studentdocftw

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Long story short, I was not able to perform research during undergrad. Anyone else out there (crickets) who also did no research having any luck? Obviously it's early, but I thought it would be interesting to see if otherwise competitive applicants weren't getting looked at due to no research (obviously outside top 20).
 
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studentdocftw

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But would that be more of a result that highly qualified applicants (GPA, MCAT, ect) usually have a research background? Or that research is heavily sought?
 

NotASerialKiller

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Both. Research is nice, but not required. Therefore a lot of people might seek it out specifically to look good for med school and skew the stats, but at the end of the day what matters for someone like you is how many actually get in with none. The MSAR will tell you that. You could get some anecdotes from people here, but especially this early in the cycle you wouldn't be able to conclude much from it. With decent stats there's no reason to panic just because you don't have research experience, especially if you applied to schools that aren't research-heavy.
 
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Lucca

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It is very difficult for me to tell given the broad range of undergrad involvement in research (I washed things once a week vs. I work 20+ hours a week on something I think is awesome and know a lot about...and everything in between) how much of the "I had research in undergrad" crowd on MSAR were just students completing a self-fulfilling prophecy (research gets you into medical school and therefore I did research) while doing everything else well enough to get away with 0 research if they truly wanted to. My intuition is that the percentage of people who received a leg up precisely because of their research background is actually very small. At most I believe adcoms value understanding how to engage with primary literature and the scientific method rather than man hours spent looking into the microscope. Barring MD/PhD committees, of course.

Just excel in every other category and you should be ok. Scholarship is important but research, the scholarship of discovery, is only one kind.
 
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studentdocftw

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It is very difficult for me to tell given the broad range of undergrad involvement in research (I washed things once a week vs. I work 20+ hours a week on something I think is awesome and know a lot about and everything in between) how much of the "I had research in undergrad" crowd on MSAR were just students completing a self-fulfilling prophecy (research gets you into medical school and therefore I did research) while doing everything else well enough to get away with 0 research. My intuition is that the percentage of people who received a leg up precisely because of their research background is actually very small. At most I believe adcoms value understanding how to engage with primary literature and the scientific method rather than man hours spent looking into the microscope. Barring MD/PhD committees, of course.

Just excel in every other category and you should be ok. Scholarship is important but research, the scholarship of discovery, is only one kind.
That's a bit encouraging...seeing as the majority of schools seem to have 90%+ matriculants with research.
 

nwts

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I have no research experience, and I have 6 IIs.
 

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It is very difficult for me to tell given the broad range of undergrad involvement in research (I washed things once a week vs. I work 20+ hours a week on something I think is awesome and know a lot about and everything in between) how much of the "I had research in undergrad" crowd on MSAR were just students completing a self-fulfilling prophecy (research gets you into medical school and therefore I did research) while doing everything else well enough to get away with 0 research. My intuition is that the percentage of people who received a leg up precisely because of their research background is actually very small. At most I believe adcoms value understanding how to engage with primary literature and the scientific method rather than man hours spent looking into the microscope. Barring MD/PhD committees, of course.

Just excel in every other category and you should be ok. Scholarship is important but research, the scholarship of discovery, is only one kind.
Exactly. The research statistics are terribly exaggerated because many applicants miscategorize lab maintenance as research. Independent, productive research work is difficult to come across, and it is something seen from applicants applying to research-heavy medical schools and MSTPs.
 

Lucca

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That's a bit encouraging...seeing as the majority of schools seem to have 90%+ matriculants with research.
Yah that seems to be the case but I'm just really skeptical. The amount of undergrads doing meaningful stuff is really small compared to the total amount of undergrads and even then I would say a smaller fraction of those are pre-meds.
 
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studentdocftw

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awesome, thanks for the responses guys!
 

Maruko

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now looking back, i realize that research isn't that important, unless you publish papers in journals.
just get good GPA, good MCAT and ECs.