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My wicked sick PAT tutorial

Discussion in 'DAT Discussions' started by Sama951, Jun 1, 2008.

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  1. Badboy8813

    Badboy8813 2+ Year Member

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    Jun 5, 2008
    i think i understand what you are saying but do you care to elaborate further on this
     
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  3. Sama951

    Sama951 2+ Year Member

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    Canada

    I think the best piece of advice for hole punching is definitely to work backwards. What the previous poster was saying was to draw a grid on your page/board/whatever so you can color in the holes as you unfold the diagram in your head. After you've drawn in all the holes onto your grid you can just look for which answer matches with the grid you drew. In my opinion this would be a great way to start learning the hole punching section but once you get the hang of it try to do it all in your mind because drawing a grid each time is very time consuming.
     
  4. Contach

    Contach 7+ Year Member

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    i find it helps me to look forward first, then go backwards.
    I do the folds in the order that they appear 1-->2-->3 so i am familiar with how the paper is folded. then i see where the holes are made. then I go backwards and unfold.. revealing new holes each time as in: 3-->2-->1.
     
  5. dentworld

    dentworld 2+ Year Member

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    I am sorry I tried to upload the pic with explanation, but it didn't work. I don't know how I can do that.
     
  6. 2thDMD

    2thDMD 10+ Year Member

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    Aug 15, 2007
    I will Photoshop an answer for you, but it will take me a day or so b/c I'm very detail oriented and want to give you as detailed an explanation as I can.

    PAT is my absolute favorite part of the whole test.
    If the DAT were 4 hours straight of nothing but PAT, I'd be in heaven.

    So, keep your eye on this post over the next couple of days and I'll see what I can swing.
     
  7. keliao

    keliao 2+ Year Member

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    Jun 10, 2008
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    i hate pattern folding .........i feel like i lose a lot of brain cells on this section....too early on the test to be feeling like this....sigh!!.....hate it hate it.....but idk i still do good on the CDP on this section...weird.......... arrrrhhgg....! still hate it.
     
  8. dcl222

    dcl222 5+ Year Member

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    Aug 13, 2008
    great PAT thread very stimulating... :]
     
  9. 2thDMD

    2thDMD 10+ Year Member

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    Aug 15, 2007
    This is for Keypox and some of the others on the forum who have been asking about "Line Counting."
    Keep in mind, Line Counting (most of the time) will help you narrow down your answers so that you can focus on the ones that are relevant.
    In rare cases, Line Counting will negate all answers but 1....but that is very rare.
    Sama951 has been doing a really good job explaining things verbally and sort of 2-D. It's hard to enough to see something clearly in your own brain, but it's even harder to then have to think of better words than "doo-hickey" and "thing-a-ma-jig" in verbal descriptions to get your point across to the viewer and get them to understand exactly what you are looking at/referencing in the picture at that moment.

    Having said that, I worked up a problem from this thread using Photoshop to give a little more "3-D"-ness to some people who are still uneasy about visualizing things this way and don't know what "Line Counting" is.
    I started off the tutorial at a VERY Basic level so that those who are too shy to ask about some of the things that most of us already know or take for granted, don't have to...they can just start from the beginning.
    So, here is a "Line Counting" tutorial compiled into about 10 pictures.

    I also worked up the Answer Figures in a 3-D animation/rendering program (that exports self-contained Flash videos), however Photobucket and some other sites are having trouble uploading them.
    So, if anybody would like to see 3-D animations of these particular answers, let me know.

    Justin (aka 2thDMD)

    P.S. I too am studying for the DAT and will (as Sama has) TRY to take time out of my busy study/work schedule to answer/explain problems posted to the board...but as we all know, studying for the DAT takes precedence.

    [​IMG]



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    Last edited: Jul 24, 2014
    KeepThankingHim, Ardwan and gec like this.
  10. polarmolar

    polarmolar 2+ Year Member

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    Jun 25, 2008
    amazinnnnnng!
     
  11. Sama951

    Sama951 2+ Year Member

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    Jesus Christ if people are still confused about TFE after that then I don't even know what to say

    I've never been so viciously upstaged but that's okay :p! Good job man
     
  12. 2thDMD

    2thDMD 10+ Year Member

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    Aug 15, 2007
    Sama951,

    My intentions were honorable and not to upstage, just give an overview of Line Counting to those that were asking about it. I took a very simple example from the thread and worked it up in Photoshop, Illustrator and Swift 3-D.
    I'm sure you'd have done the same if you had the same DTP programs.

