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MPH during residency

Discussion in 'Public Health Degrees (Masters and Doctoral)' started by velouria, Apr 28, 2004.

  1. velouria

    velouria Senior Member
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    Hi,
    I understand that doing an MPH is required during some residency programs (preventive medicine, specifically; also perhaps during some infectious disease fellowships?).
    If you do something like this, do you still have to pay tuition for the MPH?
    Just curious.

    Thanks!
     
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  3. FoughtFyr

    FoughtFyr SDN Lifetime Donor
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    Not usually. Most places that require the MPH as part of the residency have it worked out with the SPH so that tuition is waived. Books, on the other hand, are sometimes not paid for...

    - H
     
  4. velouria

    velouria Senior Member
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    Now that's what I like to hear...

    :)
     
  5. Hi everyone,
    I have a question about MPH programs during residency in general. Even if the MPH is not required for the particular residency, can it still be done? If so, is it paid for by the residency program?

    Also, has anyone gotten their MPH during medical school, i.e. between the 2nd and 3rd or 3rd and 4th years ?

    Any comments re: pros/cons for getting your MPH during medical school vs. during residency?

    Thanks! :)
     
  6. edfig99

    Physician Faculty 15+ Year Member

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    if the MPH is not required for the residency then in general, a residency program will not flip the bill. They also are not obligated to pay your stipend while you are not involved in residency activities. Some residencies, however, may offer some type of program where they have grant money to fund your mph and a year off. Columbia for example, has the "Patient Oriented Research" track within their internal medicine residency. I don't know too many details about it, except they have quite a few 2nd year residents take a year off, get an MS (I think) and then head back to finish off residency.

    There are some programs that will pay for your MPH degree during medical school, the most notable one I know of at least here in NY (not sure if it's elsewhere) is the Macy's Scholars program. Most of the Macy Scholars I know take off between 2nd and 3rd year, or 3rd and 4th.

    Personally, I think the MPH makes most sense after residency after you have a better sense of the problems that need to be addressed and you have some experience (some MPH programs may require a certain amount of experience prior to enrollment - Health Promotions, Sociomedical Sciences). Some MPH concentrations however, may not really matter/care as to when you study or what experience you may have (i.e. Epi or Biostats).

    hth
     
  7. Thanks for the great info Edgar. There seem to be benefits to any order (i.e. MPH before, during, or after med school). Yours make sense. I have also read that having your MPH as you enter medical school is good because you are already in the 'public health' mindset; I am not sure what this means. Either way, the two degrees seem to go hand in hand and I am definitely considering getting a MPH with a M.D. I graduated from NYU undergrad as well by the way! :)
     
  8. Heal&Teach

    Heal&Teach cogito ergo sum
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    From someone in the 'public health mindset': this phrase just means that you may approach problems differently based on your training... just as someone with a 'business mindset' may look at things from a financial/economic standpoint versus a socio-behavioral or clinical one. It is the ability to integrate these 'mindsets', per se, in order to maximize your problem solving skills, that can be important in your learning and development as a physician. However, this 'mindset' will take you but so far, as much of the public health you'll get will be drowned out by your basic science training - which is okay. The only way you'll see much public health outside a basic epi/biostats course in med school is if you're involved in some community or public health project or research. Obtaining the MPH during school may afford you the time explore different areas of public health so that you are able to address certain issues from a different orientation (e.g., talking to a diabetic patient about improving their lifestyle to support the ongoing prevention of cardiovascular disease), but for the most part, you need to have your science down. So get into school, be both scientifically and clincally oriented, and later on down the line when you've mastered those aspects of medicine - incorporate the public health that you've learned from your degree.
     
  9. Thank you for explaining this mindset further Heal&Teach- greatly appreciated! :) . I will definitely keep your words in mind.
     

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