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Mention LGBT in secondary?

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pillowsnice

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Mount Sinai's secondary asks for a non academic passion and was wondering if it is appropriate to mention LGBT issues? The only thing is that I really have no backup to my claims as I recently came out and haven't been involved with any LGBT related activities in college. I do, however, hope to contribute to the community in med school.
Another passion I could write about is working with the underserved which I have actual experience working with.
 

Ad2b

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@familyaerospace - hoping you can help chime in here :) Pillow - Aero is the best person I have found to answer these types of questions; open about everything (and we all cheer!!)
 

Pagan FutureDoc

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There are many secondary prompts that it would be appropriate to talk about LGBT issues, sadly this one doesn't seem right for you.
You seem far to new to it all to really speak of it as a passion.
 
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ed*26

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What about mentioning your identity in this essay on Mt Sinai's secondary? It explicitly lists sexual orientation as an example.

If there is an important aspect of your personal background or identity, not addressed elsewhere in the application, that you would like to share with the Committee, we invite you to do so here. Many applicants will not need to answer this question. Examples might include significant challenges in access to education, unusual socioeconomic factors, and identification with a culture, religion, race, ethnicity, disability, sexual orientation or gender identity. Briefly explain how such factors have influenced your motivation for a career in medicine. (100 words)

As for academic passion, I would mention something that you have significant experience working towards. What you can do is focus on your service to the underserved, then mention that you hope to a serve LGBTQ populations in medical school.
 

Lawpy

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    Goro

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    Perfectly fine except for LUCOM and Loma Linda.

    Mount Sinai's secondary asks for a non academic passion and was wondering if it is appropriate to mention LGBT issues? The only thing is that I really have no backup to my claims as I recently came out and haven't been involved with any LGBT related activities in college. I do, however, hope to contribute to the community in med school.
    Another passion I could write about is working with the underserved which I have actual experience working with.
     

    pillowsnice

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    What about mentioning your identity in this essay on Mt Sinai's secondary? It explicitly lists sexual orientation as an example.

    If there is an important aspect of your personal background or identity, not addressed elsewhere in the application, that you would like to share with the Committee, we invite you to do so here. Many applicants will not need to answer this question. Examples might include significant challenges in access to education, unusual socioeconomic factors, and identification with a culture, religion, race, ethnicity, disability, sexual orientation or gender identity. Briefly explain how such factors have influenced your motivation for a career in medicine. (100 words)

    As for academic passion, I would mention something that you have significant experience working towards. What you can do is focus on your service to the underserved, then mention that you hope to a serve LGBTQ populations in medical school.

    I wondering though if it is worth mentioning LGBT here as it honestly has not motivated my desire to be a physician. I hope to make an influence on the LGBT community in the future, but to this point, it is not a reason why I choose medicine.
     

    lostpremed123

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    I really have no backup to my claims as I recently came out and haven't been involved with any LGBT related activities in college
    You basically answered your own question. The answer is no, because you have nothing to back it up with, so it won't do anything to add dimension to things already on your application. Basically, it will seem like you're just throwing in that you're LGBT as an afterthought, without showing that it has really shaped who you are and they want to know what shaped who you are and what shaped your interest in medicine.
     

    ChrisMack390

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    Mention this on Sinai's diversity question.

    Do not call something a "passion" when you have never actually participated in it.
     
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    familyaerospace

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    @familyaerospace - hoping you can help chime in here :) Pillow - Aero is the best person I have found to answer these types of questions; open about everything (and we all cheer!!)

    Sorry I didn't see this message earlier, was recovering from surgery so wasn't anywhere near a computer for a while. Between my partner and my best medical school friend, if I even looked at a computer I would get a lecture. I wish I would get an email when tagged in things like I do when I get PMed.

    I would agree that you need to take caution depending on the school. If a school is known to be LGBT friendly, it certainly cannot hurt. If a school is religious, like Goro mentioned, it might be best to lay low.
     
