Ahmed786

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My MCAT is in two days and I would appreciate if you guys could give me some simple advice on something.

1) In Verbal Reasoning when I am inevitably going narrow some questions down to two answers. Under what conditions should I change my answer after I have put one down. A lot of time this is gut instinct vs voice in my head do you guys change them or usually just go with your gut (initial feeling).

2) How I feel after I am done with the exam, is that indicative of whether or not I should void? I mean after you were done with your exam did you feel you were going to score 3 or more points lower and still score your average? (I say 3 or more points to gauge if you feel REALLY bad or if you feel you will maybe score a point lower but you feel about the same as after a regular AAMC)
 

FollowTheMoney

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In regard to the Verbal strategy, usually the answer that is more encompassing is the one that is correct. Trust me, if you've done enough practice you'll be able to recognize it after eliminating some answer choices. In reference to your question about voiding, I've heard that it looks bad to void the test but I'm not entirely sure. If your done with the test and you legitimately didn't know/guessed on most it I would probably void it (only circumstances I would do that). Best of luck!
 

IndianVercetti

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In regard to the Verbal strategy, usually the answer that is more encompassing is the one that is correct. Trust me, if you've done enough practice you'll be able to recognize it after eliminating some answer choices. In reference to your question about voiding, I've heard that it looks bad to void the test but I'm not entirely sure. If your done with the test and you legitimately didn't know/guessed on most it I would probably void it (only circumstances I would do that). Best of luck!
This is incorrect. If you void the test, nothing will appear - it is as if you had never even taken the test, nothing will show up.

Also, if you have been studying for a reasonable amount of time, I highly recommend NOT voiding..
 

Oncoloman

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True above. Although there are many answers that sound good, usually if you have been an active reader you should be able to look past all of the schemes that the test makers throw at you. There's always one good answer and three that are completely off base. Gut would be best in this case since you have read the passage. I find its best to develop an argument to why my answer is correct. If you can refer to a line in the passage that supports your argument or makes reference to it then USUALLY that's the correct one. Developing arguments = being an active reader in my opinion.

Voiding...like above. Don't do it unless you have guessed a lot. I once guessed/used decent judgment without reading on a practice AAMC just for fun and literally scored the most average score one can score 24. I say make the most out of your opportunity. Good Luck:thumbup:
 

FollowTheMoney

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True above. Although there are many answers that sound good, usually if you have been an active reader you should be able to look past all of the schemes that the test makers throw at you. There's always one good answer and three that are completely off base. Gut would be best in this case since you have read the passage. I find its best to develop an argument to why my answer is correct. If you can refer to a line in the passage that supports your argument or makes reference to it then USUALLY that's the correct one. Developing arguments = being an active reader in my opinion.

Voiding...like above. Don't do it unless you have guessed a lot. I once guessed/used decent judgment without reading on a practice AAMC just for fun and literally scored the most average score one can score 24. I say make the most out of your opportunity. Good Luck:thumbup:
I wouldn't entirely agree with that statement. Usually, the passages are intended for you to figure out the author's purpose and develop a main idea in order to answer the questions. Test makers are banking on you to waste time going back to the passage to "search" for answers. Truth is: you won't find them! The correct answers are usually inferences and cannot be found in the passages. It's more of, did you truly understand the passage, NOT can you mindlessly find an answer randomly in the passage. This test is created to see if you can think like a doctor (analyze an infer), not to think like a secretary (look up stupid ****). Hope that helps!
 

DrSmday

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definitely do not void if you feel like you did a few points below your average... the feeling after the exam is not too indicative of how you did... I walked into my test thinking that I would only void if i had blindly guessed on more than half of the questions or left more than half blank
 

PhilIvey

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I wouldn't entirely agree with that statement. Usually, the passages are intended for you to figure out the author's purpose and develop a main idea in order to answer the questions. Test makers are banking on you to waste time going back to the passage to "search" for answers. Truth is: you won't find them! The correct answers are usually inferences and cannot be found in the passages. It's more of, did you truly understand the passage, NOT can you mindlessly find an answer randomly in the passage. This test is created to see if you can think like a doctor (analyze an infer), not to think like a secretary (look up stupid ****). Hope that helps!
Not always the case. The trend on verbal has been longer passages. You need to read actively. However, if you miss certain key phrases, then you will make the wrong inference. I suggest all of you to get the official AAMC Book. The verbal in that is different from the AAMC and at least on 3/27 version. If I hadn't gone through that, I would have been in trouble and I scored 11 on the 3 AAMC exams I took. Reading and understanding tone was not enough. The passages are longer but the questions easier but they require that you remember key lines.

To illustrate, on the MCAT there was a passage about applying Math to biology. Anyways, I eliminated one answer. I actually remember the answer but obviously can't post it. The point is, I went back and scanned the paragraph that contained the info and the answer became clear. There was no way you could have gotten that right with just the tone. Now, you're right that about 60% are tone of the passage. However, that won't get you a good score. You are right in making inferences, however, you must read carefully so you know where to refer back to the passage so you have the requisite info in order to make that inference. My 2 cents.
 
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Main Idea and Tone things you want to at least get down. What makes it hard is when the questions start referring to key lines/specific details like what Phil Ivey said.

I say void if you completely got owned. If you have weak content review it may be easier to decide. But if you've studied well and feel owned, it goes 50/50. You kinda have to somehow gauge how you've been doing on the problems.
 

StarryNights

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The verbal part on my real test was so long I was just glad to finish. I didn't think it was too bad except for the length. It was even more straightforward than some of the AAMC practice passages (like the Picasso one). To my surprise it was a lot like the EK ones. But I just felt bad coming out and really had no idea how I did. I just went with my gut instinct, except at the end when I had 5 minutes left and caught mistakes when I referred back (but these are detail questions, at most 2). I think your gut instinct and the skills you've developed will serve you well, so try to stick with it. And when I was seriously torn between 2 choices, I picked B.
 

azrk

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The verbal part on my real test was so long I was just glad to finish. I didn't think it was too bad except for the length. It was even more straightforward than some of the AAMC practice passages (like the Picasso one). To my surprise it was a lot like the EK ones. But I just felt bad coming out and really had no idea how I did. I just went with my gut instinct, except at the end when I had 5 minutes left and caught mistakes when I referred back (but these are detail questions, at most 2). I think your gut instinct and the skills you've developed will serve you well, so try to stick with it. And when I was seriously torn between 2 choices, I picked B.
B as in your second choice? What if the one of your answers wasn't B did you pick B anyway?! :laugh:
 

StarryNights

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B as in your second choice? What if the one of your answers wasn't B did you pick B anyway?! :laugh:
Haha, no, but of the times I can recall B was one of the answer choices I narrowed down to for verbal. And I did this for other sections too. One question on PS involving acid-bases I couldn't solve and one orgo discrete, both times I picked B, lol. Some people prefer C. It kept me from wasting time on questions that I most likely wouldn't be able to solve in the amount of time given anyway and so I moved on to the ones where I'd have better luck. But obviously knowing how to solve the problems is much better.