My wicked sick PAT tutorial

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Sama951

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Ok, so, because I have an english midterm tomorrow that I don't want to study for, and because there's 600 posts about how impossible TFE is, and also because I'm good at TFE and feel like being a hero, I'm gonna make a little tutorial where I post a couple of them and talk you through the answer! After I do that, you can scan/post any other ones you want and I'll do my best to explain them. I don't use any weird strategies, I just look at the lines and visualize it in 3D. The tips and tricks you hear about might help narrow it down in some cases but if you can visualize it properly you'll be able to get every question every time.

Oh and excuse the fact that there's writing all over my examples, haha.

Ok first one..
Original.jpg


Alright this is a good example for explaining what solid and dashed lines mean.

I assume everyone knows what the different views represent... If not then think of it this way... Imagine a person looking into a camera lens.

A straight up mugshot of the person's face is a "Front" view. Now if you take the camera and move it up, then pivot it and aim it downwards, you've got a "Top" view. Now for the end view, take the camera and put it back in front of the person's face...then you'd take a side-shot of the person's left cheek (but since you're the camera man and you're facing them, you're moving the camera to your right side).

Ok great.

First, looking at the top view, you have one solid line that goes all the way across, from left to right. That means that from a side view, you're only going to have one change in height. Now remember that a straight line like that can mean a straight up drop in height, or it can mean there's a slope with a gradual decline. Looking at all the answers though, it's pretty obvious that we're not looking at any slopes. However, every one of the answers has a single drop in elevation on the top part, so that little bit of information isn't going to narrow it down too dramatically. But... dun dun dun.. look at choice C. Choice C does have a drop in elevation at the top, which is what we decided we're looking for, but it's got the drop at the position of one of the dashed lines (you can tell by the position and thickness of the notch). That's bad! I'm sure this is a trap some people fall into, but yeah, don't. Look at "Fig 1" to see which solid line I'm talking about and where it corresponds to a drop in height in each of the answers (green). Red line = danger = don't fricken do it. Dashed lines do not represent any changes in elevation on the surface they appear on (did that make sense?). Dashed lines are there to show you that there's some kind of height difference deeper into the object, or on the other side all together (what I mean is, it could be a hole that passes through the middle of the object, I'll explain more later if I find an example)

Fig 1
Fig1.jpg


On to the dashed lines we go.

So we've got three horizontal dashed lines on the top view. That means that somewhere in the object, you've got at least 3 extra "walls" (you'll see why I say 'at least' in a second). In other words, there's some kind of height change somewhere that isnt visible from the top. Based on the relative positions of the lines, you'll be able to figure out where the 'height' differences are supposed to be.

Let's compare this to the answer choices. Choice A has 3 walls that you cant see from the top view, D has 4. However, look at the orange line in Fig 2 with the question mark. This wall is lined up perfectly with the blue height change that we discussed above. Because of this, its dashed lines won't show up in the top view (for no reason other than the fact that if you draw a solid line on top of a dashed line...you get a solid line :D).

All the walls are spaced apart proportionally to the dashed lines in the top view of the original figure in A and D. Look at B though, it only has 2 of these "walls" that we established you couldn't see from the top. Look at Fig 2. Green = good, red = bad, blue = done, orange = tricky POS.


Fig 2
Fig2.jpg


Great, so we've narrowed it down to A or D. We've done about all we can do with the top view so let's go to the front view. Here we've got 2 solid lines, so from a head-on view, there's 2 height changes. From everything I've said so far about the top view, this should be really easy to figure out, so I'm just gonna include a final figure (green = solid lines and what they correspond with, blue = stuff we already talked about, red = why D is wrong, and orange = dashed lines and what they correspond to)

Notice also how high up the notches go in D, I've highlighted them in red. You should notice that these are way, way higher up than the dashed lines on the front view, so that's another way to eliminate it.

Fig 3
Fig3.jpg


Alright so after all that we can safely conclude that the answer is indeed C.



