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Pansit

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I have been hearing a lot of talks about changing the DO degree designation from DO to MD, DO...to me it makes sense, why?

1.) Approximately 10 yrs ago, the degree was changed from Doctor of Osteopathy to Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine, there is an inconsistency with the designation...so are we Doctors of Osteopathy (D.O.) or Doctors of Osteopathic Medicine.

2.) We are fully trained Medical Doctors taught in the principles and applications of Osteopathic Medicine (DO), the designation would recognize that aspect.

3.) All international issues would be easily resolved with the added fact of being granted a Medical Doctor degree, which we are!

4.) In my personal opinion, the so called stigma would somewhat decrease, granting the medical doctor designation would ease the minds of many pre-meds who truly like osteopathic principles but are not willing to risk the "DO" obstacles (whether they maybe true or not), competition would increase at each school, increasing their "numbers" and decreasing the "stigma" even more.

5.) For the history buff, A.T. Still was an MD, DO

6) I see only positives to a designation change...what negatives may occur from this? If I see relevance in your answer I would change my stance in a hearbeat?

7) It may take a lot of time and effort but according to Dr. Strosnider of the AOA it can be done if the students are willing to undergo the task. (although the AOA have not, and will probably not support such an attempt, which is why it is up to the students) here is a link for more:
http://blogs.do-online.org/aoapresident.php?itemid=2065

What do you guys feel on this issue.?..let me hear your opinions whether you agree or disagree...I dont mind having the DO designation, its not a big deal to me, it's just that I hear people talking about MD, DO and it makes a lot of sense to me and would only be positive and help further advance the profession.
 

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I have been hearing a lot of talks about changing the DO degree designation from DO to MD, DO...to me it makes sense, why?

1.) Approximately 10 yrs ago, the degree was changed from Doctor of Osteopathy to Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine, there is an inconsistency with the designation...so are we Doctors of Osteopathy (D.O.) or Doctors of Osteopathic Medicine.

2.) We are fully trained Medical Doctors (M.D.) taught in the principles and applications of Osteopathic Medicine (DO), the designation would recognize that aspect.

3.) All international issues would be easily resolved with the added fact of being granted a Medical Doctor degree, which we are!

4.) In my personal opinion, the so called stigma would somewhat decrease, granting the medical doctor designation would ease the minds of many pre-meds who truly like osteopathic principles but are not willing to risk the "DO" obstacles (whether they maybe true or not), competition would increase at each school, increasing their "numbers" and decreasing the "stigma" even more.

5.) For the history buff, A.T. Still was an MD, DO

6) I see only positives to a designation change...what negatives may occur from this? If I see relevance in your answer I would change my stance in a hearbeat?

7) It may take a lot of time and effort but according to Dr. Strosnider of the AOA it can be done if the students are willing to undergo the task. (although the AOA have not, and will probably not support such an attempt, which is why it is up to the students) here is a link for more:
http://blogs.do-online.org/aoapresident.php?itemid=2065

What do you guys feel on this issue.?..let me hear your opinions whether you agree or disagree...I dont mind having the DO designation, its not a big deal to me, it's just that I hear people talking about MD, DO and it makes a lot of sense to me and would only be positive and help further advance the profession.


I think most DOs and MDs would agree with you (at least those who believe the two designations are equivalent). However, it is a moot point - the AOA would not allow for that type of thing. It was attempted in California in the 60's and the Osteopathic leadership freaked out and the movement never took off.

I asked my PCP about this same issue, and he said it all comes down to a bunch of traditional DOs who wish to over-emphasize the differences between allopathic medicine and osteopathic medicine. He said, unfortunately they all happen to be the AOA leadership.
 

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I dont mind it, but I moved to an area where there are hardly any DO's, so I frequently get asked what "I am" with the inference being what my qualifications are. I could have easily had MD put on my nametag and my white coat (in fact, they did put MD on my name tag, but I corrected it), so it isnt that big of a deal.
 
