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Mr./Ms./Mrs. to ... Dr., when...?

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SCRdoc

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I hope this isn't a dumb question. But, I was just wondering. At what point do people add the title "Dr." to their names? Is it right after med school or after residency? I ask this 'cos right after med school, one is still a "doctor in training". Or maybe you need to get a license before you add the title :confused:. Any thoughts?
 
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njbmd

I hope this isn't a dumb question. But, I was just wondering. At what point do people add the title "Dr." to their names? Is it right after med school or after residency? I ask this 'cos right after med school, one is still a "doctor in training". Or maybe you need to get a license before you add the title :confused:. Any thoughts?

Once a doctorate (in any field) is earned, the person may use the title. That being said, only physicians licensed in this country can practice medicine period. Those folks who have graduated from medical school and are currently in residency, have a training (limited) license until they apply for (and are granted) a permanent license (after passing all three steps of licensure exam). There is no "doctor in training" title in this country.
 

nimbusadjust120

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I hope this isn't a dumb question. But, I was just wondering. At what point do people add the title "Dr." to their names? Is it right after med school or after residency? I ask this 'cos right after med school, one is still a "doctor in training". Or maybe you need to get a license before you add the title :confused:. Any thoughts?

Once you have graduated from medical school and received your MD, you are a doctor. "Doctor in training" is known as "junior doctor". ;) They are also known as house officer, medical officer or registrar.
 

SB100

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"Come on newbie, are you a real doctor or a doctor like Julius Erving is a doctor?"
 

MossPoh

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As already stated. It is generally once you have received the degree. That being said, once in a while I've heard students be called "doctor" more for convenience and peace of mind around the patients. You should see the look of discomfort in some patients' eyes as they are told a student is about to do a procedure on them.... moderately humorous.
 
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135892

I hope this isn't a dumb question. But, I was just wondering. At what point do people add the title "Dr." to their names? Is it right after med school or after residency? I ask this 'cos right after med school, one is still a "doctor in training". Or maybe you need to get a license before you add the title :confused:. Any thoughts?

This is a dumb question...
 

littlealex

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I think the general consensus is that after your intern year, you are officially a doctor. Just a bottom of the food chain know-nothing doctor, but a doctor.
 

Hurricane95

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You are technically "Dr." in title after graduation...

I know several residents who are real cool (some of them recently former classmates) who go on first name basis with us like nothing happened (it would be kind of weird to place a sudden status barrier when I know them so well) but to patients they are still "Dr. so-and-so"
 

UCLAMAN

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I think the general consensus is that after your intern year, you are officially a doctor. Just a bottom of the food chain know-nothing doctor, but a doctor.

actually, as others have pointed out, you are a doctor as soon as you graduate medical school. so as an intern, you are a doctor. as an intern you are prescribing medications, your patients refer to you as doctor, you are indeed...a doctor. Its actually pretty weird to see your name as Dr. so and so on your patient's bottle of prescription of pills.

you are indeed at the bottom of the food chain(and have the least amount of clinical experience) as an intern. but don't get it twisted, you are a doctor.
 

MattD

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I hope this isn't a dumb question. But, I was just wondering. At what point do people add the title "Dr." to their names? Is it right after med school or after residency? I ask this 'cos right after med school, one is still a "doctor in training". Or maybe you need to get a license before you add the title :confused:. Any thoughts?

It's like 007... you need 2 kills
 

Doctor

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I'm a Doctor, perhaps even the Doctor around here, and haven't graduated from a medical school. So this seems to fly in the face of what everyone else has stated here.

All the best,
Doctor

PS - Email me if you need me to perform surgeries on you. I don't even believe in sterile operating environments, so we can meet up at the park, a public restroom, etc. Just remember to bring a friend because you won't be walking home and there may be a lot of blood.


It's like 007... you need 2 kills
Is there any extra credit for having more than that amount?
 

ESzczesniak

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That being said, once in a while I've heard students be called "doctor" more for convenience and peace of mind around the patients.

I'm a second year and have one attending that insists on calling me doctor...not sure why, but it kind of bothers me actually. Just doesn't feel right.
 
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