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Not Good Freshman Year: No Chance at MD?

Sep 9, 2019
80
111
41
  1. Pre-Medical
You are fine! I got 2 B+ and 2 B’s in my freshman year of college for science pre reqs (I took 4). I buckled down and got a 4.0 every semester after that. I also didn’t do EMT because I had limited time and other ECs appealed to me more. GPA came out 3.8+ with 3.7 science. Average MCAT. Even if I had gotten a few A- or something along the way would have been fine too. Got accepted to multiple MD’s!
 
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DarklingThrush

Full Member
2+ Year Member
Oct 27, 2016
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  1. Medical Student
Hello, this is my first time using this website so I'm not familiar with all of the policies (please bear with me).

Currently, I am a BME who is on track for premed. My freshman semester went pretty poorly, which was completely my fault as I didn't put as much effort as I should have into it. My current semester breakdown is 3.3/3.5. My overall GPA is a 3.4 as a result.

Additionally, many of the courses that I didn't do great in were premed requirements (along with some calculus grades). I have a B's for the Gen Chems, A- for Physics I, and B's for Calc II/III.

The realization that I had such low grades for freshman year really just started hitting me hard now and I've been especially stressed out by this. Does anyone have any experience with situations like this, where a great upward trend is going to be difficult to show in two/three years? With Covid happening in the background, I was unable to pursue opportunities like EMT training which might have helped to offset this poor start which is causing even more concern. I know that I'd need to buckle down for the next two/three years to try to even get close to a 3.6 GPA (still not very competitive). After the damage I've done, is there really a chance for becoming an MD (assuming that I won't get a 520+ on MCAT).

Any general advice/study tips would be greatly appreciated. Thank you.
For my prerequisites, I got B’s in chem, Ochem and biochem I got an A in all the other prerequisites. My cGPA was a 3.4x brought up from a 3.2x with 60+ credits of a 3.7x postbacc. You still have time but don’t mess around. Work hard and get A’s. Find some solid and unique EC’s. I have very solid EC’s (think NCAA athletics). I did not have even close to a 520 and was admitted MD.

I don’t have study advice. Just buckle down and do your best. Use tutoring resources if you need help. You have plenty of time to improve in the next 3 years.
 
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Rachapkis

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Apr 5, 2018
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First, a 3.4 GPA for your first year is not that bad. Second, you have a lot of time to increase your GPA. Third, you GPA often rises as you move into higher-level classes in your major. You need to determine whether you will enjoy the road to becoming a doctor, but, if the answer is "yes", you are still very much in the hunt.
 
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chaim123

Almost an MD
Volunteer Staff
2+ Year Member
Dec 24, 2016
971
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  1. Medical Student
Hello, this is my first time using this website so I'm not familiar with all of the policies (please bear with me).

Currently, I am a BME who is on track for premed. My freshman semester went pretty poorly, which was completely my fault as I didn't put as much effort as I should have into it. My current semester breakdown is 3.3/3.5. My overall GPA is a 3.4 as a result.

Additionally, many of the courses that I didn't do great in were premed requirements (along with some calculus grades). I have a B/B+ for the Gen Chems, A- for Physics I, and B's for Calc II/III.

The realization that I had such low grades for freshman year really just started hitting me hard now and I've been especially stressed out by this. Does anyone have any experience with situations like this, where a great upward trend is going to be difficult to show in two/three years? I didn't really look for EC's my first semester and with COVID happening in the background, I was unable to pursue opportunities like EMT training which might have helped to offset this poor start which is causing even more concern. I know that I'd need to buckle down for the next two/three years to try to even get close to a 3.6 GPA (still not very competitive). After the damage I've done, is there really a chance for becoming an MD (assuming that I won't get a 520+ on MCAT).

I really do like engineering (at least what I've experienced so far), but I feel as though premed is the only real option where I can support myself. Does anyone have any advice or tips that I could use to improve studying habits and motivation? I'm taking Org Chem and Physics II next semester so I need help ASAP.

Extra: Does crediting the Calc III class look bad to adcoms? It would raise my GPA by 0.05 points which I'm not sure it's worth doing.

Thank you for any help.

Big deep breaths. Those grades aren't perfect, but they are acceptable, and you are only a freshman. Three years of strong work is more than enough to overcome those grades. I'm not sure why you think you're capped at a 3.6 - I think you'll be able to get far above that. Take stock of where you are, and what you need to do to succeed in the future.

Also just two cents but think about where your passions lie. I always tell people to do something they love, but unfortunately things like BME and CS tend to have harsh curves that can be hurtful in the medical school application process.
 