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Pansit

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I think most DOs and MDs would agree with you (at least those who believe the two designations are equivalent). However, it is a moot point - the AOA would not allow for that type of thing. It was attempted in California in the 60's and the Osteopathic leadership freaked out and the movement never took off.

I asked my PCP about this, and he said it all comes down to a bunch of traditional DOs who wish to over-emphasize the differences between allopathic medicine and osteopathic medicine. He said, unfortunately they all happen to be the AOA leadership.

When Dr. Strosnider was asked about this issue he gave recommendations on how to go about it. Starting with getting a majority concensus from students and practicing physicians...etc. When asked if the AOA would be willing to spearhead such an attempt he said that they have no jurisdiction in those types of circumstances and if they wanted it done, the students must do it themselves. The 60's situation that you are referring to would be a completely different situation to the one I am talking about. Students must talk with their proper local agencies to get such a thing started. If there is a large push from the DO community (which I feel can occur if it is well thought out and organized) then it can definitely happen
 

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I dont mind it, but I moved to an area where there are hardly any DO's, so I frequently get asked what "I am" with the inference being what my qualifications are. I could have easily had MD put on my nametag and my white coat (in fact, they did put MD on my name tag, but I corrected it), so it isnt that big of a deal.


You say that you do not mind it, but does it effect you in a negative way?

I mean, are you picked last for the medical dodge ball games because you are a DO?
 

DocBR

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When Dr. Strosnider was asked about this issue he gave recommendations on how to go about it. Starting with getting a majority concensus from students and practicing physicians...etc. When asked if the AOA would be willing to spearhead such an attempt he said that they have no jurisdiction in those types of circumstances and if they wanted it done, the students must do it themselves. The 60's situation that you are referring to would be a completely different situation to the one I am talking about. Students must talk with their proper local agencies to get such a thing started. If there is a large push from the DO community (which I feel can occur if it is well thought out and organized) then it can definitely happen


It would be impressive if that happened.

Does it bother you enough to want to go to the trouble of changing the initials?
 

Pansit

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I dont mind it, but I moved to an area where there are hardly any DO's, so I frequently get asked what "I am" with the inference being what my qualifications are. I could have easily had MD put on my nametag and my white coat (in fact, they did put MD on my name tag, but I corrected it), so it isnt that big of a deal.

I think it would be illegal to place the initials MD if you have not been granted that degree so good thing you changed it. I believe this issue is all based on each individual experience, to you it is not a big deal, to someone else it might be a big deal (ie. their wife has to transfer to UK or germany so what happens to you...a lot of loop-holes will have to be jumped). By changing the designation, it doesnt affect you at all (so it is not a negative) but it can greatly affect someone else (a positive)...that is why I dont see a reason not to do it. I think it not only benefits osteopathic medicine as a whole, it will help further advance it for the future.
 

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I think it would be illegal to place the initials MD if you have not been granted that degree so good thing you changed it. I believe this issue is all based on each individual experience, to you it is not a big deal, to someone else it might be a big deal (ie. their wife has to transfer to UK or germany so what happens to you...a lot of loop-holes will have to be jumped). By changing the designation, it doesnt affect you at all (so it is not a negative) but it can greatly affect someone else (a positive)...that is why I dont see a reason not to do it. I think it not only benefits osteopathic medicine as a whole, it will help further advance it for the future.


Good point :thumbup:

I have been debating the MD/DO thing for a few weeks. Based on interviews and what I have found on the net, I would rather attend a DO school, but I am worried how limiting it might be in the future.
 

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I think it would be a good idea, if only to put a stop to the MD vs. DO threads around here.
 

Pansit

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I think it would be a good idea, if only to put a stop to the MD vs. DO threads around here.


good a reason as any right...lol:laugh:

MD vs. DO was more of a convenient way to designate the argument...it will probably still exist but will become allo vs. osteo...
 

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I think it would be illegal to place the initials MD if you have not been granted that degree so good thing you changed it.

Absolutely not illegal. Unethical, maybe. I know personally of several people who have "MD" on their badge or white coat, when in reality they are a DO. It is a misrepresentation, but since there is no functional difference between a DO and an MD (in the state's eyes), it is a moot point.
 