Just kidding...:rolleyes:.......It's A.

So yeah, that took way longer than I thought it would and I'm thinking it might have been too simple of an example to be helpful... I hope it helps someone though. If someone can find a really hard one they want me to go through post it here.

Oh crap.. exam tomorrow:scared:
 
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Deontologist

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Wow......thats indeed wicked.....Lol..!!
awesome tutoring..!! I am sure You will do good on your English mid-terms tomorrow.....!

Thanks..!!
 

gkhan

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great work,

i remember doing these in 7/8 grade technology
you totally saved me time when icome to this part now :)

p.s. just got done with tissues/enzymes/cells i'll probably go for another hour before its bed time :)

going to go to UMDNJ tommorow (or today i should say)
peace
 

doc3232

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How about some of those cube things, NOT cube counting (last part of the PAT section where figures are put together from a planar sheet and it has colors on it sometimes). If you have time that is.
Thanks
 

IDontUnderstand

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Hey, It's Sama951

Sure, I'll try to do both

Why don't you guys post an example of one you find tough (for cube counting try to find an optical illusion or something)

Oh, but you have to wait until I get my account unbanned for "spam advertising" (??????????????????????:confused:?????:confused:)
 

Jaba

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Hey, It's Sama951

Sure, I'll try to do both

Why don't you guys post an example of one you find tough (for cube counting try to find an optical illusion or something)

Oh, but you have to wait until I get my account unbanned for "spam advertising" (??????????????????????:confused:?????:confused:)

why is this spam advertising.... its a tutoriaL!!!
what the hell.
 

IDontUnderstand

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no it was for a different post

someone else posted a spam advertisement on the pre dental forum and i commented on it (i didnt advertise anything though, i made fun of the post) and got banned for spam advertising lol. I didnt know that was against the TOS so hopefully I get it cleared up
 
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osimsDDS

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You could also count the lines which would take 30 seconds....That what I do works like 13 out of 15 times, for the ones it doesnt you have to start to think haha
 

Jaba

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You could also count the lines which would take 30 seconds....That what I do works like 13 out of 15 times, for the ones it doesnt you have to start to think haha

yaa that works.... but is it so on the real dat too?
 

IDontUnderstand

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You could also count the lines which would take 30 seconds....That what I do works like 13 out of 15 times, for the ones it doesnt you have to start to think haha


Yeah like I said there are other ways of doing it, but they're not as reliable as using your perceptual ability....! :D

This was a tutorial explaining the basics in detail. Once you get this you can go on and apply it to other examples and, with practise, master this section completely. Why get 13/15 when you can get 15/15! It doesn't take long for it to click haha.
 

Sama951

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I'm back yo.

And by request, here's my pattern folding tutorial .

First off I wanna go over a special case that comes up on every DAT (or at least every practise test I've ever done) - and that is the figures that look rediculously hard but take about 4 seconds to figure out.

Here's the example:

Fig 1
Original2.jpg


So you look at this and think ohmagad that's so many folds, but in reality it does not get any easier than this because of a simple trick. The first thing you should do is identify the biggest or most "different" side. I've outlined this special magical side in green in Fig 2 so you know what I'm talking about. Usually in these questions, once you find this side, you can just compare the shape of that side to all of the answer choices and pick out the right answer (which is A here). This one's got a very minor twist though, choice B has sides that are the same shape as our special side, the problem is B has 4 of them and the unfolded shape only has 2. Look at Fig 2 to see what I mean.

Fig 2
Easy1.jpg


The next type that almost always comes up once or twice is the unfolded die... like this one:

Fig 3
diceorig.jpg


These always have a side with 4 other sides directly attached to it when completely unfolded (it's the side with 5 dots in this example). It's pretty easy to use this side as a reference, keeping in mind that the side that's 2 squares away from it (the 4 here) is on the opposite face of the die.

In my explanation I'm gonna say top/front/right - Fig 4 shows what I mean.

