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Mentioning dungeons and dragons in a secondary about critical thinking?

SpanishMusical

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Hey all,

So this is about Duke's secondary question (I'm prewriting): Critical thinking involves a number of characteristics including creativity, innovation, discernment, emotional intelligence, application and analysis. Describe a situation in which you utilized critical thinking. Why is critical thinking vital in your future?

I was trying to think of good examples and honestly, the more I though about it, the better DND seemed to be. I recently led a one-off campaign (a single 4-hour session) with some of my friends, and I had to be creative (in choosing the scenario, plot, etc.), discerning (how do I keep from killing everyone while still making the session challenging), use some emotional intelligence (how would this character react in this scenario), I had to apply what I read (what challenge ratings made sense for the group to fight; how could the opponents use their spells), and I had to analyze things (how are people liking the session? What should I change?)

Of course, I could also talk about designing a research project, where I had to plan things out, determine what data to use, figure out how to balance my needs with the labs', learn new tools, etc. etc.

Thoughts on which may be better? I'm leaning towards the research one, just because it checks a lot of those critical thinking boxes and it is pretty impressive what I've put together (at least, I think), but I'm curious to hear others' opinions, especially since DND would be unique (although I don't know if it would be in the right way). @Goro @LizzyM
 
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Hey all,

So this is about Duke's secondary question (I'm prewriting): Critical thinking involves a number of characteristics including creativity, innovation, discernment, emotional intelligence, application and analysis. Describe a situation in which you utilized critical thinking. Why is critical thinking vital in your future?

I was trying to think of good examples and honestly, the more I though about it, the better DND seemed to be. I recently led a one-off campaign (a single 4-hour session) with some of my friends, and I had to be creative (in choosing the scenario, plot, etc.), discerning (how do I keep from killing everyone while still making the session challenging), use some emotional intelligence (how would this character react in this scenario), I had to apply what I read (what challenge ratings made sense for the group to fight; how could the opponents use their spells), and I had to analyze things (how are people liking the session? What should I change?)

Of course, I could also talk about designing a research project, where I had to plan things out, determine what data to use, figure out how to balance my needs with the labs', learn new tools, etc. etc.

Thoughts on which may be better? I'm leaning towards the research one, just because it checks a lot of those critical thinking boxes and it is pretty impressive what I've put together (at least, I think), but I'm curious to hear others' opinions, especially since DND would be unique (although I don't know if it would be in the right way). @Goro @LizzyM
As someone who enjoys playing board style war games, I could appreciate this.
 
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Med Ed

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Hey all,

So this is about Duke's secondary question (I'm prewriting): Critical thinking involves a number of characteristics including creativity, innovation, discernment, emotional intelligence, application and analysis. Describe a situation in which you utilized critical thinking. Why is critical thinking vital in your future?

I was trying to think of good examples and honestly, the more I though about it, the better DND seemed to be. I recently led a one-off campaign (a single 4-hour session) with some of my friends, and I had to be creative (in choosing the scenario, plot, etc.), discerning (how do I keep from killing everyone while still making the session challenging), use some emotional intelligence (how would this character react in this scenario), I had to apply what I read (what challenge ratings made sense for the group to fight; how could the opponents use their spells), and I had to analyze things (how are people liking the session? What should I change?)

Of course, I could also talk about designing a research project, where I had to plan things out, determine what data to use, figure out how to balance my needs with the labs', learn new tools, etc. etc.

Thoughts on which may be better? I'm leaning towards the research one, just because it checks a lot of those critical thinking boxes and it is pretty impressive what I've put together (at least, I think), but I'm curious to hear others' opinions, especially since DND would be unique (although I don't know if it would be in the right way). @Goro @LizzyM

As this thread nicely illustrates, if your question is read by some D&D fans it may evoke a positive reaction. But I can just as easily see the reaction being neutral or negative. It's a risk. Personally I'd stick with the research angle.
 
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GreenDuck12

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I agree, go for it. Being unique isn't a bad thing. Focus on the things that make it a more easily understood experience. As an aside, I remember being asked a question about who I would like to meet if I could meet anyone. Without missing a beat I replied "George R. R. Martin because I want to know how GoT is actually supposed to actually end." We spent the next few minutes talking about GoT.
 
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