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moonlighting question

Discussion in 'Clinical Rotations' started by Halaljello, Jan 12, 2002.

  1. Halaljello

    Halaljello Hot Oil

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    with many residents working 80+ hours a week, how do they find the time and energy to work extra shifts at other hospitals?
     
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  3. Whisker Barrel Cortex

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    I believe many of them do moonlighting on rotations that are less intensive. For example, a medicine resident on an allergy elective has plenty of time to make some extra cash.
     
  4. Halaljello

    Halaljello Hot Oil

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  5. Becket

    Becket Senior Member

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    Med students don't make money. The poster was referring to residents, not students.
     
  6. Whisker Barrel Cortex

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    Yes, I was referring to residents. In all residencies you "rotate" through different topics or subspecialties. Either once a month or every other month you will be doing another part of your specialty. Medicine residents generally do 6-10 months of general ward medicine (depending on program and year). The rest of the time is spent in cardiology, GI, rheumatology, endocrine, etc. Some of these are inpatient services which generally means being on call and working weekends. Some are ambulatory, which means 8-5 weekdays only.

    This is true in other specialties as well: Surgery (general, CT, transplant, laprascopic, etc), Ortho (general surgery, orhto trauma, etc.), Radiology (Neuro CT/MR, body CT/MR, Interventional, chest, ultrasound, etc). You get the point. By nature, some are more time intensive than others.
     
  7. Knight

    Knight Junior Member

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    Even if you are currently doing a lighter rotation, doesn't it also depend on whether there happens to be ERs that need moonlighters, and whether the shifts that they need people will fit your schedule (in evenings and weekends when you can moonlight)?

    What I am wondering is: will someone be able to moonlight even if he has the time and permission from his program? What is the experience of people in this forum who have moonlight before?
     
  8. Mango

    Mango Very Senior Member

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    Can you moonlight before you pass step 3? And if so, remind me again what the purpose of step 3 is anyway?
     
  9. Whisker Barrel Cortex

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    Although I'm not a resident, I'm a fourth year medical student who has had 15 interviews so far and talked to many residents about moonlighting. My sister is also a 4th year OB/GYN resident who moonlights.

    In order to moonlight, you need the time, the permission (sometimes not explicit) of your program, and the opportunities. If your program gives permission and previous residents have moonlighted, this usually means there are opportunities in that area. A lot of times the residents from a program have an inside track to a certain opportunity. Meaning that many of their residents go to a certain hospital or facility and this facility almost expects it. From what I have seen, maybe 20 percent of places have this. About half of the places I've interviewed, there is little or no opportunity to moonlight.

    Step III is required for licensing (at least in my state and my sister's, I'm not sure about others). Licensing is needed for moonlighting in most states, if not all.
     
  10. Freeeedom!

    Freeeedom! Senior Member

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    Just thought I would add this...the ability to moonlight in an ED as a resident is rapidly dissolving. ED's typically will not hire anyone prior to their 2nd or 3rd year of residency to moonlight, even if they are EM residents. So don't depend on moonlighing in the ED if you are medical student soon to graduate.
     
  11. Whisker Barrel Cortex

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    There are still many EDs (Veteran's Hospitals especially) and many urgent care facilities that accept 2nd and 3rd year residents. My sister has an OB/GYN moonlighting opportunity as well as ER in southern california.

    Radiology residents in some locations have abundant moonlighting opportunities in radiology because of the shortage of radiologists these days.
     
  12. Freeeedom!

    Freeeedom! Senior Member

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    I probably didn't clarify my statement very well. The ACEP, SAEM, and AAEM have been lobbying to prevent what they see as "underqualified" personnel from moonlighting in ED's whether they be rural or not...they see anyone not specifically trained and certified in EM as falling into this category. But, if you are an EM resident in your 2nd or 3rd year, most ED's will preferentially hire you to "moonlight" in the ED over any other resident...far and away. But even this practice is limited.

    Other moonlighting opportunities such as Urgent Care, residency specific clinics, "beeper call" etc are still highly available.
     
  13. osteogal

    osteogal Junior Member

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    Does anyone know which specialties offer moonlighting? I know of emergency and internal medicine. Any others? Thanks.
     

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