Fig 4
dice0.jpg


The first thing you should do is take a quick glance at the answer choices and see if you can eliminate any seriously defective choices. "A" stands out right away in this example because the "1" side's dot is off in the corner somewhere (see Fig 5). Actually, I just noticed that the "3" side to the right of the "1" in A is crippled as well, so yeah please refrain from choosing A.

Fig 5
dice1.jpg


Alright after this, the easiest way to do these questions is to go straight to the answer choices and compare them to the unfolded figure. Let's start with C. On the front, we've got a 5, and to its right we've got a 2. That works so far, looking at the unfolded pattern (tilt your head to the right if you don't see it). However, on the top of C you've got a 1 - looking again at the unfolded pattern you can see that in order for 2 to be to the right of 5, there has to be a 6 on top, not a 1. So yeah, C's out. Take a look at Fig 6 to see this in picture form. Red = does not work, green = does work.

Fig 6
dice2.jpg



D is a tiny bit more difficult to look at because it brings the "4" side into the picture which isnt directly attached to the central "5" side in the unfolded pattern. No matter, it's just a simple cube, you should be able to figure out that it's going to be attached to everything but the 5, which is on the opposite face.

If you can convince yourself that the following is true, it's a really cool way to think about this: On the completed cube, when looking straight at the "5" side, you're going to have a 6 on the right and a 1 on the left. Well, if you rotate the cube towards yourself so you're staring at the 4 side, you still have a 6 on your right and a 1 on your left. The only sides that have reversed are going to be the top and bottom (simply because you turned it upside down). So, basically, if you want, you can imagine the 4 in the 5's position, just switch the top and bottom numbers.

Anyways, yeah, after all that, D is wrong too.

That leaves us with B which cllllllllearly has to be the answer. You've got a 5 in the front, a 6 on the right, and a 3 on top, just like in the unfolded pattern.

The last type I wanna talk about are the simple shapes with differently colored sides that make seem a zillion times more painful, such as:

Fig 7
cubeorig.jpg


Alright so, it's a nice simple happy cube. The only reason these are harder than the dice is because you're not just looking at numbered sides, you're looking for the orientation of the lines. I guess, having mentioned that, there could be some rather tricky dice questions where you also have to be worried about the sides that could have different orientations (like the 3, for example. In the previous example if you take a look at the "3" side in the unfolded pattern you'll notice that the tip of the 'triangle' formed by the 3 dots is touching the "5" side while the 2 dots that form the 'base' of the triangle are going to be touching the "4" side. Something like this could come into play on a dice question at some point so watch out).

Alright so, anyways, let's make an executive decision and designate that central side as the top and the opposite side as the bottom, see Fig 8.

Fig 8
cubetopbot.jpg


Great. For these, just like the dice, I always go straight to the answers and compare them to the unfolded one. Since we established that the central white side is the top, you can tell right away that, once the sides get folded into the paper (and you put it on a table), all 3 colored sides will be on the "perimeter" of the cube. We can run with this info and eliminate A and D right away because, based on what I just said, there really is no way you should be able to see all 3 of the colored sides when you're looking straight at the cube. This leaves B and C.

Before we go any further, I'd like to point something out. Look at the original figure, specifically the top and left flaps (no particular reason for choosing these, I just want to explain a point). Ok so, on these unfolded flaps, you've got horizontal black and white lines, with the black line on top and the white line on the bottom of both flaps. Keep in mind however that, when folded into the paper, these lines won't look the same. Take a look at Fig 9.

Fig 9
cubewhiteline.jpg


When that top flap gets folded down along the green line, it's going to be allllll white contacting that side of the designated "top" of our figure. The left side however, has both black and white touching the "top". Now look over to the right, same deal as the left flap. What can we conclude from this? B IS WRONG!!! .

Now, because this is hard as hell to explain, and you've seen the basics, I'll just provide a color coded outline of why C is correct (Fig 10).