    You had just as hard a job explaining some of those ridiculously convoluted TFE's, yet you were doing it 2-D and through the constriction of verbiage...which I think is harder than what I did.
    Some of the trickier ones you did I looked at and thought, "It's 'A'", or "Oh, it's obvious that it's C" only to have you explain through words alone why it wasn't. That was good.

    The only reasons I spent the time to do that massive workup is because I like explaining things to people and because I like working with those programs to create graphics/visuals for the purpose of display/teaching. Plus, I think when somebody has to explain something to another person, they wind up learning/understanding it a lot better because they not only have to think about it from their perspective (i.e.: their own thought process/patterns), but also have to think about how to go about explaining it in a way that multiple viewers can wrap their minds around...which takes more thought and "new eyes".

    I originally started doing this all in Flash and Swift 3-D so the thing would be entirely animated with demonstrations, 3-D transparent/outline cube rotations of the answers into/overlapping the given TOP VIEW and END VIEW,...buttons for navigation if you understood one principle, but wanted to see a confirmation/negation/explanation of another, etc., etc....
    But...I haven't used Flash in a couple of years and it was taking way too much time to relearn everything I've forgotten about Keyframes, Tweening, etc..
    So, I just decided to do it in Photoshop instead, because I did say that I would post a tutorial, but didn't want to back out of that just because I couldn't do it in my 1st choice format.
    At least this way I get to keep up on my Photoshop knowledge, and people who are interested can get a grass-roots explanation of Line Counting to refer to.

    If I didn't have to study for the DAT, I'd probably take a swipe at every TFE and Pattern-Fold put on the board...but, until my DAT is over, I'll have to refrain. I'll keep an eye on the board though to see if there are any simple one's I can bang out.

    2thDMD
     
    Last edited: Dec 23, 2008
  13. klutzy1987

    klutzy1987 StudyingSucks Letsgo Mets 5+ Year Member

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    I love TFE and dont have any problems with it, but I still think tht SAMA and you have done an amazing job with this. I will say Thank you for everyone that has a difficult time with TFE and is lucky enough to come accross this thread. You guys deserve a medal.
     
  14. IDK

    IDK 2+ Year Member

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    Aug 21, 2008
    Nice job 2thDMD:thumbup:

    I understand what you were going for; I did a similar thing for our undergrad biochem lab using animations made in flash/swift3d to explain concepts and then make little quizzes at end to test the students with. Visual and animated tutorials like these are a great addition to things explained in words/diagrams. But in the end the student should consider looking at the whole package as one isn't a substitute for the other.

    Anyways, props to anther graphic/web artist:)
     
  15. Sama951

    Sama951 2+ Year Member

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    hehe I was totally joking, your post rocks and I'm glad you made it. My DAT is coming up quick so I sort of disappeared from the boards... I'd really like to know whose idea it was to make the canadian dat on november 1st.. right in the middle of 5 midterms. Oh well we'll see what happens
     
  16. urDDS

    urDDS 2+ Year Member

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    Jul 24, 2008
    People who like pat, im retaking my dat in couple weeks and the folding is not getting into my head can someone help please please!!!!
     
  17. 2thDMD

    2thDMD 10+ Year Member

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    Dear urDDS,

    My DAT is in about 5 weeks, so I (like Sama) am kind of putting the boards on the back burner so that I too can study well.

    Having said that, I would recommend getting Crack DAT PAT.
    I believe that it has Pattern Folding animations that show how the answers go together and I think you can even rotate it in space to grasp it from all sides.
    I haven't used it in awhile because PAT is probably my strongest part, so I've been waiting until right before the test to polish up on that, and have been studying all the sciences now....but I'm pretty sure that that is one of the functions of the program (i.e.: animation of answers).

    I think that I remember something from Kaplan (little tips and tricks), and will TRY to do a little explanation....but DO NOT count on it.
    I would get CDP and also scour this message board (not just this thread) for anything that mentions Pattern Folding. There are a lot of smart people here and somebody might have already put pen to paper and posted a very nice explanation. It's worth a look, right?

