agk1216

2+ Year Member
Sep 4, 2015
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Pre-Medical
So I think I may have a unique situation. I was a community college student who transferred to a large public school and unfortunately I've fallen ill to the point that i'll no longer be able to continue my studies here. I still want to continue my education however while I'm getting treatment back home (so I'd transfer to a small college back at home). I'm wondering how bad would it look when I apply to med school given that I had medical problems and then transferred yet again?
 

Catalystik

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Sep 4, 2006
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So I think I may have a unique situation. I was a community college student who transferred to a large public school and unfortunately I've fallen ill to the point that i'll no longer be able to continue my studies here. I still want to continue my education however while I'm getting treatment back home (so I'd transfer to a small college back at home). I'm wondering how bad would it look when I apply to med school given that I had medical problems and then transferred yet again?
Officially withdraw from your current school, go home and get treatment, then resume your education when you're ready to academically excel. Getting sick and doing the right thing to take care of yourself, even taking some time away from school, is not a bar to future success in the med school application process.
 

Goro

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Jun 10, 2010
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This is very common and it won't hurt you.

Withdrawing for medical reasons is a sign of maturity and prudence. Far better than fools who try to bull their way through school and end up cratering their GPAs.


So I think I may have a unique situation. I was a community college student who transferred to a large public school and unfortunately I've fallen ill to the point that i'll no longer be able to continue my studies here. I still want to continue my education however while I'm getting treatment back home (so I'd transfer to a small college back at home). I'm wondering how bad would it look when I apply to med school given that I had medical problems and then transferred yet again?
 

gonnif

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This is what withdrawals are for: "external" reasons that may strongly impact academic performance. I am sure that medical is the number 1 reasons for withdrawal.

BTW, this is kind of thing you note on the "additional information" question on a secondary application: "withdrew from College X year 2015 due to illness." And that's all you need to say frankly
 
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agk1216

2+ Year Member
Sep 4, 2015
6
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Pre-Medical
Thank you all. How bad would it look not going back to the same school though?
 

Catalystik

The Gimlet Eye
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Sep 4, 2006
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Thank you all. How bad would it look not going back to the same school though?
It's not so uncommon that folks have reason to relocate closer to home, like personal relationships, aging grandparents, parents who need help, a school that is a better fit for their interests, etc, so I doubt much will be thought of the issue at all.
 

Doug Underhill

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Sep 2, 2011
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Adcoms are full of physicians, and physicians are acutely aware that conditions exist that are serious enough to warrant a withdrawal.

I know someone who was unable to continue their studies recently due to severe arm pain. The orthopedists did some kind of procedure and she was back the next week. This is a good outcome, but it made all of the paperwork kind of pointless. Your case may not be comparable, but it illustrates the necessity of treatment.

Get well soon.
 

italiancowgirl

5+ Year Member
Aug 22, 2011
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Medical Student
I had 7 transcripts because of military and personal illness. I am enjoying my first year with many students who excelled in a huge variety of schools (sometimes plural) and the most important element is what you have done in each experience to learn and grow. Illness teaches you, and different environments do also. What will each part of life teach you and how will you show it all? Those are the real questions.