Fig 10
cubeanswer.jpg


Wouldn't it be cute if after all that I actually got one of these wrong?...

Anyways yeah, hope that helped someone, if it wasnt what you were looking for please supply me with an example to explain.
 
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boxdesker

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Congratulations, you are officially my hero. The only thing we gotta do now, is get you out of Canada.
 
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gkhan

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great work once again, i haven't really started with teh PAT part so this is all new stuff to me, i merely glanced at the section.
this is going to help LOADS.
 

Neuro178

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This is great! I liked your TFE explanation, but I think I am still TFE-challenged. It is the only section that I really really can't do. :scared:
 

vvvv

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how do I add the picture into my post, it keeps saying my pic is too big, but actually is smaller than all the picture in this thread.
 

DRHOYA

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Awesome demonstrations man! I love the phrase "its just a happy cube". Anyway, are you any good with Angle Ranking?? Sometimes I get 15/15 and sometimes I get like 9-10/15.....you can PM me if you want.
 
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Sama951

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how do I add the picture into my post, it keeps saying my pic is too big, but actually is smaller than all the picture in this thread.

I uploaded all my pics to photobucket and then linked them here that way... Once you upload them, come here and click the little picture above the text box with a mountain and a sun on it and then do it that way.


Wow this was really really helpful! If you have time mind showing us more?

I can make time if you post an example for me to do :D
Glad it helped


Awesome demonstrations man! I love the phrase "its just a happy cube". Anyway, are you any good with Angle Ranking?? Sometimes I get 15/15 and sometimes I get like 9-10/15.....you can PM me if you want.

I'm the same as you - My last crack dat pat test I got 15/15 on every section and then like 10/15 on angles. I think you can practise that to a certain extent but it comes down to straight up having it/not having or just luck on the test because I have done it before and gotten 13 or 14... just not often lol.
 

sk06

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wow your tutorial for tfe is amazing! i'm sure the others are too but i havent read through them yet. could you explain to me what the dashed line in the front view means in your first tfe example? i kinda get how D is eliminated but i just want to be sure. thanks a bunch!
 

Sama951

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wow your tutorial for tfe is amazing! i'm sure the others are too but i havent read through them yet. could you explain to me what the dashed line in the front view means in your first tfe example? i kinda get how D is eliminated but i just want to be sure. thanks a bunch!


Sure, look at the very last picture and look at the front view - the dashed lines are highlighted in orange here and, if you take a look at A, the part that corresponds to the dashed line is also in orange (it's kinda small and easy to miss, so squint :D)
 

klutzy1987

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Thanks for the help but i was wondering if it was possible for you to shw how to solve a more difficult top/front/end problem. One where every view has lines going through it and there is no clear outline like the one you did had.
 

Sama951

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Thanks for the help but i was wondering if it was possible for you to shw how to solve a more difficult top/front/end problem. One where every view has lines going through it and there is no clear outline like the one you did had.


ya like I said before I'd do one but..I don't have one to do! find me a bad one and I'll do it
 

sk06

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Sure, look at the very last picture and look at the front view - the dashed lines are highlighted in orange here and, if you take a look at A, the part that corresponds to the dashed line is also in orange (it's kinda small and easy to miss, so squint :D)

oo ok i see it. thanks!
 

xDent09

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This THREAD IS REALLY WORTH IT THanks to SAMA, Guys please keep posting questions for the PAT here, it is very helpful, the problem I cant post a picture. Keep this running please, trust me its helping tons of people!!!
 

keypox

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yeah great work, but can someone please explain how to count lines? I think its good to know all the methods including the tricks lol
 

Sama951

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I got the following PM today so I thought I'd go over it here instead of just replying to it cuz i think it'll help more people:

