grapp

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Hello,

I am a senior in high school and like to think ahead. Anyhow, I have noticed typically D.O. schools have lower standards but they all teach similar concepts that a doctor is required to learn. Can a future doctor become achieve a D.O. and still become an emergency room physician? From what I understood this is possible, thanks for all the responses in advance!! This is if I do not qualify for an Allopathic school versus Osteopathic.
 

Stagg737

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Hello,

I am a senior in high school and like to think ahead. Anyhow, I have noticed typically D.O. schools have lower standards but they all teach similar concepts that a doctor is required to learn. Can a future doctor become achieve a D.O. and still become an emergency room physician? From what I understood this is possible, thanks for all the responses in advance!! This is if I do not qualify for an Allopathic school versus Osteopathic.
DOs and MDs are essentially the same degree and a DO can be licensed to do anything an MD can. There are some slight differences, but in terms of what specialties you can apply to and enter or what treatment you can give, there is literally no difference at all.
 
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grapp

grapp

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DOs and MDs are essentially the same degree and a DO can be licensed to do anything an MD can. There are some slight differences, but in terms of what specialties you can apply to and enter or what treatment you can give, there is literally no difference at all.
Would someone with a DO versus MD be looked differently? What are the differences as you say they are minimal? Sorry if I am picking your brain.
 

Stagg737

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Would someone with a DO versus MD be looked differently? What are the differences as you say they are minimal? Sorry if I am picking your brain.
There is still some DO bias, but it depends on what field you're trying to enter and what type of program you want. Generally speaking, there's less hurdles to overcome as an MD, but unless you're trying to match at a top program like Mass General or a very competitive specialty like plastics, it won't significantly hinder you. For a field like you would be fine, though it is becoming competitive faster than many other fields, so any advantage you can get helps.
 

WedgeDawg

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Everything will be easier as an MD, but emergency med is definitely attainable for a DO, particularly if you don't have regional preferences.
 

sonofva

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There are also DO EM residencies, and these will remain DO friendly after the merger settles out
 
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grapp

grapp

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There are also DO EM residencies, and these will remain DO friendly after the merger settles out
Thanks that's good to know. I just have never been the absolute smartest in school, but I work great under pressure and have the stide for it. I was unaware of the Osteopathic schools versus Allopathic. I know I still have to obtain good grades and a solid MCAT score, but it's nice to know I don't have to get all straight A's, lol.
 
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Oct 27, 2013
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Hello,

I am a senior in high school and like to think ahead. Anyhow, I have noticed typically D.O. schools have lower standards but they all teach similar concepts that a doctor is required to learn. Can a future doctor become achieve a D.O. and still become an emergency room physician? From what I understood this is possible, thanks for all the responses in advance!! This is if I do not qualify for an Allopathic school versus Osteopathic.
MD is always better, DO is okay if you want to become primary care.
 
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grapp

grapp

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MD is always better, DO is okay if you want to become primary care.
From what I have seen, it's still possible? So lets say I didn't get into an Allopathic, but got accepted to an Osteopathic, should I accept or wait another year?
 
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From what I have seen, it's still possible? So lets say I didn't get into an Allopathic, but got accepted to an Osteopathic, should I accept or wait another year?
If you cannot get into an MD school, a DO is an acceptable substitute.
 
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grapp

grapp

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If you cannot get into an MD school, a DO is an acceptable substitute.
Alright sounds good, thanks for your response. Good luck, I already see you have made it part way!
 

Stagg737

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Thanks that's good to know. I just have never been the absolute smartest in school, but I work great under pressure and have the want for it. I was unaware of the Osteopathic schools versus Allopathic. I know I still have to obtain good grades and a solid MCAT score, but it's nice to know I don't have to get all straight A's, lol.
Med school is less about being smart and more about being able to stay organized, stay focused, and work hard day in and day out. There's one or two people that I know for a fact I'm generally 'smarter' than who are in the top 10% of my class because they know how to organize and plan their day out perfectly and also bust their butt every day. Being intelligent certainly helps, but there are more important things than just smarts if you want to succeed in med school.

From what I have seen, it's still possible? So lets say I didn't get into an Allopathic, but got accepted to an Osteopathic, should I accept or wait another year?
Apply to both, but if you get into a DO school and not an MD, you're typically better off taking the acceptance. It's almost always harder to get in as a re-applicant than first time. It adds the question of "why didn't you get in the first time" to the minds of adcoms. If you think you're borderline or not a strong applicant for MD, apply to both. If EM is what you end up wanting to do, going the DO route won't hinder you in that goal.
 
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grapp

grapp

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Med school is less about being smart and more about being able to stay organized, stay focused, and work hard day in and day out. There's one or two people that I know for a fact I'm generally 'smarter' than who are in the top 10% of my class because they know how to organize and plan their day out perfectly and also bust their butt every day. Being intelligent certainly helps, but there are more important things than just smarts if you want to succeed in med school.



