mcdds75

Full Member
10+ Year Member
Feb 7, 2007
48
0
Status (Visible)
I have seen on different schools websites that LOR are obviously needed, but some require 2 letters, while others require 3 or more from faculty etc...
I might have trouble getting more than 2 quality letters due to the duration of time that I have been out of school. I have a podiatrist who is writing a letter, along with my anatomy instructor. Other than that, I don't have too many resources. Any suggestions?
Also, can the letters get sent directly into AACPM for distribution to the schools being applied to, or does each school need it's own copy?

Sorry, I think I posted this twice!:rolleyes:
 

funfeet

Member
10+ Year Member
Jun 28, 2006
236
0
Status (Visible)
  1. Podiatry Student
You have to send them to each school (AACPM does not offer that service). Just give each person the envelopes with them filled out and a stamp. Send the 2 letters and then if a school requires more, they'll tell you at the interview. Or just call each school, explain the situation and see what they say. Ususally talking to someone from the school is the best bet for the right answer.
 

KHep

Senior Member
7+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Dec 6, 2003
382
1
chicagoland
Status (Visible)
  1. Podiatry Student
Your letters need to be sent directly to the schools to which you apply. As far as getting letters, you will need to do what you can, even if it means digging up professors from 10 years ago, to get as many letters as are required unless you get verification otherwise from each individual school. Do you have a work reference that you would be able to use in lieu of a science faculty letter? If you do, you could ask the schools if you can use that to substitute. Good Luck! I'm sure you will be able to work it out:)
 
About the Ads

KHep

Senior Member
7+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Dec 6, 2003
382
1
chicagoland
Status (Visible)
  1. Podiatry Student
You have to send them to each school (AACPM does not offer that service). Just give each person the envelopes with them filled out and a stamp. Send the 2 letters and then if a school requires more, they'll tell you at the interview. Or just call each school, explain the situation and see what they say. Ususally talking to someone from the school is the best bet for the right answer.

I wouldn't take it for granted that they will notify you at the interview that you are short a letter. Don't gamble. Just call the schools to find out what they want you to do. I know md and do schools wouldn't even review a file until it was complete, so be careful and don't take a chance with pod schools being all that more lenient.
 

JEWmongous

Member
10+ Year Member
Aug 8, 2004
1,200
1
Burlington, VT
Status (Visible)
Do you think its possible to put all your LOR and all your transcripts in one envelope and send them to the individual schools? Everything is obviously signed and sealed. I'm not sure if schools are cool with this or not but it would definitely be more conveinent. Thanks guys.
 

cool_vkb

Member
10+ Year Member
Jun 24, 2006
1,583
3
Status (Visible)
  1. Podiatry Student
Do you think its possible to put all your LOR and all your transcripts in one envelope and send them to the individual schools? Everything is obviously signed and sealed. I'm not sure if schools are cool with this or not but it would definitely be more conveinent. Thanks guys.

Yep i did it! Never had any problem
 

KHep

Senior Member
7+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Dec 6, 2003
382
1
chicagoland
Status (Visible)
  1. Podiatry Student
Do you think its possible to put all your LOR and all your transcripts in one envelope and send them to the individual schools? Everything is obviously signed and sealed. I'm not sure if schools are cool with this or not but it would definitely be more conveinent. Thanks guys.

I would be cautious of this. Generally, schools want the lors to come directly from the source, so that they know that you haven't had access to them. The reason for this is so that the person writing the letter can be as candid as possible without fear of you reading it. If you have handled the lor, then how do the schools know that the information contained in them has been written honestly. I find all of this kind of disheartening. Applying to and getting into school should be serious and as applicants I feel we should handle all of the processes as professionally as we can.

If we want the standards to increase within the profession that we are choosing, then we need to start improving it from the get go. I've read in so many threads in this forum how schools need to be more selective etc. and I just feel like this is a perfect example of trying to cut corners. It's not that difficult to have the person who drafted the letters drop them in the mail, especially when you have already taken the time to properly address them and apply postage. Part of applying is showing that you are willing to go through the effort. I don't mean to sound preachy. I just think that some of these more minor details may be the very things that cause some of the other preprofessional students on sdn to respect prepod students less (whether that is wrong or right isn't the question).
 