    J.
     
  18. Sama951

    Sama951 2+ Year Member

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    Apr 14, 2008
    Canada

    Check pages 1 and 2 of this thread
     
  19. supraman

    supraman Boston Celtics 7+ Year Member

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    Oct 30, 2005
    [​IMG]

    This should come with a warning. The difficulty of this problem from 1 being easiest and 5 being hardest is a -3
     
  20. Sea of ASH

    Sea of ASH 2+ Year Member

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    Sep 15, 2007
    sama any tips on angle rankings?
     
  21. Sama951

    Sama951 2+ Year Member

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    Canada
    Nope. That section is gonna kick my ass haha sorry
     
  22. keliao

    keliao 2+ Year Member

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    2ThDMD ,,,,,u are amazingggggg!!!......that's a lot of work rite there.!! good job......
    i think you should offer kaplan and show them a portfolio of your PAT work and get some $$ ....lol...
     
  23. Sea of ASH

    Sea of ASH 2+ Year Member

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    Sep 15, 2007
    lol this is my worst section on PAT also :scared:
     
  24. 2thDMD

    2thDMD 10+ Year Member

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    Supraman,

    Very true. I was more interested in getting the concept across than trying to explain the concept AND a very visually confusing problem at the same time. I figured that once people understood the basic concept, then they could apply it to the harder problems and see if it was applicable to their specific figures/diagrams.

    2thDMD.
     
    Last edited: Sep 23, 2011
  25. 2thDMD

    2thDMD 10+ Year Member

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    Aug 15, 2007
    Keliao,

    I know, right?. I would actually probably contact Princeton Review first.
    I took Kaplan and, while their little White Book (sometimes referred to as Kaplan WB on the boards) had some good tips/tricks, I must say that the course fell way short of preparing me for my first DAT.
    Most of the DAT'ers that I've seen reporting back to the site with really good scores have kind of had a common thread or study method....which is, if you study as if you're taking the MCAT (i.e.: study MCAT books/materials...sans the Physics), that the DAT will be easier than had you just studied for the DAT.

    One of the most common books referenced by people who have done well on the DAT is the Princeton Review Hyperlearning MCAT Biological Sciences Review. I must concur. I've been going through it and it is very well written, very clear, and gives you questions that really make you think about the subject matter you are reading about (instead of just having you recall a rote answer). It is a far cry from my Kaplan WB and BB (Blue Book, which has a lot of information, but it's set up more for information/memorization as opposed to understanding the concepts behind the material...I mean, it explains the concepts as well, just not nearly as well...IMHO).

    It states in the Intro to the (Princeton MCAT) book, and I'm quoting directly here,
    "The majority of the questions are based on a Passage. This is text or graphics or both, presenting information from the various fields within the broad category of Biology. The Passage is representative of a textbook or article a medical student might have to read and understand.

    There are 3 types of questions. Type one tests memory: you walk in the door of the test room with the answer in your head. Type two tests your ability to process new information: you must get the answer straight from the passage. Type three tests your ability to combine what you know with the new information given in the Passage and solve a unique problem. The ratio of question types is 1:2:3, meaning that there are twice as many type twos as type ones, and three times as many as many type threes. That means only one out of six questions tests only straight-up factual knowledge." ​