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    familyaerospace

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    Oh gosh, @familyaerospace - I hope that you are recovering well. VERY glad to hear you have support while you do so.

    Thank you, I am much better now.

    My gallbladder decided to try to kill me... it took two or three weeks of me being miserable before they finally figured out what was going on (two different doctors missed it, but the ER finally caught it) and by that time it started to leak and was about to rupture. 4 days in the hospital, then 2 weeks not being allowed to move, and an additional week of being very careful. Today was the first time I returned to completely full activities. At least I never have to worry about gallstones again! :)

    And the hospital (with the exception of one doctor) treated me well and were fine with the LGBT aspects. I was pleasantly surprised. Will definitely go to that hospital again if I have to go.

    Best of all I have a new curse for people I don't like: "May you have problems with your gallbladder." This replaces "May you step barefoot on a thousand Legos."
     
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    Mount Sinai's secondary asks for a non academic passion and was wondering if it is appropriate to mention LGBT issues? The only thing is that I really have no backup to my claims as I recently came out and haven't been involved with any LGBT related activities in college. I do, however, hope to contribute to the community in med school.
    Another passion I could write about is working with the underserved which I have actual experience working with.

    After talking with an M3 who was representing the school, they said that Mt. Sinai has a very inclusive atmosphere for LGBTQ students.
     

    Ad2b

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    @familyaerospace - I have heard that about gallbladders and am disappointed that it wasn't caught earlier; heart attack like stabbing pains, unable to breathe is what I've been told.

    My hope, outside of your successful recovery, is that maybe you taught the one doctor something: compassion. And that MS2 is better than MS1 :)
     

    familyaerospace

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    @familyaerospace - I have heard that about gallbladders and am disappointed that it wasn't caught earlier; heart attack like stabbing pains, unable to breathe is what I've been told.

    My hope, outside of your successful recovery, is that maybe you taught the one doctor something: compassion. And that MS2 is better than MS1 :)

    Stabbing pains, nausea, vomiting, anorexia. I was able to breath until you touched my URQ then I hit the roof.

    I taught that doctor nothing, but I did teach my med school BFF that if she sees red flags, to call out on them even if it is an attending. That guy actively was antagonistic and was violating the written orders the surgeon gave and caused some problems and delayed recovery.

    Thanks, but I have to redo M1 so I am hoping M1 attempt 2 is better than M1 attempt 1. *crosses fingers*
     
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    Ad2b

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    I taught that doctor nothing

    That irks me beyond words. I know this is somewhat hijacking the thread but hopefully, the OP is gaining some helpful insight into what the LGBTQ crowd can encounter.

    Aero, my heart breaks for you. When you got accepted, I think all of us openly cheered, clapped our collective hands and said, "Finally" ... then, we watched as the @#$fest unfolded with your medications being stolen, your laptop too, if I'm not mistaken...

    Your BFF sounds like a true champion. Kudos to her for standing up for you, despite the harm that might have come. Your health > excreting physicians.

    Thanks, but I have to redo M1 so I am hoping M1 attempt 2 is better than M1 attempt 1. *crosses fingers*
    I can only speak for me but my guess is that the collective SDN community that cheered you last summer, is cheering for you again. WE believe in you Aero. For whatever it's worth, *I* believe in you. I think I've overcome adversity, and then I think of you - you are one of the strongest people I *know* ...
     
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    TRAVELER2016

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    What about mentioning your identity in this essay on Mt Sinai's secondary? It explicitly lists sexual orientation as an example.

    If there is an important aspect of your personal background or identity, not addressed elsewhere in the application, that you would like to share with the Committee, we invite you to do so here. Many applicants will not need to answer this question. Examples might include significant challenges in access to education, unusual socioeconomic factors, and identification with a culture, religion, race, ethnicity, disability, sexual orientation or gender identity. Briefly explain how such factors have influenced your motivation for a career in medicine. (100 words)

    As for academic passion, I would mention something that you have significant experience working towards. What you can do is focus on your service to the underserved, then mention that you hope to a serve LGBTQ populations in medical school.

