Aug 12, 2011
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The Windy City
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Here's a question. I'm a US medical student and I have a former coworker from Australia who is asking me this question. I have no idea, but I figured you guys might know.

If you were raised in Australia and are medically trained in Australia (U of Adelaide), are you at a disadvantage if you plan to move to the US for your residency? If you are a US citizen who moves to AUS for med school and then come back to the states to practice, you are at a disadvantage because you are considered an IMG who couldn't get into med school in the states. But if you are an Australian to begin with, is there less of a disadvantage? Will you be considered equal to US grads?

Thanks in advance, I am also genuinely curious.
 

Leforte

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Feb 2, 2004
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As a US IMG who went to medical school in Australia, as long as there is a good reason for going overseas, the disadvantage may only be relevant in highly competitive specialties. We know that medical school admissions are tough, and what State you are from (and the # of applicants to positions), has a big factor on who gets in. As long as you do we'll on your USMLEs, have some research, etc, you should be fine to match in most specialties.

As a non-US citizen IMG, things are more difficult because there is the whole Visa thing. No program wants to be short a resident for a month-year, if not longer because of Visa issues. It is simply not worth the risk to many (but not all) programs. Especially if there are equally qualified US trained applicants. Some programs and specialties are more lenient. Some have never taken an IMG, US citizen or not.

What I would caution your friend, however, is that if they choose to get their training in the US, it will become difficult for them to return as a specialist in Australia. Their specialty training will need to assessed by the relevant College, and they may need to have a period of supervision, remedial training, take the fellowship exams, or all three. Their training may even not be recognised. I would seriously look at the Australian College that corresponds to their specialty of interest and make inquiries before going that route.

Also, depending on their Visa to come to the US for training, they may be required to return to their home country following completion of their medical training, and not allowed to practice as an attending.

Things to think about.
 

Medstart108

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Mar 24, 2012
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Here's a question. I'm a US medical student and I have a former coworker from Australia who is asking me this question. I have no idea, but I figured you guys might know.

If you were raised in Australia and are medically trained in Australia (U of Adelaide), are you at a disadvantage if you plan to move to the US for your residency? If you are a US citizen who moves to AUS for med school and then come back to the states to practice, you are at a disadvantage because you are considered an IMG who couldn't get into med school in the states. But if you are an Australian to begin with, is there less of a disadvantage? Will you be considered equal to US grads?

Thanks in advance, I am also genuinely curious.
There is actually possibly more of a disadvantage. It lies with visa issues. A lot of programs don't want to sponsor a non us citizen img because they would require a visa.
There are 2 types of visas J1 and H1B. A J1 will allow you to do residency in the US but will force you to return to your country for 2 years before allowing you to reapply. An H1B will allow you to work and lets you on a pathway to citizenship ( the best option if you want to stay in the US).

A lot of hospitals won't want to sponsor a H1B, more are willing to sponsor a J1. H1B's require more paperwork and more hassle. They would want to avoid that unless your stats are superior to a US grad.
 
Mar 21, 2013
4
0
Status
Medical Student
Here's a question. I'm a US medical student and I have a former coworker from Australia who is asking me this question. I have no idea, but I figured you guys might know.

If you were raised in Australia and are medically trained in Australia (U of Adelaide), are you at a disadvantage if you plan to move to the US for your residency? If you are a US citizen who moves to AUS for med school and then come back to the states to practice, you are at a disadvantage because you are considered an IMG who couldn't get into med school in the states. But if you are an Australian to begin with, is there less of a disadvantage? Will you be considered equal to US grads?

Thanks in advance, I am also genuinely curious.

There is a major disadvantage to becoming an IMG, also more US schools are opening up, and the system will favor people who were educated in the US. You also have to consider visa and immigration issues.