    Now, REMEMBER, this is in reference to the MCAT, not the DAT.
    However, having taken the DAT twice and really studying (/memorizing) the second time around (and still feeling like I got my ass handed to me with some of the questions that still to this day I think were written in Sanskrit), I'm thinking that studying for the MCAT in order to take the DAT is the best way to go. Granted the author of the Princeton Review MCAT book states that a lot of the MCAT is based on Passages, so it sounds like the format is a little different, but I think that the principle of understanding how processes work, instead of just rote memorization is the better way to go. This may be like "well, duh" to some of you reading this, but I was kind of lead to believe that if I just memorized "How many NADH are produced in the 5th step of Glycolysis?", that I'd be fine...or memorizing what gets absorbed where in the nephron, that I'd be good to go on test day. Then I'd be taking the DAT and they'd whip a question on me like, "If something were to slightly constrict the efferent arteriole leading into the nephron, increasing pressure in the glomerulus and Bowman's Capsule, but leaving the afferent arteriole unaffected, what would be the effect on the filtrate concentration and the osmolarity in the ascending loop of Henle, with respect to Chlorine ions?". (For those of you who have not taken the DAT yet, don't worry, this isn't an actual question from the DAT. I'm just using it as an example of a really convoluted question I did get on my previous DAT that gave me pause).
    I just started the Princeton MCAT book and am only through 30+ pages, but I personally think that it is immensely more conducive to me doing well on the DAT than the Kaplan BB is/was. I mean, the Kaplan BB is chock full of information. It is roughly 980+ pages. I read and highlighted every page except for RC (and I have a unique highlighting system with 3 different highlighter colors indicating different levels of importance...so I put some time into reading/highlighting it). I made flashcards for every page and wound up with approximately 2,700 hand-written flashcards.
    So, you could say that I really put effort into learning all that material.
    However, it was more memorization and less "what would happen if?...." application....and as you know, being a doctor/dentist is more about everybody being unique and presenting with different problems, not textbook "one answer fits all" scenarios.
    I still walked out of the DAT thinking to myself, "Well how am I supposed to know how cyanide affects cytochrome C oxidase in the electron transport chain?"...and similar questions....I mean, none of my teachers ever went that in depth into anything.
    I was under the impression (from Kaplan, et. al.) that if I just memorized the basics (of say, the ETC)....its the last step in cellular respiration...NADH and FADH2 are high-energy electron carriers...Oxygen is the final electron acceptor, etc., etc., that I would be fine. Sooooooo not the case.
    I remember walking out of my first DAT thinking, "Did anybody get the number of that bus that just ran me over?" So, I studied (read: memorized) a lot more for the second DAT and only marginally increased my score.

    Now, after having read posts by members like CalGuitar, et. al., I started studying the Princeton book and have literally found myself thinking, "You know, I finally understand this particular biological process for the first time because of how this author writes and the thought-provoking questions he asks (mid-passage)." I just wish I had read this book first.
    In fairness to Kaplan, part of my (only slight) improvement in score the second time around might have been do in my part to the fact that I studied everything equally, not knowing that the ADA puts out a list of approximations as to the number of questions in each section/subsection. So, I was giving equal time to biomes, etc. that I was to cellular biology, when in fact the former has a total of like 1-2 questions out of the 40, and the latter has something like 10-13 questions out of the 40.
    Having said that, IMHO, the Princeton Review Hyperlearning MCAT Biological Sciences Review is a much better book to study for the DAT than the Kaplan DAT BB is...by far. Most of the Kaplan DAT BB questions at the end of the chapter have pretty easy, rote memorization answers with no real world situational relationship (i.e.: no "What would happen if?...." questions). The Princeton Review Hyperlearning MCAT Biological Sciences Review had a lot of those situational questions, so that I really got to understand the concepts from actual events that might happen (eg: what happens in the ETC if something doesn't get reduced/oxidized, etc., etc.). The Princeton Review Hyperlearning MCAT Biological Sciences Review got me to think about (and asked me about) the "why's" and "what if's" of Biological processes so that I actually understood the concepts, instead of just memorizing the basics. I can honestly say that the book was a page-turner and one of the most fun books I've ever read on the subject of Biology.

    Hope this helps some of you out there.

    Justin (2thDMD)
     
    Last edited: Dec 21, 2008
  26. keliao

    keliao 2+ Year Member

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    wow...i wish i knew about the Princeton R H MCAT a while back.........i finally set my test day...4 days away.!!!!!!!!!!

    Heu gus, btw how do you post files here.........they only allow me to attach files smaller than 400......***
     
    Last edited: Oct 8, 2008
  27. supraman

    supraman Boston Celtics 7+ Year Member

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    upload using www.imageshack.us, it will provide you with a link. Copy and paste it and then type the following:

    [​IMG]
     
  28. joedat41

    joedat41 5+ Year Member

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    you guys did a grat job with this thank you.
     
  29. toothfairy87

    toothfairy87 2+ Year Member

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    This is awesome!
    Thank you so much!
    If you have time can you please post another difficult top, front, end, side example????
    Thank you!
     
  30. sciencegod

    sciencegod Super Member 2+ Year Member

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    wondrful job! you're awesome!
     