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Absolutely not illegal. Unethical, maybe. I know personally of several people who have "MD" on their badge or white coat, when in reality they are a DO. It is a misrepresentation, but since there is no functional difference between a DO and an MD (in the state's eyes), it is a moot point.

I see...i guess it would be illegal for a chiropractor or like the mailman to put an MD on a white coat in a hospital...why would you not put DO on your coat if you received the DO degree?...do they get picked on and get beat up during recess by the big bad MD kids...lol
 

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I think that if my white coats had been mismonogrammed, I might not have gone through the effort (and possible expense?) of having them remade. The badge was easy.

Plus, some people dont want to answer the inevitable questions. I don't mind it so much, but there are only ~10 DO residents out of about 700 here.
 
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I think having MD, DO double degree would be good. It avoids confusion for the common folk. It eases worries of silly pre-meds. It avoids unnecessary restrictions on DO's (e.g. who can't pratice as readily internationally, but are fully recognized as equivalent to MD's in the USA). DO's can compete for allo residencies, so they are clearly seen as equivalent by those who count.

Actually, I don't get the impression that there is a great difference between the two in practice -- so why not tack on the MD degree? Sure, pre-med allo's think they're academically superior and pre-med osteo's think they'll be learning better bedside manner. In the end, when you're practicing, few people know the difference and even fewer care (from what I've heard).

There are a bunch of combined degree programs. DO schools would simply be offering only combined MD/DO programs to become a physician (in addition to other combined degrees as they do now). Which raises an interesting thought: Could MD schools also offer a combined MD/DO degree by offering an extra set of classes and different set of rotations for students opting for the extra degree?
 

Pansit

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I think having MD, DO double degree would be good. It avoids confusion for the common folk. It eases worries of silly pre-meds. It avoids unnecessary restrictions on DO's (e.g. who can't pratice as readily internationally, but are fully recognized as equivalent to MD's in the USA). DO's can compete for allo residencies, so they are clearly seen as equivalent by those who count.

Actually, I don't get the impression that there is a great difference between the two in practice -- so why not tack on the MD degree? Sure, pre-med allo's think they're academically superior and pre-med osteo's think they'll be learning better bedside manner. In the end, when you're practicing, few people know the difference and even fewer care (from what I've heard).

There are a bunch of combined degree programs. DO schools would simply be offering only combined MD/DO programs to become a physician (in addition to other combined degrees as they do now). Which raises an interesting thought: Could MD schools also offer a combined MD/DO degree by offering an extra set of classes and different set of rotations for students opting for the extra degree?

well, in relation to your last statement, would that not be a positive thing for the osteopathic community. It will increase awareness and sheer number of DO graduates. However, I think to cover the DO part of the degree, allopathic schools would have to do a lot more than just adding a few classes...they would really have to buy and teach the students the osteopathic philosophy (A.T. Still, body heals itself...all that stuff)...this would lead to only one joint match, any talk of stigma would be gone, residencies would all be equal, maybe one licensing board exam...etc...i only see positives here
 

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well, in relation to your last statement, would that not be a positive thing for the osteopathic community. It will increase awareness and sheer number of DO graduates. However, I think to cover the DO part of the degree, allopathic schools would have to do a lot more than just adding a few classes...they would really have to buy and teach the students the osteopathic philosophy (A.T. Still, body heals itself...all that stuff)...this would lead to only one joint match, any talk of stigma would be gone, residencies would all be equal, maybe one licensing board exam...etc...i only see positives here

I don't see that happenning any time soon. I also don't see the power-hungry AMA and AAMC allowing people to graduate with an MD without them licensing the school themselves (as many have reported, the AOA aren't the only one's with a say in this manner). Would admissions requirements suddenly increase? This is a much larger endeavor than one may realize, especially considering you'd have to satisfy both the egos of the AMA and AOA, both of whom aren't jumping to relenquish power.
 

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possibly the wrong forum to ask...