JEWmongous

Member
10+ Year Member
Aug 8, 2004
1,200
1
Burlington, VT
Status (Visible)
Hello,
I can understand what you mean about raising the bar for the profession. However, their are much larger and more important things out there that can be done. I'd rather seeing all 8 pod schools taking the MCAT as the sole admissions test. I'd like for some of the schools to stop accepting underqualified students that they know will fail out (but they will still collect tuition money). I would like more advertising of the profession to the public and students. And I wish there was a unified scope of practice across America. For example, If someone completes a PM and S 36 residency in New York state, they will be trained to peform forefoot, rearfoot, and ankle surgery (ankle stuff by orthopedic surgeons). However, if that resident wants to practice in New York State when they graduate, they will NOT be allowed to perform ankle surgery (cannot do cutting operations on the maleoli). The pod can be perfectly trained to do these procedures but the state will not allow it. Is that bizarre or what? :eek: These are just opinions of mine to really increase the standards of the profession. Sorry for the rant!

Considering putting the LOR and transcripts in one envelope, I just think its a little less work for the professors and I can ensure ALL of my materials (transcripts/LOR) are together and sent to the selected pod school. I don't want to do this to cut corners in any way, it is just a method of ensuring that the school will recieve everything. I thought the materials would be okay since they are signed and sealed. I can understand that maybe a student theoretically could try and alter something. However, I am e-mailing the schools to see their opinion on this. Then I can get a definite answer on what to do. Take care.
 

KHep

Senior Member
7+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Dec 6, 2003
382
1
chicagoland
Status (Visible)
  1. Podiatry Student
Hello,
I can understand what you mean about raising the bar for the profession. However, their are much larger and more important things out there that can be done. I'd rather seeing all 8 pod schools taking the MCAT as the sole admissions test. I'd like for some of the schools to stop accepting underqualified students that they know will fail out (but they will still collect tuition money). I would like more advertising of the profession to the public and students. And I wish there was a unified scope of practice across America. For example, If someone completes a PM and S 36 residency in New York state, they will be trained to peform forefoot, rearfoot, and ankle surgery (ankle stuff by orthopedic surgeons). However, if that resident wants to practice in New York State when they graduate, they will NOT be allowed to perform ankle surgery (cannot do cutting operations on the maleoli). The pod can be perfectly trained to do these procedures but the state will not allow it. Is that bizarre or what? :eek: These are just opinions of mine to really increase the standards of the profession. Sorry for the rant!

Considering putting the LOR and transcripts in one envelope, I just think its a little less work for the professors and I can ensure ALL of my materials (transcripts/LOR) are together and sent to the selected pod school. I don't want to do this to cut corners in any way, it is just a method of ensuring that the school will recieve everything. I thought the materials would be okay since they are signed and sealed. I can understand that maybe a student theoretically could try and alter something. However, I am e-mailing the schools to see their opinion on this. Then I can get a definite answer on what to do. Take care.

I agree with all of your suggestions for improving the profession and I apologize if I came off in the wrong way. I know my undergrad operates a lor service for preprofessional students. All of the people that wrote me letters sent them directly to my undergrad's service, then there was a formal interview with the premed advisor, head of biology, and another science prof. Those three people then jointly drafted a letter and included excerpts from all of the other letters so that there was one cohesive composite letter. The service will also let you send any or all of the letters (free of charge) to any professional school to which you are applying. Can't use them for graduate programs though. Anyway, I was lucky to have such a service, so I shouldn't be complaining at all, right:D Anyway, good luck! I'm sure calling the schools is the best bet!
 

JEWmongous

Member
10+ Year Member
Aug 8, 2004
1,200
1
Burlington, VT
Status (Visible)
Good luck to you too. My college is small, 1200 students, with a biology department of 4 professors. So we don't really have the 3 faculty joint letter of recommendation available to us. I will just send some science faculty LOR, one from a podiatrist, and one from my college president. I think it should work out okay.

Anywho, I just got an e-mail back from Scholl. They keep all the application materials on file for one year. You can send transcripts and LOR in the summer before applying. Also, as long as the LOR/Transcripts are all signed and sealed, you can send them in one envelope. :thumbup: I'll find out how the other schools feel about this. Have a good one!
 

krabmas

Senior Member
Moderator Emeritus
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
May 15, 2004
2,167
5
California
Status (Visible)
  1. Fellow [Any Field]
Good luck to you too. My college is small, 1200 students, with a biology department of 4 professors. So we don't really have the 3 faculty joint letter of recommendation available to us. I will just send some science faculty LOR, one from a podiatrist, and one from my college president. I think it should work out okay.