  31. IdahoDoc

    IdahoDoc 7+ Year Member

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  32. polishp86

    polishp86 The Man, DDS 5+ Year Member

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    anyone know any other tricks for the top end front view questions (like counting the lines and having them be equal for top and end)? I take my DAT in 3 days...and I am decent at everything else but this...got to work on my timing still too! Do they give you subjects with subtimers? Or is it just one timer for each half of the test?

    Thanks!
     
  33. thedreamer

    thedreamer 2+ Year Member

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    Wow. Thank you!
     
  34. 2thDMD

    2thDMD 10+ Year Member

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    Aug 15, 2007

    Polishp86,

    I can't think of any other T-F-E "rules" off the top of my head.
    I have some obligations later this afternoon and evening, and work all day tomorrow, but will try and create another tutorial in the next couple of hours so that you'll have at least one more reference point before your test tomorrow. I'm very detail oriented and tend to spend extra time making things "just right." I bring that up because the next tutorial might not be as elaborate as the last one because that one took me a good 8 hours+++ (creating all the vector images in Adobe Illustrator, creating/positioning all the arrows/text in Photoshop, making sure everything coincided and made sense (logically and grammatically) etc., etc.)....and I just don't have that kind of time today or tomorrow.
    So, I'll see what I can do in the next couple of hours to give you another TFE rundown.

    While I'm creating the tutorial, here are some things to mull over regarding the test (since from your question it sounds like you've never even seen the actual test...which isn't a bad thing....but this quick synopsis and advice might come in handy so that you're not caught off guard when you actually start the test and you're seeing everything for the first time).

    As for timers on the test, each section (i.e.: SNS, PAT, RC, QR) has it's own timer. Sub-sections DO NOT have their own timers.
    • SNS - 100 Questions - 90 Minutes (you have roughly 54 seconds/question)
      • This section is broken down into Bio, Chem and OChem...in that order. The timer will start, your first 40 questions will be all Bio, then 41-70 will be all Chem, and 71-100 will be all OChem. It was nice of the DAT creators to not mix up all the questions as I think that would really throw some people off their game.
    • PAT - 90 Problems - 60 Minutes (40 seconds/question)
      • Key Holes
      • TFE
      • Angle Ranking
      • Hole-Punching
      • Cube-Counting
      • Pattern-Folding
    • Break - 15 Minutes (Optional)
    • RC - 50 Questions - 50 Minutes
    • QR - 40 Problems - 45 Minutes (68 seconds/question)

    For the SNS portion of the test, the Bio section will probably be your quickest, since it's straightforward Q&A. OChem will probably be a little slower because you're having to work out reaction mechanisms (among other things) in your head (or on the dry erase sheet they give you), so it's not just a simple word answer like the Bio section is. Gen Chem will probably take the longest because some of the questions (like working out molarities, Ksp's, etc.) will take you a minute (figuratively) to work out. So, chances are, the time you gain sailing through Bio will get utilized during Chem and OChem.

    Since it sounds like you haven't taken the test before, when you get to Prometric you'll need to have 2 forms of I.D. (a driver's license and something else with your name and signature on it (like an ATM card)). You'll go to the receptionist and tell them your name, what test you are there for and what time your appointment is. They'll have you sign in, have you put your things in a small locker (12" square...they provide the lock), and direct you to the inner receptionist who will take your I.D.'s, write in a log book, have you sign the log book, and take your right thumbprint and a facial picture. They'll give you two dry-erase sheets and an eraser, assign you a computer and walk you to it. The open-space testing rooms will have about 20-30 computers in their own cubicles (at least the Philly one does) and there'll be other people there taking all sort of tests (from Architecture to Zwahili, and everything in between...I'm being facetious, but only slightly. The reason I bring it up is that if you happen to see any of these other tests going on while you are being escorted to your computer and don't recognize what's on the screen, don't worry or let if freak you out because it's most likely not the DAT).