I would like to do international mission work as a D.O. Will my letters get in my way of doing this later in the road?
 

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possibly the wrong forum to ask...

I would like to do international mission work as a D.O. Will my letters get in my way of doing this later in the road?
Absolutely no problem with missions work in any country, regardless of their permanant license laws...check the websites of the major organizations that do missions work to see it in writing
 

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I think one problem with listing one's credentials as "MD, DO" is that

1.) Having one degree does not mean that you have earned the other. and
2.) It gives the impression that an individual has 2 doctorates when in fact he/she only has 1

Also, I do not believe A.T. Still ever actually attended a DO school and went through the osteopathic training (since he founded it). He earned the MD degree and took on the honory DO afterwards is my understanding.
 

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I am not sure if it would be worth all the work that would have to be done, but the international issues would be solved atleast

I had a question I have not been able to find an anwser to, Can a US trained DO, practice for short periods in India. Its my homeland, and I would like to practice there, on a volunteer basis probably for a few months every few years. On the international list, it says unknown, but say you did a ACGME residency, and the USMLE's and were board certified, wouldnt that be enough to let you practice?

thanks guys
 

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why not just call it a MDO - medical doctor of osteopathy.... Would be like MD plus some other stuff :)
 

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why not just call it a MDO - medical doctor of osteopathy.... Would be like MD plus some other stuff :)

This is exactly what I think! Perfect balance, right? We would retain our different designation, however overcome the stigma and questions of the general public. But, how do we accomplish this? I think It would definately remedy the accademic problems, I think the competetiveness would be equalized and more pre-meds would apply to D.O. schools.
 

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if a DO takes the USMLE, lets say all steps and passes. Does that make him D.O./M.D. someone told me this and just wondering? if it is such a huge issue to some.
 
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HumbleMD

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if a DO takes the USMLE, lets say all steps and passes. Does that make him D.O./M.D. someone told me this and just wondering? if it is such a huge issue to some.
Nope. If all it took to get an M.D. was passing my USMLE boards, I'd save my $200K and go buy a Kaplan review book...
I do think this thread is interesting in that it doesn't seem to acknowledge that there seems to be a lack of M.D.'s wishing getting a D.O. after their name...
 

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if a DO takes the USMLE, lets say all steps and passes. Does that make him D.O./M.D. someone told me this and just wondering? if it is such a huge issue to some.

No, it doesn't. I am kind of confused by this thread. If you do not want a DO and don't have the grades to go US MD, then go to the carib or get your stats up and re-apply. If you think that you are going to spend a life-time worrying about your degree, then don't go to a DO school. In the places of the country where people are unfamiliar with the DO degree, then take the time to explain to them what is is. I plan on working in the NE, so there are a strong concentration of DO's.
 

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Nope. If all it took to get an M.D. was passing my USMLE boards, I'd save my $200K and go buy a Kapan review book...
I do think this thread is interesting in that it doesn't seem to acknowledge that there seems to be a lack of M.D.'s wishing they could get into the so-coveted D.O. residency positions, or getting a D.O. after their name...

...and so it begins. :rolleyes:

Seriously, what the hell does this thread have to do with MDs wanting to get into DO residencies or getting the DO letters? Unless, of course, you're just trying to steer the discussion in that direction so you can start another flamewar.

Was the HumbleMD name originally intended to be ironic or did it just become that after a few med school acceptances?
 

HumbleMD

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...and so it begins. :rolleyes:

Seriously, what the hell does this thread have to do with MDs wanting to get into DO residencies or getting the DO letters? Unless, of course, you're just trying to steer the discussion in that direction so you can start another flamewar.

Was the HumbleMD name originally intended to be ironic or did it just become that after a few med school acceptances?
That was the point. That it was about convergence of two disciplines, but seemed to forget that convergence demands two players, not just one. I'll be the M.D. whipping boy on this thread if I need to be, but there at least needs to be a voice of the "other."
 

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That was the point. That it was about convergence of two disciplines, but seemed to forget that convergence demands two players, not just one. I'll be the M.D. whipping boy on this thread if I need to be, but there at least needs to be a voice of the "other."