Anywho, I just got an e-mail back from Scholl. They keep all the application materials on file for one year. You can send transcripts and LOR in the summer before applying. Also, as long as the LOR/Transcripts are all signed and sealed, you can send them in one envelope. :thumbup: I'll find out how the other schools feel about this. Have a good one!

I hope your college president really knows who you are and your character.

It does not matter as much who the letters come from as much as what the letters say.

If you work at the local burrito joint and you boss loves you and can articulately say why, like dedication, always ontime and some other great things about your personality that means more than a random letter from any president that you may have spoke to once.
 

cool_vkb

Member
10+ Year Member
Jun 24, 2006
1,583
3
Status (Visible)
  1. Podiatry Student
I would be cautious of this. Generally, schools want the lors to come directly from the source, so that they know that you haven't had access to them. The reason for this is so that the person writing the letter can be as candid as possible without fear of you reading it. If you have handled the lor, then how do the schools know that the information contained in them has been written honestly. I find all of this kind of disheartening.

Yeah dude ofcourse the LOR will be in a sealed envelope. I collected all the sealed LORs from my Profs and sealed transcripts from admission office and kept them in an envelope and sent it to the different schools i applied by Priority Post (i really wanted to all schools to have my application on file before Sep5th or 6th the day when applications opened).

The reason i did was so that the school admission's office can recieve all the info at one single time and decide faster. Rather than saying me, we are waiting for one LOR or we didnt recieved the transcript or we are not able to find something on file. So i wanted to give all the info at once so that they can decide quickly about my admission.
 

JEWmongous

Member
10+ Year Member
Aug 8, 2004
1,200
1
Burlington, VT
Status (Visible)
My college is small as I said, 1200 students so you get to know everyone (students, faculty, admins, buildings and grounds, etc) really well. I am a tour guide for the school and was the head of my college's international orientation program so I worked with a number of administrators, especially the president. Even my freshman year, he knew me and my interests, sports i played there, major, etc. The guy knows and acknowledges all the hard work, dedication and effort that I put into the international program (volunteer position) and the school itself so I think he would be a good character reference. I'll talk to the president a few times a week as everyone sees each other in passing on the walkways, dining hall, etc. School is only 40 acres to being with.

A large majority of the admins and faculty have lunch with the students, go to sporting events, advise student clubs, and more. Heck, our college president is the ski club advisor and comes with us every year on a weekend ski trip to Killington, Vermont. Interesting undergrad to say the least!
 

krabmas

Senior Member
Moderator Emeritus
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
May 15, 2004
2,167
5
California
Status (Visible)
  1. Fellow [Any Field]
My college is small as I said, 1200 students so you get to know everyone (students, faculty, admins, buildings and grounds, etc) really well. I am a tour guide for the school and was the head of my college's international orientation program so I worked with a number of administrators, especially the president. Even my freshman year, he knew me and my interests, sports i played there, major, etc. The guy knows and acknowledges all the hard work, dedication and effort that I put into the international program (volunteer position) and the school itself so I think he would be a good character reference. I'll talk to the president a few times a week as everyone sees each other in passing on the walkways, dining hall, etc. School is only 40 acres to being with.

A large majority of the admins and faculty have lunch with the students, go to sporting events, advise student clubs, and more. Heck, our college president is the ski club advisor and comes with us every year on a weekend ski trip to Killington, Vermont. Interesting undergrad to say the least!


OK you have made your case.
 

Feli

Übermensch
10+ Year Member
Feb 2, 2007
2,085
233
Ariz
Status (Visible)
  1. Podiatrist
Hello,
... I'd rather seeing all 8 pod schools taking the MCAT as the sole admissions test. I'd like for some of the schools to stop accepting underqualified students...
No school ever "knows" a student will fail out. Some people who goofed off in college will mature and work harder in grad school, and some undergrad 3.5 GPA students worked very hard but just don't have the natural talent to compensate for the pace of a medical program. Still, I totally agree the admissions standards could increase, and I also believe they will as podiatric education continues to improve.