    You'll sit down at the computer and the proctor will hits some keys on the keyboard to log you in. It'll ask you some quick Yes/No questions like, "Is your name 'Bob Smith'?", etc. Then there will be a 15 minute tutorial on the test. If you have never even seen the DAT (or a simulation thereof), I would recommend doing the tutorial. If you have seen the tutorial, have taken some DAT-simulation tests, or have been told what to expect by your friends who have taken it, then I would either quickly run through it just as a cursory overview, or I would just let the time run down while you center yourself and get yourself in the test-taking mindset. You can end the tutorial at any time. If you do click the "End" button for the tutorial, it should ask you whether you are sure you want to end the tutorial. If you click "Yes", the test will begin (with Bio, as mentioned above). Each section should have a little mini-tutorial applicable to that section. If you don't need any further explanation, then click past anything tutorial/example-problem-related and proceed to the first actual question (because once you are through with the Master Tutorial at the very beginning of the DAT, your time for the SNS has started....so any mini-tutorials for each section are ticking down your clock...if you don't need a mini-tutorial, go to the first actual question).

    A couple of recommendations:
    1. Before you go to the test, have a good breakfast or lunch....protein, carbs, a little fat, etc. (No, I wouldn't recommend a Double Whopper with cheese or anything that is going to spike your blood sugars going into the test, and then turn you into a narcoleptic during the test). Ham and Eggs, Oatmeal with some Protein powder, Tuna sandwich....something to satisfy the body's need for fuel, but that's not going to put you on the Carbohydrate roller-coaster....stuffed/starving, stuffed/starving, awake/tired, awake/tired.
    2. Once you arrive at the testing center and have shown the first receptionist your I.D. and signed in, ask to use the restroom. Go to the restroom and hit the water fountain. You don't want to have to go to the bathroom or get dehydrated midway through either half of the test and have it distract you from the questions at hand.
    3. I brought some QR (Math) flashcards with me to review during the break. I'm 37 and haven't had Algebra, Trig or Geometry in almost 20 years, so I'm a little rusty on these subjects. Since the QR section is after the 15 minute break, I take this time to go to my locker, get my snack (protein bar, nuts or some other carb/protein-balanced food), review some Trig functions, go get a drink and go to the bathroom again, etc. Some people can't review right before the test like that, so if that freaks you out then don't do it. Just relax during your break. You don't have to even leave your computer if you don't want to. In fact, the break is optional, so you could end the break at any time you want and proceed right on to the RC section, but I think it is better to take the break and give your mind a little rest so that you're not going 4h 15m straight. Doing that tends to fatigue people just about the time they're asking you some Trig function. The computer counts down the time remaining for your break, so if you are wearing a watch, start the stopwatch as soon as your break starts so that you know when you are expected back at the computer. Take into account that when you go back to the computer after your break, you'll have to give the inner receptionist your I.D.'s again and sign in again, and that will take about a minute or so, so plan your break's timing accordingly.

    Okay. Let me find a decent TFE example and start doing the tutorial workup. As I said, I'll try and make it as elaborate and detailed as possible given my time constraints. I'm on the East Coast right now and don't know where you are, so check this thread before you go to bed, just in case I'm not able to post the tutorial until later tonight.

    Justin (2thDMD)
     
  35. 2thDMD

    2thDMD 10+ Year Member

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    Aug 15, 2007
    Sea of Ash,

    I have a couple of recommendations for angle rankings:
    1. I would recommend sitting back in your chair (not you AND the chair leaning back, but you with your back against the chair), and look at the angles from this somewhat more distant vantagepoint. Being too close to the computer screen trying to take in every little pixel can sometimes make all the angles too close (i.e.: similar) for differentiation. Looking at them from a little further away gives the brain a little better relational vantagepoint.
    2. Also, I tend to look at all four angles and find the smallest and the largest first, and then I look at them again to make sure that I'm not being too hasty in my assessment. Then, I look at the answer choices and see which have the smallest and the largest angles in the proper order, immediately negating some of the other answers. Sometimes there'll only be one answer choice with the smallest angle number first and the largest angle number last. If that is the case, then that's your answer. If there are two answer choices available with the correct smallest/largest angles in the right order, then I look at the two in-between angles and see which one of those two will fit into the other. Then I see which of the two remaining possible answers has that particular order.

    Hope this helps.

    Justin (2thDMD)
     
  36. 2thDMD

    2thDMD 10+ Year Member

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    Aug 15, 2007
    Polishp86,

    Still working on the TFE Tutorial.
    I'm going into an area that might not have WiFi, so if I can post it tonight, I will. Otherwise, I'll post it as early as possible tomorrow morning.