Apply to both, but if you get into a DO school and not an MD, you're typically better off taking the acceptance. It's almost always harder to get in as a re-applicant than first time. It adds the question of "why didn't you get in the first time" to the minds of adcoms. If you think you're borderline or not a strong applicant for MD, apply to both. If EM is what you end up wanting to do, going the DO route won't hinder you in that goal.
Thank you. I am super excited to get started, can't wait.
 

moisne

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Hello,

I am a senior in high school and like to think ahead. Anyhow, I have noticed typically D.O. schools have lower standards but they all teach similar concepts that a doctor is required to learn. Can a future doctor become achieve a D.O. and still become an emergency room physician? From what I understood this is possible, thanks for all the responses in advance!! This is if I do not qualify for an Allopathic school versus Osteopathic.
The requirements for both are pretty similar... Do well in both. If you have outstanding stats, go MD, if you have average or subpar - go MD and DO application and go wherever they accept you.
 
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grapp

grapp

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The requirements for both are pretty similar... Do well in both. If you have outstanding stats, go MD, if you have average or subpar - go MD and DO application and go wherever they accept you.
Yeah from what I heard... Even if I am a little lower on the GPA end, 3.3... e.g. I'm glad there's a second option.
 

ortnakas

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One step at a time. Focus on high school, then college, then MCAT and college, then applications and college (assuming you're trying to be a traditional student). Get your grades, MCAT, extracurriculars, etc. as much as you can, while not forgetting to have a life. Then apply and see how it works out. It's easier to match into desirable specialties as an MD, but far from impossible as a DO.
 

dntke1518

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One step at a time. Focus on high school, then college, then MCAT and college, then applications and college (assuming you're trying to be a traditional student). Get your grades, MCAT, extracurriculars, etc. as much as you can, while not forgetting to have a life. Then apply and see how it works out. It's easier to match into desirable specialties as an MD, but far from impossible as a DO.
+1 to this. I'm a 4th year DO student who is applying ACGME EM, as are quite a few of my classmates... It really depends on what your med school grades, board scores are... well that and how you interview. But for now, focus on whats right in front of you (undergrad and MCAT).
 

Law2Doc

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Way,way, way too early to pick a specialty. You may get to rotations in mid med school, and simply hate the ED. You probably are picturing it like on tv, with lots of fast paced traumas and crash carts, when in reality you could end up dealing with 100 cases of the flu each night, with a handful of STDs mixed in. Or when you get to med school you may fall in love with something more competitive. Every med student changes their mind at least once. Point is, the advice to a high schooler should really always be to study hard, get into a good college, then study hard, do lots of good ECs, and try to get into the best med school that keeps the most doors open to you.

Basically you have gotten accurate answers to your question but it's simply the wrong question. Your question should be "I think I'd like EM, but its too soon to decide -- if in med school I decide I love rad onc or ortho or derm or Neurosurg, what path will leave me the most options? Because that's what you really need right now.
 
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Done rotations with MD and DO students. Worked with MD and DO attendings. If you're good, you're good. Most of the time, I can' even tell what degree they have unless I look at the badge and half the time, the badge is flipped over, so I still can't tell what degree.
 
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Instatewaiter

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Done rotations with MD and DO students. Worked with MD and DO attendings. If you're good, you're good. Most of the time, I can' even tell what degree they have unless I look at the badge and half the time, the badge is flipped over, so I still can't tell what degree.
This is often true but there are other realities like getting into residency. With the expanding sizes of medical school, it is getting more competitive. DOs are already at a disadvantage when it comes to the match and the unified match will do nothing to change this. In competitive specialties or competitive programs in non-competitive specialties, DOs are at a very singificant disadvantage. When I applied to residency (medicine) there were literally no DO students at any of the programs I interviewed at except my 2 safety programs. There are no DOs and have never been DOs in those programs. That isn't going to cchange any time soon.
 
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This is often true but there are other realities like getting into residency. With the expanding sizes of medical school, it is getting more competitive. DOs are already at a disadvantage when it comes to the match and the unified match will do nothing to change this. In competitive specialties or competitive programs in non-competitive specialties, DOs are at a very singificant disadvantage. When I applied to residency (medicine) there were literally no DO students at any of the programs I interviewed at except my 2 safety programs. There are no DOs and have never been DOs in those programs. That isn't going to cchange any time soon.
What you are saying is true, but there are tons of factors involved. Just like having a 200 on step 1 will mean a zero chance of getting into a top IM program. Maybe not totally zero, but you get the point. Not everyone can be MD/PhD from Harvard with a 260 and AOA with honors in every rotation and 3 letters from superstars saying your are the best student they have seen in 20 years. But you don't have to be to be a great doctor.

Everyone is different, you do the best with what you have. Not everyone can get into a top program, not everyone can get the specialty that they want. Half of all med students are below average, but that doesn't mean you can't be happy. Have realistic expectations and work hard. That is all you can do. I'm at an MD institution, there are plenty of great DO docs there that I respect. We are all future colleagues.