Jul 23, 2016
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Pre-Health (Field Undecided)
Has anyone taken the MA Psychology Jurisprudence exam? I have the booklet that give you, but there are no practice test, so I have no idea how to begin studying for it. I get it that I have to memorize the laws, but is there an emphasis on certain chapters, do I need to know the title and section number of each of the laws? Any input would be greatly appreciated!
Thanks!
 
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ClinicalABA

7+ Year Member
Aug 31, 2011
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New England
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Psychologist
It's been awhile, but the test is pretty straightforward from the regs. Spend a few hours a day on a section for the week before the exam, snood the more time reviewing in the few days before the exam.
 
OP
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Jul 23, 2016
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Pre-Health (Field Undecided)
Thanks for the reply. Do we need to know the specifics such as the corresponding section numbers for the laws, and the number of days that a minor can be held in jail for not showing up to a court date, or is a general understanding of each of the relevant sections sufficient? Thanks in advance.
 

ClinicalABA

7+ Year Member
Aug 31, 2011
1,079
1,185
New England
Status
Psychologist
It's been almost a decade since I took it, so I'm hesitant to comment on specifics. I don't recall any questions specifically related to section numbers, but some of them do get used regularly in our field (e.g "you should file a 51A"; "we may have to Section 12 him"). As far as questions along the line of "what section of law pertains to elder abuse...", I would think there will be few, if any. You definitely should be aware of the timelines in the regs (e.g., "how long can a person be hospitalized against their will before being evaluated"), specifics regarding who can do what (e.g., who has the authority to order an involuntary hospitalization; who must report suspected abuse of a child?). In the grand scheme of test you'll have taken, the book you're studying from is relatively small. Spend your time time learning the details regarding who, specifically needs to what, and when they need to do it.

Save the jurisprudence book- it's a helpful resource that I've consulted several times in my career.
 
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OP
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Jul 23, 2016
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Pre-Health (Field Undecided)
Thanks for your advice - it's greatly appreciated! Quick question - is the exam multiple choice? I realized that I just assumed it was, but don't know for sure. Thanks!
 
Aug 17, 2016
1
0
Status
Psychologist
Has anyone taken the MA Psychology Jurisprudence exam? I have the booklet that give you, but there are no practice test, so I have no idea how to begin studying for it. I get it that I have to memorize the laws, but is there an emphasis on certain chapters, do I need to know the title and section number of each of the laws? Any input would be greatly appreciated!
Thanks!
I am taking the MA jurisprudence in two weeks and I had the same questions as you. There are so many time periods to remember, it's increasing my anxiety. When are you taking yours?
 
Sep 14, 2015
2
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Status
Psychologist
I am taking the MA jurisprudence in two weeks and I had the same questions as you. There are so many time periods to remember, it's increasing my anxiety. When are you taking yours?
I was wondering how the exam went for those who posted in this forum a few months back. Any tips and suggestions for studying?
 

kestrelcry

10+ Year Member
May 22, 2006
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Psychologist
I took it a couple weeks ago. There were some shockingly detailed questions on what I felt was really random ****. It's 20 questions; you get an hour and need 70% to pass. I only studied a few days and passed with lots of room to spare, but there were definitely some tense moments and some guessing.
When you register they'll send you the book pdf or a link to it. If you haven't already done it, the registration process is kind of a pain involving faxing your payment and other info. You can't schedule the test on the website, only by phone.
In addition to the book, there's also a cd with a lecture given years ago by some psychologists involved with ethics stuff. My understanding is that it's a free resource, so if you pm me your email address, I'll send it to you, assuming I can figure out how to compress the files. I listened to that a few times on my commute and read the accompanying notes a couple times maybe. I skimmed the actual book and maybe could have read it with more attention to have a more relaxing test experience. Bottom line is passing tho. To provide context, I'm historically a minimum-effort good text taker with wicked low anxiety.
 
Mar 11, 2017
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0
I am taking the exam next week and had heard about this video. Is it Stephen Behnke, Ph.D. If you were able to compress it and would be willing to email it to me, I would be very appreciative. I'm new to this forum, so let me know how to proceed. Many thanks!
 
Dec 13, 2018
3
0
I want to give my two cents regarding this exam, because I found myself very alone in the process of preparing for it. As someone who recently moved to Mass, it was a challenge to study without guidance.

Things you should know:

The MA Psychology juris prudence exam is a 20 multiple choice questions test. You have one hour to complete the exam and you take it at a testing center.
Questions are very straight forward, and in my opinion (being already licensed in another state) most questions are common knowledge in the field.
Study tips?
You can find the JurisPrudence book online or you can request for it to be mailed to you for free. There are Quizlet questions on-line, which I personally found very helpful. I studied for around 15 hours (skimming the book and reviewing the Quizlet flashcards). That's all I needed to pass the test with more than needed (passing score is 14). Note that I already took a similar exam in another state.
In my experience the questions were not very detailed. Numbers worth knowing include time frames/ fees and practice hours. Review whom to report to in different scenarios, and learn the basic definitions that are at the beginning of each chapter. Also, learn laws that are regularly used in practice: child abuse report/hospitalization laws and process, etc.
Note that if you don't pass the exam you can't retake it immediately. You need to wait three months before taking it again. Once you pass you get a printout with your score and follow-up instructions for licensure.

Good luck!
 
May 26, 2019
5
0
Status
Post Doc
Hi everyone! I just started studying for the Jurisprudence Exam last week and I have the book that is provided. I'm finding a lot of info in there that are largely irrelevant for the practice of psychology, am I right in sensing that or am I super far off? Are there a lot of hypothetical scenario questions like on the EPPP or is it more fact recall? If it's the latter, how much do I need to focus on chapter and section numbers? Any additional info about this exam would be so very much appreciated! Thank you!