    Justin (2thDMD)
     
  37. 2thDMD

    2thDMD 10+ Year Member

    81
    7
    Aug 15, 2007
    Polishp86,

    Here are some more TFE tutorials for you.
    Obviously some of the incorrect answers in the following tutorials could be negated in several ways, not just the ways that I chose.
    However, not wanting to go through every possible negation or permutation and make this a really long tutorial set, I just based the tutorials on what first came to my mind's eye.
    Good luck on your test.

    Justin (2thDMD)

    NOTE: All of the original images I used as a basis for this post/tutorial were provided courtesy of © Crack the DAT 2009.

    At the bottom of this post/tutorial is a weblink that will take you to their website so you can see their portfolio of DAT-related study products.

    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]





    [​IMG]


    Crack the DAT software is available here: http://www.crackdat.com/
     
    Last edited: Jul 24, 2014
  38. 2thDMD

    2thDMD 10+ Year Member

    81
    7
    Aug 15, 2007
    If anyone still needs any explanation on any part of the PAT, I might be able to do a tutorial for you now that my DAT is finished.
    I'll try to accommodate as many requests as possible (given the fact that I have a wife, a full-time job and school starting up again soon).

    If anybody has a specific PAT problem that they have seen and are still confused about, scan/post it to the board and I'll take a look at it and see what kind of workup I can come up with.

    Justin (2thDMD)
     
  39. Dippi

    Dippi 5+ Year Member

    20
    0
    Jun 17, 2008
    Are there any sites where there are a list of practice questions free and readily available? :rolleyes:


    I am going to be taking the DAT in a matter of days, and ive exhausted my materials, and would like to look at some fresh material.

    Any body have any ideas?:oops:

    BTW, this thread ROCKS MY SOCKS
     
  40. 2thDMD

    2thDMD 10+ Year Member

    81
    7
    Aug 15, 2007
    If I'm not mistaken, the ADA still has a full-length DAT on it's website that you can download, print and use to test yourself. Obviously it isn't the same test you are going to get on test day. But, it is a real DAT they gave years ago and will give you an idea of what to expect when you take the real thing. Hope this helps.

    Justin (2thDMD)
     
  41. Dippi

    Dippi 5+ Year Member

    20
    0
    Jun 17, 2008
    yea, ive used that test already also. Did well, i guess. Studies the questions that i got wrong and also the ones i struggled with. Any other ideas?
     
  42. DocVT

    DocVT 2+ Year Member

    58
    0
    Sep 25, 2008
    How did you do on your DAT 2thDMD, if you don't mind me asking?
     
  43. 2thDMD

    2thDMD 10+ Year Member

    81
    7
    Aug 15, 2007
    If you had a little more than a couple days before your DAT I would recommend DAT Achiever, Top Score Pro and DAT Destroyer. Those are good prep materials.

    The other thing that I just thought of was FlashCardExchange:

    http://www.flashcardexchange.com/tag/dat

    Just remember, that these cards are created by other students and not some company that is trying to make a profit (and is therefore going to fact check everything before it puts it on the website). So, keep in mind that there might be the occasional error.

    Hope this helps,

    Justin (2thDMD)
     
    Last edited: Dec 23, 2008
  44. 2thDMD

    2thDMD 10+ Year Member

    81
    7
    Aug 15, 2007
    Better than last time, but not quite as well as I had hoped for this time.
    As I mentioned in an earlier post, I'm 37 years old, have a wife, full-time job and some school, so don't necessarily have 12-16 hours a day to study for the DAT, as I would have had if I were doing this back in my early twenties. Given my current situation, there are only so many hours in the day to study for the DAT and class(es). Obviously, when I get into dental school, my full-time job will cease and my current schooling will be replaced by dental school, so I'll be able to study the appropriate amount of hours to do well in dental school, so I'm not worried about any of that, nor trying to be too hard on myself for not crushing the DAT. A stellar DAT score would have been nice, but I know that I am more than the sum of my DAT scores.