    You shouldn't frame it as a "passion" if you don't have that proof of commitment to service.. but being LGBT is about more than extracurriculars. It has a huge impact on your experiences growing up and on your personal characteristics, whether you are out or not. Having that very personal experience of being different from others (and in a way that is often stigmatized in society) is hugely important and I think it could certainly add to your application. (So maybe address it in your response to this prompt rather than in your response to the prompt in your OP.)
     

    Instatewaiter

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    Mount Sinai's secondary asks for a non academic passion and was wondering if it is appropriate to mention LGBT issues? The only thing is that I really have no backup to my claims as I recently came out and haven't been involved with any LGBT related activities in college. I do, however, hope to contribute to the community in med school.
    Another passion I could write about is working with the underserved which I have actual experience working with.

    I think when they say non-academic passion- I don't think they meant in the bedroom... I kid...

    Adding LGBT issues (provieded your are LGBTQ) can work in 2 ways. One it can turn a place off... That said is that really a place you want to be if you are LGBTQ? Second it could help your chances. If these issues are important to you- in that you wouldn't be OK if a place didn't know you were LGBTQ- include it. If you really want to be at a place that is very OK with you being LGBTQ- include it.
     

    familyaerospace

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    Aero, my heart breaks for you. When you got accepted, I think all of us openly cheered, clapped our collective hands and said, "Finally" ... then, we watched as the @#$fest unfolded with your medications being stolen, your laptop too, if I'm not mistaken...

    It was my laptop, then several others broke including one during my final. Total my car was broken into 3 times, my house once (which is where the laptop was stolen) and with several other house attempts and there was also a sexual assault ironically by a gay man. I was put on medications for PTSD, I am on I think medication number 7 as I kept having bad reactions. I had to eventually go to a psychopharmacologist to find out what was going on, turns out she confirmed something I had been saying for years and gave me the medical reason why. Also not one, not two, but THREE members of my family died within two months of each other. In order: Cousin, Grandmother, and Aunt. It was no wonder I was stressed.

    Your BFF sounds like a true champion. Kudos to her for standing up for you, despite the harm that might have come. Your health > excreting physicians.

    She didn't yet, but she vowed to do it in the future. She didn't realize things were as bad as they were and she hates confrontation. However, she feels so intensely guilty for not standing up, she swears up and down she will not make that mistake again. More truth came out as we were getting ready for discharge and later when I was discharged... he did everything we are told not to do in PD and we can't find a record of where he went to medical school.

    I can only speak for me but my guess is that the collective SDN community that cheered you last summer, is cheering for you again. WE believe in you Aero. For whatever it's worth, *I* believe in you. I think I've overcome adversity, and then I think of you - you are one of the strongest people I *know* ...

    Thank you! And I appreciate it Ad2b. I have one shot and only one shot left. I am hoping this year is much better. If not, I am going to sit here in my lovely home in Augusta and write some books.
     
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    longleat11

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    Incoming M1 at Sinai here. Based on what I've seen, heard, and researched, Sinai might just be one of the most welcoming schools for LGBTQ folks. That being said, I think your strongest essay for this topic would be one where you could point to several concrete examples as to how your passion drove you into action.
     

    tantacles

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    If being LGBT has resulted in an increase in your insight, your passion for medicine, or your perspective in such a way that you could spin it to relate to medicine, I would describe that. If not, I would strongly suggest that while you feel free to casually bring up your sexual orientation on the interview trail, it probably doesn't hold much of a place in an application. People who have experienced abuse or fear because of their sexual orientation often have a lot to speak about even if they haven't done much related to being LGBT in terms of activism or activities, but it sounds (and correct me if I'm wrong) as if you've either been hiding your sexual orientation and hadn't given much thought to it before, or that you simply realized later than most people that you were LGBT. There is no shame in figuring out things late. However, in terms of adding value to a medical school class, unless being closeted provided you with tremendous insight, being LGBT probably won't be tremendously helpful to your application.
     
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