Need Your Advice!!

Discussion in 'Medical Students - DO' started by IUHoosier, Feb 13, 1999.

  1. IUHoosier

    IUHoosier Member
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    I was wondering if any of you already in medical school or completed it, could advise me on how best to prepare for it. I have now till the time school starts off, and I am a little worried I will be out of sink for studying. I was wondering what you thought the toughest class was which book you had. I thought it would be good for me to but a used text book and study it off and on till school starts. I know you will probably say just enjoy yourself, which I plan to do as well, but I have a lot of time right now and I would love to try and get a good start. Any advice would be great. (Prefontaine, please no negative advice.... I've had enough of that from your other posts) HE HE!
     
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  3. Deb

    Deb Senior Member
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    If you feel you must study something, study the subject you've had the
    least exposure to. For example, I had never taken a course in human
    anatomy, and so for me, gross anatomy was the toughest 1st year course.
    I know of others who had not had much physio or biochem, so for them,
    physio or biochem was their toughest course. But please, don't spend
    alot of time studying. This is your last year of real freedom and if
    you don't enjoy it to the fullest, I promise you'll regret it.
     
  4. Henry

    Henry Senior Member
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    When I reaed your email, I really want to tell you, drop the books and enjoy. Travel and have adventure, because you won't have the time to do those things in the coming 7 years.

    However, you can still buy used books to save up money. For anatomy, buy Netter. It is the best. Don't buy any fancy CD rom anatomy program. Nothing look as real as the real body that your professor will make the tags on in your test.


     
  5. Gregory Gulick

    Gregory Gulick Senior Member
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    So, Deb, I've not had Anatomy, Physio, Micro or Biochem. I will be having a heck of a time, eh?

    [​IMG]

     
  6. DO 2 be

    DO 2 be Member
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    I am first year so my exposure is limited. Gross anatomy was hard for me because of the depth at which the material was covered. I've had Introductory Human Anatomy before but it was no where near this class. You practically had to know the body inside out, almost every single nerve, muscle and vessel and bone. The Netter Atlas is the Bible. I haven't had Biochem beyond glycolysis and TCA cycle so I find Biochem to be challenging as well. I haven't had Histology Lab either and that wasn't easy. So it all depends on what classes you have taken before. But don't worry too much. If you want to study now, take an Anatomy class or Histology or Physiology. Even my Biochem major classmate did not see half the material before. Again here, you've gotta know every pathway there is, including enzymes and regulations.

    I worked until June then took two months off to travel. I don't regret it and suggest you do the same. You will regret that time the moment you start school. It's pretty much "Your life on the shelf for 7 years".

    One of my classmate asked a professor, "Where is my life?". Answer: "You put your life behind when you decided to go to med school". Every doc who lectured the first quarter always talked about how their lives were "on-hold" for seven years. Now, the classes are getting interesting and it's actually fun studying the material so it's not as bad as the first quarter. Not to say that the stuff the first quarter wasn't fun but it's just too much you feel overwhelmed. In class practically from 8-5 every day. The hardest part about adjusting is NO weekend. ;-(

    Enjoy your time off now that you have it and ... enjoy med school when the time comes. ;-)
     
  7. Deb

    Deb Senior Member
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    Gregory

    Please don't worry, I'm sure you'll do fine. Unfortunately, DO 2 be is correct in
    his description of the levels of difficulty you'll encounter. However, no matter
    how thorough your background, med school is tough. Having had alot of upper level
    courses only makes the process slightly less painful. As I have stated before, the
    key is effective time management, especially for the first year, as you will quickly
    feel overwhelmed if you haven't effectively used your time. This is one thing I want
    to be especially clear in explaining. Starting the FIRST DAY of class you should
    study EVERY DAY. This means reading the information covered that day and prereading
    the material for the next day. I DON'T mean mastering the material, just quickly
    reading it. This is a good way to start, because you really don't yet know your
    abilities and you have no idea what to expect for the first test block. This kind
    of strategy will ensure a good performance, and relieve alot of the anxiety. I
    have said before that studying too much is a mistake, and that is true, EXCEPT for
    the first test block. It's a very difficult time, in many different ways...embarking
    on the toughest experience of your life, being in a strange city, surrounded by strange
    people, etc. Once you get past that point things will get better and you can relax
    your study schedule. Also, as time goes by, you become much better at juggling all the
    material. I hope I haven't scared anyone too much, because that was not my intent.
    Just get off to a good start and you'll be fine. Sorry to be sooooo long winded.
     
  8. IUHoosier

    IUHoosier Member
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    Thank you all for the replies. I will take your advice to heart. I was already planning on a trip to Europe. Now I will worry about planning that instead. I was just concerned that I would get out of the groove, and almost forget what it was that got me into medical school in the first place. I had had to change my ways previously to improve my grades, so I was just concerned I would become my lazy self. I think I will do a lot of lesure reading now with books I've always wanted to read. Your replies have been great.

    Josh

    P.S. GO PACERS!!
     
  9. dcdo

    dcdo Senior Member
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    To those concerned about 1st year,

    I think Deb has pretty much hit the nail on the head. Start by "overstudying" up to the first set of exams, and then you will settle down into the pace that works for you. Not just enough to do OK on the tests, but enough to really learn it. But make sure you keep the new pace and don't let up!(It's easy to start slacking off in the second semester)
     

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