bbeventer

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Basically what is the shakedown with letters of intent? What should I include in one, how long should it be, should it include the dates I want to visit the clinic?

I guess my confusion with these letters is that I want to apply to externships, but these have to be done well in advance, and I don't know if the dates I want at a clinic are available so, if I put dates in my letter of intent, but they aren't available then what, do I have to send in another letter of intent for other dates?

Thanks for any help!
 

shortnsweet

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Ugh I hate letters of intent. What type of externship are you going for? Equine? Smallies? Specialized?

If you want an example of one of mine, PM me.
 
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bbeventer

bbeventer

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Ugh I hate letters of intent. What type of externship are you going for? Equine? Smallies? Specialized?

If you want an example of one of mine, PM me.
That would be great! I am applying to some high volume equine practices.
Thanks!
 

Ben and Me

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Hey bbeventer --

I visited a ton of equine practices while a student and am currently an intern at an equine practice.

I typically wrote a letter of intent (which outlined my interests, why I wanted to visit the practice, etc) and included that as an attachment, along with my resume/whatever else they wanted. Then, in the body of the email, I included the more practical stuff -- such as when I wanted to visit. However, just because the practical stuff isn't in your actual letter of intent, make sure it's professional -- no typos, abbreviations, etc.

If you need help with getting started on your letter of intent, there is a handout on the KState website that gave me a good backbone to start from. If you google "veterinary letter of intent" it should come up.

Hope this helps.
 
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bbeventer

bbeventer

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Hey bbeventer --

I visited a ton of equine practices while a student and am currently an intern at an equine practice.

I typically wrote a letter of intent (which outlined my interests, why I wanted to visit the practice, etc) and included that as an attachment, along with my resume/whatever else they wanted. Then, in the body of the email, I included the more practical stuff -- such as when I wanted to visit. However, just because the practical stuff isn't in your actual letter of intent, make sure it's professional -- no typos, abbreviations, etc.

If you need help with getting started on your letter of intent, there is a handout on the KState website that gave me a good backbone to start from. If you google "veterinary letter of intent" it should come up.

Hope this helps.
Super helpful! thanks!
 

that redhead

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In general, I've mentioned my career interests/goals and how that ties in with that particular facility and expectations of the externship. These are things mentioned at the places I'm applying to. I've kept mine around a page in length. We don't have our dates either, so I mention in the body of the email (with letter/etc attached) that I don't have concrete dates yet but that our blocks are three weeks and that I'm flexible within X time range.

Good luck :luck:
 
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I just found this forum when I was looking for more information about letters of intent for internships. It's such a shame that I didn't find this forum when I was a student, because I've been reading a lot of topics and it would have been really nice to know people experienced a lot of things that I've gone through the same way. Also, it appears to have people from all over the world, which is a plus.

Anyway, I've been trying to keep my letter of intent short and to the point and all that, but I've seen so many different ways to do it, and lots of different advice that I'm getting more confused instead. Basically, to keep it simple:

1- If you just have a contact for further information (email address), should you send an email and attach the letter of intent, CV, or just send the letter of intent as the message body and just attach the CV? Or is it better to send an email before, asking if they are accepting applications at the moment, and if so send the letter of intent/CV later?

2 - Letter of intent: The "What you will bring to the practice" part sounds kind of weird. I know you are supposed to focus on your qualities and why you think the internship would be a good match (for you and for the clinic/hospital), but I'm having a hard time writing in in a way that doesn't sound (at least to me) a little bit like bragging, which I hate. Is it ok to just state the places where you did externships? the general idea is that vague sentences (I am a hard worker, etc) are a "don't", but more specific things sound like you are a little bit full of yourself, at least to me, but I haven't read any real letters of intent, just a couple of examples, so...

Thanks in advance (and if you read all that, thank you!) :)
 

that redhead

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1- If you just have a contact for further information (email address), should you send an email and attach the letter of intent, CV, or just send the letter of intent as the message body and just attach the CV? Or is it better to send an email before, asking if they are accepting applications at the moment, and if so send the letter of intent/CV later?
I would send a general inquiry email that mentions that you're interested in that particular field and asking for more information/do they accept interns, etc. (Or if you know they do, express your interest in their program). If they are receptive, I would then reply with an email with the LOI and resume attached, where the body of the email tells them your materials are attached, to let you know if they need anything else and thank them for their consideration.

2 - Letter of intent: The "What you will bring to the practice" part sounds kind of weird. I know you are supposed to focus on your qualities and why you think the internship would be a good match (for you and for the clinic/hospital), but I'm having a hard time writing in in a way that doesn't sound (at least to me) a little bit like bragging, which I hate. Is it ok to just state the places where you did externships? the general idea is that vague sentences (I am a hard worker, etc) are a "don't", but more specific things sound like you are a little bit full of yourself, at least to me, but I haven't read any real letters of intent, just a couple of examples, so...
I have a hard time with this too because I don't really like talking about myself or bragging either. But the whole point is to highlight your strengths, so you could mention your experiences in x, y and z and how that has helped you develop a, b and c qualities that you think would be beneficial to their practice or make you a good co-worker or whatever. Don't be afraid to brag a bit (within reason) - there will be other candidates who aren't afraid to toot their own horn and you don't want to look back and wish you'd had more faith in yourself/your abilities. I think those reading applications will be able to tell which candidates are laying it on thick and which are just bringing up their good qualities.

Good luck!
 

shortnsweet

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I just found this forum when I was looking for more information about letters of intent for internships. It's such a shame that I didn't find this forum when I was a student, because I've been reading a lot of topics and it would have been really nice to know people experienced a lot of things that I've gone through the same way. Also, it appears to have people from all over the world, which is a plus.

Anyway, I've been trying to keep my letter of intent short and to the point and all that, but I've seen so many different ways to do it, and lots of different advice that I'm getting more confused instead. Basically, to keep it simple:

1- If you just have a contact for further information (email address), should you send an email and attach the letter of intent, CV, or just send the letter of intent as the message body and just attach the CV? Or is it better to send an email before, asking if they are accepting applications at the moment, and if so send the letter of intent/CV later?

2 - Letter of intent: The "What you will bring to the practice" part sounds kind of weird. I know you are supposed to focus on your qualities and why you think the internship would be a good match (for you and for the clinic/hospital), but I'm having a hard time writing in in a way that doesn't sound (at least to me) a little bit like bragging, which I hate. Is it ok to just state the places where you did externships? the general idea is that vague sentences (I am a hard worker, etc) are a "don't", but more specific things sound like you are a little bit full of yourself, at least to me, but I haven't read any real letters of intent, just a couple of examples, so...

Thanks in advance (and if you read all that, thank you!) :)
The What Will You Bring question is really hard, and I struggled a lot with it. I also felt like it was bragging a bit, but after rewriting mine like 20 times with my mentors, I got over it. Just make sure when talking about where you have externed, you don't just re-write your CV. Your CV should be able to stand on its own and show everything you have done. Your LOI should show your personality, and what you feel are your strengths. If you are a good leader because of so and so, tell them and give an example! If you are good in a crisis situation, show them!
 
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The What Will You Bring question is really hard, and I struggled a lot with it. I also felt like it was bragging a bit, but after rewriting mine like 20 times with my mentors, I got over it. Just make sure when talking about where you have externed, you don't just re-write your CV. Your CV should be able to stand on its own and show everything you have done. Your LOI should show your personality, and what you feel are your strengths. If you are a good leader because of so and so, tell them and give an example! If you are good in a crisis situation, show them!
Thank you shortnsweet!