Resolution 2015 (maybe run a search for more info) is the APMA's idea to make DPM education increasingly similar and eventually on the same level as MD/DO within the next 8 years. "Parity" is the word they use a lot. The start of that parallel is making the MCAT the sole admission test. Pod schools already have a 4 year program, similar clinical hours, similar sciences, board exams, etc. A final touch to the resolution may be setting firm application deadlines and having podiatry students and graduates take the USMLE or at least having the same testing agency administer the podiatry boards. We'll see as the plan continues...

Sorry if you know all this, but it's just basic background and I'm gonna hit the high points:
-100 yrs ago, the first pod school (NYCPM) was just a 1yr program requiring a prerequisite of 1yr of high school.
-By 1950, all pod schools were 4 year programs which required at least one year of college for admittance.
-In 1965, the degree granted by schools was unified to "D.P.M." and the first podiatric residencies were approved.
-In 1977, podiatrists were permitted to perform hospital OR surgery and admit and patients.
-In 1978, it became standard pod school admission requirement that 3+ years of college were required and the MCAT became preferred.

The above background timeline was baically a paraphrasing of:
Principles and Practice of Podiatric Medicine 2nd Ed (2006)
Chapter 1: The Evolution of Podiatric Medical Practice and Formal Education: Chronological History
by Leonard A. Levy, DPM, MPH
http://www.nova.edu/cwis/com/faculty/levy.html

*End of facts/ start of my take on it:
It shouldn't be hard to see that podiatry has evolved pretty fast to fit a niche. 50 or even 30 years ago, podiatrists were significantly less trained than MDs. Unfortunately, that notion of podiatrists being chip-and-clip nursing home or small office technicians persists today; it is still believed to be true and promoted by some individuals. Even 15 or 20 years ago, only the top few DPM graduates from each school were offered residency training program - typically one year.

Today, residency programs and the education has increased to basically parallel MD/DO education. By now, Podiatrists are defined as physicians almost everywhere it counts: almost all insurance plans and nearly every major govenment program (military, Medicare, Medicaid, etc). The focus of pod school is, of course, podiatry focused, and the podiatry graduates typically come out of school significantly better in lower extremity anatomy, slightly superior in radiology, yet significantly less knowledgeable in neuroanatomy and slightly or significantly less apt in other basic sciences depending on the pod and/or allopathic school(s) in question. Those testing differences may exist due to less qualified applicants to the podiatry schools than those who typically apply to MD/DO programs.

Improved recruiting and more knowledge of the current podiatric medical education is likely to continue to improve the applicant pools and graduate knowledge levels; time will tell. Scope of practice for podiatrists is also likely to continue its improvement as the competence of graduates and the general awareness of that competence increases in the medical field.
 

mcdds75

Full Member
10+ Year Member
Feb 7, 2007
48
0
Status (Visible)
Great, thank you for the advise! Calling each school will work also, sorry for the lack of knowledge with regard to applying, I just don't want to make mistakes.
 

KHep

Senior Member
7+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Dec 6, 2003
382
1
chicagoland
Status (Visible)
  1. Podiatry Student
My college is small as I said, 1200 students so you get to know everyone (students, faculty, admins, buildings and grounds, etc) really well. I am a tour guide for the school and was the head of my college's international orientation program so I worked with a number of administrators, especially the president. Even my freshman year, he knew me and my interests, sports i played there, major, etc. The guy knows and acknowledges all the hard work, dedication and effort that I put into the international program (volunteer position) and the school itself so I think he would be a good character reference. I'll talk to the president a few times a week as everyone sees each other in passing on the walkways, dining hall, etc. School is only 40 acres to being with.

A large majority of the admins and faculty have lunch with the students, go to sporting events, advise student clubs, and more. Heck, our college president is the ski club advisor and comes with us every year on a weekend ski trip to Killington, Vermont. Interesting undergrad to say the least!

Sounds cozy!
 
About the Ads
This thread is more than 14 years old.

Your message may be considered spam for the following reasons:

  1. Your new thread title is very short, and likely is unhelpful.
  2. Your reply is very short and likely does not add anything to the thread.
  3. Your reply is very long and likely does not add anything to the thread.
  4. It is very likely that it does not need any further discussion and thus bumping it serves no purpose.
  5. Your message is mostly quotes or spoilers.
  6. Your reply has occurred very quickly after a previous reply and likely does not add anything to the thread.
  7. This thread is locked.