Life, Love, and October 15th

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bananafish94

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Greetings,

As some of you may know, I first came to this forum nearly two years ago (wow!) absolutely despondent over the fact that I hadn't received any interviews by late October. It was frankly a pretty awful time for me, and the fact that two of my good pre-med friends got acceptances on October 15th while I had exactly nothing except rejections did not help much. So, suffice it to say that emotions run pretty high for everybody involved with the always joyous medical school application process at this point of the year. Some people will be getting amongst the best news of their life, some will be utterly disappointed, and some will be left still with the deafening silence. I've experienced all three!

For those who get accepted:

Congratulations! Enjoy your well-earned success; it's a uniquely awesome experience. Try not to forget it.

For those who get waitlisted:

It blows. You can't sugarcoat it. It feels horrible, especially because it's much more personal now that they've met you, talked to you, and you're not just a number and some essays. I got waitlisted over and over and over again and each time still felt like a punch to the gut. However, there is good news. The waitlist is actually a waitlist, and they do move. Not at every school every year, but in general they do. It's not like when you were applying to college. I survived the waitlist game, and many others did too. One of my best friends recently got accepted to medical school in late June after attending an interview and getting waitlisted in March. The game is long.

For those who still haven't heard anything:

It's awful. I know. Especially if you feel like you've done everything right, and you're worried about whether or not you've accidentally done something wrong or if you have some sort of "red flag." But I can tell you from my own experience, as well as the experiences I've had vicariously through many friends and acquaintances who went through the same thing that if you've put together a solid application and applied intelligently, the overwhelmingly likely scenario is that you're a perfectly good applicant and they just haven't gotten to you yet. The solution to this is to just keep doing exactly what you've been doing. Keep getting good grades if you're still in school, keep plugging along with your job or research or volunteering, and keep moving forward. Much easier said than done, I know. Overall, don't panic. There's still a lot of time. A lot of time. I don't expect you necessarily to believe this, because people said the same thing to me when I was in this position, but it is true. I've seen so many people get their first interviews in the winter or spring and go on to become wonderful, successful medical students. Also, keep all of your non-pre-med friends close. They are incredibly valuable.

Good luck to you all, and to all a good night.

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I wish there was a heart button on SDN for this post.
 
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Very motivating thank you!
 
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@bananafish94 it's crazy to think back.

Support of your friends and family (SDN or IRL) is the key to making it. There's a certain aspect to this process that really only people going through it can understand.

Good luck to all! There's so much time left at this point in the game, don't stress. Just keep looking forward.


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I sincerely wish all those who've interviewed a sweet and swift victory to come, hopefully in less than 48 hours or so.

(More so because then they can accept, withdraw from future IIs, and give the rest of us a chance heh ;))
 
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Greetings,

As some of you may know, I first came to this forum nearly two years ago (wow!) absolutely despondent over the fact that I hadn't received any interviews by late October. It was frankly a pretty awful time for me, and the fact that two of my good pre-med friends got acceptances on October 15th while I had exactly nothing except rejections did not help much. So, suffice it to say that emotions run pretty high for everybody involved with the always joyous medical school application process at this point of the year. Some people will be getting amongst the best news of their life, some will be utterly disappointed, and some will be left still with the deafening silence. I've experienced all three!

For those who get accepted:

Congratulations! Enjoy your well-earned success; it's a uniquely awesome experience. Try not to forget it.

For those who get waitlisted:

It blows. You can't sugarcoat it. It feels horrible, especially because it's much more personal now that they've met you, talked to you, and you're not just a number and some essays. I got waitlisted over and over and over again and each time still felt like a punch to the gut. However, there is good news. The waitlist is actually a waitlist, and they do move. Not at every school every year, but in general they do. It's not like when you were applying to college. I survived the waitlist game, and many others did too. One of my best friends recently got accepted to medical school in late June after attending an interview and getting waitlisted in March. The game is long.

For those who still haven't heard anything:

It's awful. I know. Especially if you feel like you've done everything right, and you're worried about whether or not you've accidentally done something wrong or if you have some sort of "red flag." But I can tell you from my own experience, as well as the experiences I've had vicariously through many friends and acquaintances who went through the same thing that if you've put together a solid application and applied intelligently, the overwhelmingly likely scenario is that you're a perfectly good applicant and they just haven't gotten to you yet. The solution to this is to just keep doing exactly what you've been doing. Keep getting good grades if you're still in school, keep plugging along with your job or research or volunteering, and keep moving forward. Much easier said than done, I know. Overall, don't panic. There's still a lot of time. A lot of time. I don't expect you necessarily to believe this, because people said the same thing to me when I was in this position, but it is true. I've seen so many people get their first interviews in the winter or spring and go on to become wonderful, successful medical students. Also, keep all of your non-pre-med friends close. They are incredibly valuable.

Good luck to you all, and to all a good night.

What was the timeline for most of your IIs btw versus when you were complete? (October, November, past new years?)
 
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What was the timeline for most of your IIs btw versus when you were complete? (October, November, past new years?)
I was complete everywhere between the end of July and mid August. I got interviews between late December and February.
 
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I was complete everywhere between the end of July and mid August. I got interviews between late December and February.

What were the ultimate results of your interviews? Did you get in to one of your top choices or a safety?
 
Do you think we can expect to hear today?? Or probably not, since its Sunday?
 
I got off 2 waitlists within a week of each other last May. It's a hell of a wait, but it does happen. =)
 
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For me, I got one II in October (WL) and nothing but silence and rejections until March, when I got a second interview (WL) and waited until May for an acceptance.

It's so much waiting and hoping. It's a long haul, tomorrow is just the beginning.


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It's so much waiting and hoping. It's a long haul, tomorrow is just the beginning.

To borrow 1 quote from one of my past experience, "the only easy day was yesterday."
 
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Is an acceptance going to be a phone call followed by an email?
Depends on your school. Both of my schools notify you via email with either your admission status or to tell you to check your portal.

To borrow 1 quote from one of my past experience, "the only easy day was yesterday."
Definitely agree. I also live by "you can't expect the unexpected" and "Why worry? There's no need to suffer twice"
 
Haha I meant literal tomorrow, but you make it sound way more philosophical! I like it!


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Thank you so much for this post! <3
 
Veteran, yes. SEAL, no. US-military, no. Also the SEAL's quote inspired lots of copycats elsewhere too.

Are you a vet of a foreign military? Also, The only easy day was yesterday is a SEAL motto. Other people copy it, but when you say you had a prior experience where you learned that, I think most people (especially vets) will assume you were a SEAL.
 
Are you a vet of a foreign military? Also, The only easy day was yesterday is a SEAL motto. Other people copy it, but when you say you had a prior experience where you learned that, I think most people (especially vets) will assume you were a SEAL.

Vet of foreign military, though I concur my previous vocation is certainly way below in prestige to SEAL, part of the reason why we had to "borrow" stuff around to stroke our own ego.
 
Vet of foreign military, though I concur my previous vocation is certainly way below in prestige to SEAL, part of the reason why we had to "borrow" stuff around to stroke our own ego.

SEALs are a specific part of our military, and while their prestige is well earned, you shouldn't discount your own service by holding them up on a pedestal. You served, and that's something to be proud of. What military did you serve with? I've spent some time with a few foreign service members through various operations and exercises.
 
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