Hey, nice tutorials..they really helped. Since i see your pretty good w PAT, i wanted to ask you a question i have about test 2 on crack dat pat.So...on test 2 questions 64-67 cube counting youll see a tower of 4 cubes. Behind it, however..i couldnt tell if there was a cube or not??? Cant there be a cube or there might not be?? I know the cubes are all connected (right?) but how can i tell if theres a cube behind the tower..it doesnt seem to make sense and it threw me off so i just assumed no cube (in the answers there is a cube) and i got them all wrong. If you see what im talking about let me know cause its not making sense to me (maybe just a little mistake but yea im not sure). Also, test 2 question 89 patterns..the answer says A but cant it be D depending on which way you fold the flaps (up or down)..how do we know which way to fold the object..according to the answer it would be folding down but you can just as easily fold them up. Ok thats it..these might be software mistakes or not..hope it doesnt happen on the real thing. Any help would be greatly appreciated..thanks so much

I'm gonna have to explain this in words because I don't think I can post the actual questions here (even if I could I wouldn't know how). If someone else could that would be wonderfultastic.

Anyways, if you'd all like to flip to question 64 and follow along, that would be swell. If you don't have the program, go buy it, its great.

The reality of this question is that yes, there is indeed a block behind that tower on the right. The reason there has to be a block there is because the structure has to be continuous all the way around. Without the block behind that tower, it would be two structures connected by the corners of those two blocks. Being connected by the corner doesnt count! If there was a block in the top-right corner of the structure however, you would assume that there is no block in the space behind the tower - because a block in the corner would make the structure continuous.

As far as the pattern folding section goes - you're right that if you folded the paper up towards yourself you'd get the other answer - but the rules for this section are that all folds have to be INTO the paper! Always fold away from yourself and don't get caught in that trap. Besides, how do you know theres the same pattern on the other side of that paper? What if there's a giant yellow octopus or something, THEN WHAT?!?!?!?

yeah great work, but can someone please explain how to count lines? I think its good to know all the methods including the tricks lol

If someone could do this with a picture or two that would be nice. I'd do it but I have no idea how the trick works and I reccomend not relying on them for all the questions.
 

hygiene101

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You could also count the lines which would take 30 seconds....That what I do works like 13 out of 15 times, for the ones it doesnt you have to start to think haha

What do you mean by " count the lines". ??? Can you explain please.
 

osimsDDS

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count the lines for top front end....so for example lets say they give you front and end view but not top view...what you can do is count the lines from left to right or right to left doesnt matter of the front view and then compare to the answers since the lines for the top view and front view have to match from left to right...

Then for end view count the lines from left to right but this time it will correspond to the lines for the top view from top to bottom...just imagine putting the top side of the end view to the right side of the top view and you will understand...

I will warn you it works for easy problems and some hard ones but it does not work for ALL...itll work 13/15 times but if you learn how to do both ways....counting lines and using perceptual ability you will ace this section of the PAT every time...
 
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hygiene101

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count the lines for top front end....so for example lets say they give you front and end view but not top view...what you can do is count the lines from left to right or right to left doesnt matter of the front view and then compare to the answers since the lines for the top view and front view have to match from left to right...

Then for end view count the lines from left to right but this time it will correspond to the lines for the top view from top to bottom...just imagine putting the top side of the end view to the right side of the top view and you will understand...

I will warn you it works for easy problems and some hard ones but it does not work for ALL...itll work 13/15 times but if you learn how to do both ways....counting lines and using perceptual ability you will ace this section of the PAT every time...

Thanks, I got it. It does save a lot of time!!!!!!!!1
 

hygiene101

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I uploaded all my pics to photobucket and then linked them here that way... Once you upload them, come here and click the little picture above the text box with a mountain and a sun on it and then do it that way.




I can make time if you post an example for me to do :D
Glad it helped




I'm the same as you - My last crack dat pat test I got 15/15 on every section and then like 10/15 on angles. I think you can practise that to a certain extent but it comes down to straight up having it/not having or just luck on the test because I have done it before and gotten 13 or 14... just not often lol.
I have really good ones but I don't know how to post them. Can you tell me how you posted yours.
 
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