my book), but don't offer you the same premium service.

I remember bringing an iPod in that had the two exterior pieces of the case skewed so sharp edges could be felt. They said it was a cosmetic problem that did not affect the usage. Sure, I said but when you pay $500 for something, the service should match the price. Similar things have happened with my old Blackbook. They eventually fix these problems but you have to raise hell for them to do anything.

Contrast that with Bose & Shure & Sennheiser who replace whatever you want whenever you want despite your receipt being lost to the ether. Or Shun's free sharpening. Or Cuisinart's in-store warranty replacement. Or The North Face's equipment repair. Or BMW's willingness to pay for a parking ticket you got in their loaner.

When you pay a premium, a company should work to relieve stress--not add it.