I don't believe this was about a convergence. No one said to forget D.O. and just completely make it M.D. Rather it is a discussion about changing the name to better represent the educational background and also to fit the public eye better. I think we should honor our differences, however I think O.M.D. or M.D.O is more fitting of our credentials.
 

HumbleMD

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I don't believe this was about a convergence. No one said to forget D.O. and just completely make it M.D. Rather it is a discussion about changing the name to better represent the educational background and also to fit the public eye better. I think we should honor our differences, however I think O.M.D. or M.D.O is more fitting of our credentials.

But the M.D.O. designation would seem to fall into the antiquated and pompous assertion that a D.O., in their 4 years of training, does the same training as an M.D. and more. There are still subtle differences and some things are cut back to make room for O.M.

Yeah, yeah, I'm done.
 

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But the M.D.O. designation would seem to fall into the antiquated and pompous assertion that a D.O., in their 4 years of training, does the same training as an M.D. and more. There are still subtle differences and some things are cut back to make room for O.M.

Yeah, yeah, I'm done.
Ya know what, you can go to D.O. school AND M.D. school and then let us know how these valuable differences weigh.:laugh: No one, other than a few pieved M.D.'s are going to overanalyze the distinction.:cool: In that case maybe we shouldn't let phd's be called doctors, or D.O.M. (doctor of oriental medicine)??:cool:
 

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But the M.D.O. designation would seem to fall into the antiquated and pompous assertion that a D.O., in their 4 years of training, does the same training as an M.D. and more. There are still subtle differences and some things are cut back to make room for O.M.

Yeah, yeah, I'm done.

I don't think there are major differences between an MD and a DO school. If anything, the irony is that the DO's COMLEX emphasizes things such as pharmacology and micro ALOT more than the USMLE. Supposedly the DO philosophy emphasizes "alternative" medicine and "holistic approach" to medicine. Sure, OMM is alternative, but it's the only difference. Both MD and DO schools emphasize looking at patients in its entirety and "good ole bedside manners" ... it's just that one states it explicitly (DO) and the other one infers this implicitly (MD). At the end of the day, THE philosophy is to serve others, treat patients to the best of one's abilities, and cure them if at all possible. All this overemphasizing of "holistic" ideas is total bullsh*t, as it may have been the case several decades back, but certainly is not the case now. Everyone looks to treat the patient along with the disease, and not just the latter.
 

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Nope. If all it took to get an M.D. was passing my USMLE boards, I'd save my $200K and go buy a Kaplan review book...
I do think this thread is interesting in that it doesn't seem to acknowledge that there seems to be a lack of M.D.'s wishing getting a D.O. after their name...

Well humble as always you steer the whole discussion in a completely different direction. This was not about allopathic vs. osteopathic. This is about fixing the inconsistency in getting a doctor of osteopathic medicine degree and still having the designation of D.O. Osteopathic physicians are medical doctors so that is why adding an MD would make sense. What does Allopaths wanting to add D.O after there name have to do with anything? This is about a discussion to help improve the osteopathic profession, not to change the minds of allopaths to become DO's. Stop trying to incite things:thumbdown:
 
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I don't think there are major differences between an MD and a DO school. If anything, the irony is that the DO's COMLEX emphasizes things such as pharmacology and micro ALOT more than the USMLE. Supposedly the DO philosophy emphasizes "alternative" medicine and "holistic approach" to medicine. Sure, OMM is alternative, but it's the only difference. Both MD and DO schools emphasize looking at patients in its entirety and "good ole bedside manners" ... it's just that one states it explicitly (DO) and the other one infers this implicitly (MD). At the end of the day, THE philosophy is to serve others, treat patients to the best of one's abilities, and cure them if at all possible. All this overemphasizing of "holistic" ideas is total bullsh*t, as it may have been the case several decades back, but certainly is not the case now. Everyone looks to treat the patient along with the disease, and not just the latter.