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worriedbmepremed913

New Member
May 21, 2020
3
0
1
  1. Pre-Health (Field Undecided)
Thank you for all of your speedy responses!

The major problem I have is that I personally know multiple individuals within the same institution taking the same programs as I am doing a lot better than I am (while having a lot more responsibilities). It is when I see these situations where I feel utterly hopeless. I've been searching for opportunities to up my volunteering in the meantime to help me catch up, but I feel as though everything I'm trying to do is going to be done by premeds everywhere and won't stand up to scrutiny.

I'm inspired by the stories above, however, as premed expectations become higher and higher every year, I'm not getting less and less sure of myself. The lack of commitment to premed seems to have bitten me back. I am still hopeful that I could make a good GPA, but with the course load I've taken on I will definitely have to do some soul searching as suggested.
 
D

deleted1005514

Thank you for all of your speedy responses!

The major problem I have is that I personally know multiple individuals within the same institution taking the same programs as I am doing a lot better than I am (while having a lot more responsibilities). It is when I see these situations where I feel utterly hopeless. I've been searching for opportunities to up my volunteering in the meantime to help me catch up, but I feel as though everything I'm trying to do is going to be done by premeds everywhere and won't stand up to scrutiny.

I'm inspired by the stories above, however, as premed expectations become higher and higher every year, I'm not getting less and less sure of myself. The lack of commitment to premed seems to have bitten me back.

Stop comparing yourself to other people...you are in a competition with yourself for a medical school seat. Also, some people come into college with better time management or study skills, and some don't. Find your weaknesses and work on them, so you will improve and can take on more ECs. You still have 3 years to build a great app. Honestly, a 5 hour a week commitment over a period of a year will net you 200+ hours in a volunteering opportunity...you don't have to do a ton of something for it to add up over time.
 
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itsme87123

Full Member
May 19, 2020
15
10
36
  1. Pre-Medical
You are fine! I got 2 B+ and 2 B’s in my freshman year of college for science pre reqs (I took 4). I buckled down and got a 4.0 every semester after that. I also didn’t do EMT because I had limited time and other ECs appealed to me more. GPA came out 3.8+ with 3.7 science. Average MCAT. Even if I had gotten a few A- or something along the way would have been fine too. Got accepted to multiple MD’s!

Wow congrats on the multiple MD acceptances!
 
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Jun 11, 2010
67,017
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Somewhere west of St. Louis
  1. Non-Student
Hello, this is my first time using this website so I'm not familiar with all of the policies (please bear with me).

Currently, I am a BME who is on track for premed. My freshman semester went pretty poorly, which was completely my fault as I didn't put as much effort as I should have into it. My current semester breakdown is 3.3/3.5. My overall GPA is a 3.4 as a result.

Additionally, many of the courses that I didn't do great in were premed requirements (along with some calculus grades). I have a B/B+ for the Gen Chems, A- for Physics I, and B's for Calc II/III.

The realization that I had such low grades for freshman year really just started hitting me hard now and I've been especially stressed out by this. Does anyone have any experience with situations like this, where a great upward trend is going to be difficult to show in two/three years? I didn't really look for EC's my first semester and with COVID happening in the background, I was unable to pursue opportunities like EMT training which might have helped to offset this poor start which is causing even more concern. I know that I'd need to buckle down for the next two/three years to try to even get close to a 3.6 GPA (still not very competitive). After the damage I've done, is there really a chance for becoming an MD (assuming that I won't get a 520+ on MCAT).

I really do like engineering (at least what I've experienced so far), but I feel as though premed is the only real option where I can support myself. Does anyone have any advice or tips that I could use to improve studying habits and motivation? I'm taking Org Chem and Physics II next semester so I need help ASAP.

Extra: Does crediting the Calc III class look bad to adcoms? It would raise my GPA by 0.05 points which I'm not sure it's worth doing.

Thank you for any help.
This is very common and now that you know what to do (or rather, what NOT to do), start doing well. Rising GPA trends are always goo.d
 
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worriedbmepremed913

New Member
May 21, 2020
3
0
1
  1. Pre-Health (Field Undecided)
Thank you for all of your help everyone! I'm definitely a lot more motivated now to improve my habits and hopefully the results will show themselves. I'm still debating about pass/failing my low calc grade. Since it's outside the prerequisites for med school, would it be alright to do so? Would it look strange, especially during these times? It would change my grade by around 0.05 points but I'm not sure if it is worth it.
 
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