Letter of Intent Timing

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YodaPineapple

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Conventional wisdom varies significantly on this. Did Einstein tell you anything about how they view such letters, or whether they even look at or accept them?

I say, trust your gut. If these letters are accepted or read by the committee, and you know this is your top choice and would definitely attend this school no matter what, send the letter before they make a decision. If you're on the fence, a letter of interest could still be helpful - it wouldn't hurt, at least.
 
I have been fortunate enough to interview at Albert Einstein. However, they have a very low post interview acceptance rate(around 27%, which I believe includes eventual acceptances off the waitlist). So, while I think I had a very good interview, the most likely statistical outcome is a waitlist.

This is the best school out of the ones I have interviewed with, and it's getting late to get any interviews at a better school.

They release decisions on February 1st. Thus, my question is whether it is better to send a letter of intent now, prior to the initial decision in hopes of getting an acceptance, or if I should send it after I am most likely waitlisted? Or does it not really matter?
I interviewed in early october so it's also entirely possible they've made their decision already.
Don't waste your time or theirs.

How would you interpret a nonbinding contract from a desperate applicant?
 
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Don't waste your time or theirs.

How would you interpret a nonbinding contract from a desperate applicant?
It is my understanding that a letter of intent is “binding” not in the literal sense, but more so that if you send a letter of intent to a school and then matriculate elsewhere, can’t you get in trouble?

I thought it was for that reason that letters of intent hold at least some weight for enrollment management purposes?

Maybe I’ll just see what happens in February
 
It is my understanding that a letter of intent is “binding” not in the literal sense, but more so that if you send a letter of intent to a school and then matriculate elsewhere, can’t you get in trouble?

I thought it was for that reason that letters of intent hold at least some weight for enrollment management purposes?

Maybe I’ll just see what happens in February
Nope, and you thought wrong.
 
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