Yeah if OMM is so different but the core medicine is the same between DO and MD, why not just abolish DO schools and make DO a specialty
 

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I don't see that happenning any time soon. I also don't see the power-hungry AMA and AAMC allowing people to graduate with an MD without them licensing the school themselves (as many have reported, the AOA aren't the only one's with a say in this manner). Would admissions requirements suddenly increase? This is a much larger endeavor than one may realize, especially considering you'd have to satisfy both the egos of the AMA and AOA, both of whom aren't jumping to relenquish power.

This is from the President of the AOA on how to go about a change if it were to occur (I dont see anything about AMA or AAMC anywhere here), so correct me if I am wrong if they would have an input in the matter, maybe the ambigous part in the end (bureaus)?

"This effort could be started by several entities through a multitude of actions. At the COM level, the issue would need the support of the Academic Officials (Deans) and the student representative organizations (e.g. COSGP, SOMA). Strong support at the COM level is required in order for the AOA's accrediting arm, the Commission on Osteopathic Accreditation (AOA COCA - which is entirely separate from AOA Board control) to launch any preliminary exploratory studies. This is the reason I have previously stated that if you are so fervent about this issue you should go to your deans to pursue your desire.

At the state level, interested individuals would need to work with their state associations to make certain that the new designation would be accepted by state legislatures and medical boards.

At the federal level the AOA would need to coordinate with federal officials to make certain that there is no loss of status in federal statutes and regulations by changing the degree designation.

And finally the issue would need to be reviewed by appropriate bureaus, committees, councils and the AOA Board, as well as COCA"
 

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Yeah if OMM is so different but the core medicine is the same between DO and MD, why not just abolish DO schools and make DO a specialty

I was thinking about the same thing :idea: ......or just have the MD degree and have OMM as a specialty since it seems that a good percentage of DOs do allopathic residencies or don't use OMM in practice.
 

Pansit

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why not just call it a MDO - medical doctor of osteopathy.... Would be like MD plus some other stuff :)

This would be a bad idea in my opinion, and would rather keep the DO label. Why? The public is still going to question what an MDO is. There are so many ambigious designated professions and it would just lump MDO to all of those (Oriental Medical Doctor, OMD...etc) This designation will not fix any of the international issues, and all those people who now know what a DO is (because there PCP is one or heard about it from somewhere, remember osteopathy has been around for over 100 years) will now have to be reeducated. I think any designation similar to MDO or OMD or MD-O will not really change anything and actually has negative aspects to its inception, something that MD, DO does not seem to have. I dont just want to add MD to the designation for the sake of it, I want it to help further the profession from the obstacles that it may currently be having.
 

koshka

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This would be a bad idea in my opinion, and would rather keep the DO label. Why? The public is still going to question what an MDO is. There are so many ambigious designated professions and it would just lump MDO to all of those (Oriental Medical Doctor, OMD...etc) This designation will not fix any of the international issues, and all those people who now know what a DO is (because there PCP is one or heard about it from somewhere, remember osteopathy has been around for over 100 years) will now have to be reeducated. I think any designation similar to MDO or OMD or MD-O will not really change anything and actually has negative aspects to its inception, something that MD, DO does not seem to have. I dont just want to add MD to the designation for the sake of it, I want it to help further the profession from the obstacles that it may currently be having.

I have a slight problem with your rationalizations...You keep on repeating that the "public" questions the "DO label"...I really don't think it's the patients that question anything
 

Pansit

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I have a slight problem with your rationalizations...You keep on repeating that the "public" questions the "DO label"...I really don't think it's the patients that question anything

When I say public I dont mean just patients, to clarify, I meant residency directors, international medical boards ect...I am stating that they would question MDO alot more than if we kept just kept the DO designation because a lot of more work has been to have the D.O. label recognized. You dont want to bypass all that work to have it changed to something else like MDO.
 

DrBowtie

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You'd have more people who don't care about the DO aspects attending your schools. Everytime anyone says anything about DO vs. MD on a thread, there are always a few that say X% applied DO only etc. By trying to get the established perception of the MD, will come people who intend to highlight the MD portion. I'd see it as a major decline in the identity of osteopathy, and there are many who stand to benefit from a strong separate identity (AOA, COCA etc).