    The two subjects that really drew down my overall score were Gen Chem and QR.
    I haven't had Gen Chem in about 5 years and haven't had Algebra, Trig or Geometry in almost 20 years. When it came to those sections on test day, my mind just wasn't bringing it's "A" game. It happens. We're only human, right? With regard to those two sections I'm sort of like a mosquito in a nudist colony....I know what to do, I sometimes just don't know where to start.

    I did pretty well in the two sections that I think are the most important to sound dentistry: Biology and the PAT (19 and 22, respectively). If you agree with this prior statement let me clarify one thing, it is in no way an endorsement for anybody to blow off the other sections and just focus on these two. Study all the sections of the DAT earnestly, because even if you don't get asked 98% of the information you've learned while studying for the DAT, part of the purpose of the DAT (and it's requisite studying) is to open your eyes to all of the incredible (and sometimes very intricate) biological/chemical processes in this great thing we call Life, and to make you a much more informed student, overall, when you do step through the doors of dental school.

    Good luck to everybody still prepping for the DAT.

    Once again, if anybody needs a specific PAT problem explained, or a tutorial on a certain section of the PAT, let me know.
    I think that I'm going to do one for Hole-Punching and maybe one for Pattern-Folding (if anybody is interested).

    Justin (2thDMD)
     
  45. Major Groove

    Major Groove 2+ Year Member

    85
    0
    Aug 29, 2008
    The one thing that got me was the stupid angles!!!

    I know that's supposed to be the mindless, easy one, but damnit!

    Stupid angles. There's really no surefire way to attack it, either.

    I used the marker and dry erase board, but inevitably two angles were within a billionth of a degree or something.


    ...my strategy? Get really good at everything else, that way I can throw away the angles and still do well.

    Seems to have worked out: PAT 22.
     
  46. dentrilla

    dentrilla 2+ Year Member

    169
    0
    Aug 15, 2008
    Hey, first off this thread is a great tool that I've found very helpful. I think I've mastered all the PAT sections now except for pattern folding; it would be great if you posted some of your amazing solutions to some of the harder problems! Thanks a bunch! Your work does not go unappreciated :):)
     
  47. urDDS

    urDDS 2+ Year Member

    143
    0
    Jul 24, 2008
    you promised me you are going to do a tutrorial for folding please do it i really really suck at that section.

    thanks alot
     
  48. 2thDMD

    2thDMD 10+ Year Member

    81
    7
    Aug 15, 2007
    I should have something by the Friday-ish, work-schedule permitting.

    Justin (2thDMD)
     
  49. bbqbot

    bbqbot starting late 2+ Year Member

    15
    0
    Aug 5, 2008
    NoVA
    I would just like to thank 2th and Sama for all their hard work and clear-cut answers. I won't be taking the DAT for over a year (still have several pre-reqs to take, like bio and orgo, though I finished undergrad in '07), but am finding this material very helpful.

    Being a mech. engineer, the PAT stuff isn't obscenely difficult for me, but after seeing the mastery 2th has in his explanations and then seeing that he (only?) got a 22, I think the sooner I start practicing, the better.

    Thanks again; my killer is going to be the angle problems.
     
  50. 2thDMD

    2thDMD 10+ Year Member

    81
    7
    Aug 15, 2007
    I've received numerous requests to do some Hole-Punching and Pattern-Folding tutorials. I just finished approximately 6-7 Hole-Punching tutorials and will post them later tonight (If I take the time to upload them now, I'll be late for work).

    I'll see if I can put together the Pattern-Folding tutorials either tomorrow or Monday.

    Best regards,

    Justin (2thDMD)
     
    Last edited: Jan 3, 2009
  51. 2thDMD

    2thDMD 10+ Year Member

    81
    7
    Aug 15, 2007
    Here are some of the Hole-Punching tutorials I promised some of the students who contacted me.

    Since SDN has a limit as to how many pictures you can upload per post, I'm going to span the tutorials across several posts.

    Justin (2thDMD)

    P.S. The first picture is a kind of "Guidelines" or "Rules" summary that will help the actual tutorials that follow make sense.

    NOTE: All of the original images I used as a basis for this post/tutorial were provided courtesy of © Crack the DAT 2009.

    At the bottom of this post/tutorial is a weblink that will take you to their website so you can see their portfolio of DAT-related study products.


    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    Crack the DAT software is available here: http://www.crackdat.com/
     
    Last edited: Jul 12, 2014

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