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Nontrad + Reapplicant

Catherine81

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The last time I took the MCAT four years ago, I decided to call it quits and explore other careers. I was extremely discouraged in the past and thought that medicine was not for me. I am finishing a master's degree in a business field (due in March) and working at one of the largest public accounting firms in the country. However, the desire of becoming a doctor has never waned over time. Now, I am not sure how and where to begin my second attempt in pursuing a career as a physician. I graduated with a bachelor's degree in biology and so I have already completed all the requisite courses for medical school. My MCAT scores are too old and of course, not too stellar.

I would like to ask anyone's opinion. Should I take the MCAT and apply using outdated transcripts, LORs, etc? Should I do a post-bac or a master's? I know that an MBA is worthless since none of the courses are in science. I am not sure where to begin at all. I need assistance in this matter!

Catherine
 

relentless11

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I would like to ask anyone's opinion. Should I take the MCAT and apply using outdated transcripts, LORs, etc? Should I do a post-bac or a master's? I know that an MBA is worthless since none of the courses are in science. I am not sure where to begin at all. I need assistance in this matter!

Catherine

You will need new "everything", with a lesser extent in terms of classes. The MCAT is a must since most schools want MCAT scores within the last 2-3 years. New letters of recs are a must since they want to know what people are "currently" thinking of you. This can be from the same person(s), but its probably good to get letters that were written recently.

Its fair game for med schools to figure out that you're using the same LORs. Shows that you didn't put in the time to get new ones, or worse, didn't do anything in the past 4 years to earn new LORs. If not for these reasons, then at least get new ones because I'm sure a lot of things have happened to make you a unique applicant during the past few years.

Your call, and it also depends on your undergrad GPA. If it is low, then I would suggest doing post-bacc or an SMP. Boosting GPA is a good thing. If your GPA is fine, then I would still go back to school to get back into the swing of things. Taking 3 months of from school can blunt your academic edge...let alone a year or two off. A masters program is OK too, but as you may already know, grad classes do not boost undergrad GPA. Its not really about taking science classes now, especially if you came out of your bachelors program with a good GPA.

I've known people who had a 3.6-3.7 after getting their BS in biological sciences, but then wanted to do something non-science so did an MBA, or MA...and in one case went to law school. They were competative for med school given they had a good MCAT score too. If you did well in school, then med schools don't really care what classes you take aslong as you took the pre-reqs and did well on the MCAT.
 

Byronsgoat

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Should I take the MCAT and apply using outdated transcripts, LORs, etc? Should I do a post-bac or a master's? I know that an MBA is worthless since none of the courses are in science.

I agree with Relentless - new LOR's are a must. Additionally, if your undergrad courses (e.g. physics, orgo) were less than stellar (I'd say less than B) you should take them again; you must prove to an admission's committee that you have the wherewithal to handle the load in med school. But your MCAT is the key; a solid MCAT covers up deficiencies in most other places.

Perhaps your old professors/LOR writers will remember you and update their letters?

Very important - your MBA is not worthless. While the actual practice of medicine is still largely about "good" medicine, the management of that practice is all about business (sometimes/often the two are in conflict). Business skills are widely desired; don't sell the MBA short.
 
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foofish

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Very important - your MBA is not worthless. While the actual practice of medicine is still largely about "good" medicine, the management of that practice is all about business (sometimes/often the two are in conflict). Business skills are widely desired; don't sell the MBA short.

I agree. :thumbup: I've also heard that physicians with MBAs often find it much easier--or at least less stressful--to set up a private practice since it's in essence setting up and running your own business. One of the most common complaints of doctors going into private practice is that med school failed to prepare them for the business aspect of the profession. Good luck!
 

PB2464

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I too have a bachelor's degree in biology and have applied to several business schools for Fall 2007. After visiting one school and interviewing, I realized that B-school is just not for me. My life-long dream was to go to med school. A couple poor grades in O-chem caused me to lose focus. An MBA was going to be the key to a good job and only two years of school.
I think if I choose the MBA then I will have life-long regrets.
 
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