$0.02
 

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Yeah if OMM is so different but the core medicine is the same between DO and MD, why not just abolish DO schools and make DO a specialty

Took the words right out of my mouth ... I totally agree. :thumbup:

It ought to be a residency or fellowship in alternative medicine. I also believe that it should be an elective for DO schools because not every student has an inherent interest in OMM. Sure, its great and it's resourceful for those in PC and Sports Medicine, but then again, not everyone in the DO world wishes to be a PC physician, even if the AOA continues to believe otherwise.
 

HumbleMD

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Took the words right out of my mouth ... I totally agree. :thumbup:

It ought to be a residency or fellowship in alternative medicine. I also believe that it should be an elective for DO schools because not every student has an inherent interest in OMM. Sure, its great and it's resourceful for those in PC and Sports Medicine, but then again, not everyone in the DO world wishes to be a PC physician, even if the AOA continues to believe otherwise.

If someone has no interest in OMM, why not go to an M.D. school?
 

ruck

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A friend of mine told me that he knows of three DOs in different hospitals and none of them were wearing their white coats. He thinks that it is because they don't want to be scrutinized by others. I don't think that is the reason why they were not wearing their white coats. What do you think?
 

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A friend of mine told me that he knows of three DOs in different hospitals and none of them were wearing their white coats. He thinks that it is because they don't want to be scrutinized by others. I don't think that is the reason why they were not wearing their white coats. What do you think?

where'd you hear this from? your local premed gunner you sit next to in orgo? :laugh:

that post just made this ...

http://www.frontiernet.net/~rainh2o/bad%20threads/Gay%20Thread%20congrats.jpg
 

JasonUD

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2.) We are fully trained Medical Doctors (M.D.) taught in the principles and applications of Osteopathic Medicine (DO), the designation would recognize that aspect.

I agree. What do MD students learn that we don't? MD/DO or DO/MD is fitting since we do, know and practice all they do plus OMM. Even for those in DO schools who don't believe in OMM, we learn to use our hands more than I would imagine MD students do. 2 hours of OMM lab a week + practicing and studying these techniques on family and friends mean that we feel for difference perhaps better than MD students who do not get as much hands on interaction as we do (NOTE: I have never attended an MD medical school so this is only speculation so don't attack me!!). DO/MD or MD/DO would probably be more noticable on our name tags/coats and cause more patients to inquire what exactly the DO part is. Also, if its written this way rather than DO,MD it would not imply that we have two doctorates.
 

JasonUD

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4.) In my personal opinion, the so called stigma would somewhat decrease, granting the medical doctor designation would ease the minds of many pre-meds who truly like osteopathic principles but are not willing to risk the "DO" obstacles (whether they maybe true or not), competition would increase at each school, increasing their "numbers" and decreasing the "stigma" even more.

Not only that, but all my friends moms that tell my other friend's moms that I'm in MD school specializing in Chiropratics would end!! I think more people would realize that we are ACTUAL MEDICAL DOCTORS plus a little extra!
 

Dr.Inviz

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I agree. What do MD students learn that we don't? MD/DO or DO/MD is fitting since we do, know and practice all they do plus OMM. Even for those in DO schools who don't believe in OMM, we learn to use our hands more than I would imagine MD students do. 2 hours of OMM lab a week + practicing and studying these techniques on family and friends mean that we feel for difference perhaps better than MD students who do not get as much hands on interaction as we do (NOTE: I have never attended an MD medical school so this is only speculation so don't attack me!!). DO/MD or MD/DO would probably be more noticable on our name tags/coats and cause more patients to inquire what exactly the DO part is. Also, if its written this way rather than DO,MD it would not imply that we have two doctorates.

Quite frankly, "MD/DO" or "DO/MD" just sounds funny, is more noticeable to patients, and begs for wide-open attacks of insecurity :laugh: :smuggrin:

insecure_logo.jpg
 
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