Aug 25, 2020
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Hi everyone. This is my first post.

I received my BSN (Bachelors in nursing) in 2011 and since then have worked in long term and subacute care, inpatient geri psych, home care, med-surg oncology, and most recently clinical research. I have worked as a clinical research nurse since March 2019 and I am enjoying it much more than my other nursing jobs. Back when I was working med surg, I started my degree to become a nurse practitioner, but I don't think I want or enjoy the clinical aspect of nursing. I think getting my NP would add more stress and responsibility, which is not what I'm looking for. I want to advance my degree, and I really enjoy research. I do not miss patient interaction and enjoy dealing with data, organizing, making graphs, updating protocols and consents. Do you think an MPH would be a good route for me to take? What concentration would be most in line with my experience? Biostatistics? Only one school in my area offers the MPH and they do not offer biostatistics, so I was thinking I would do it online. Please let me know your thoughts and opinions.

Thank you!
 
Sep 15, 2019
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  1. Medical Student
If you're interested in research and analyzing data I'd recommend a Masters in Epidemiology over an MPH. It's much more focused for clinical research- the MPH is more broad. It would set you up well for research where as an MPH prepares you for many different positions- research, program management, public health policy, etc. I know most clinical research positions prefer Epi graduates over MPH grads since it's much more research focused.

I'd be wary of an MPH program that doesn't offer biostats. If that's your only in person option I'd recommend doing an online program.
 
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She-Hulk

5+ Year Member
Feb 25, 2015
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If you're interested in research and analyzing data I'd recommend a Masters in Epidemiology over an MPH. It's much more focused for clinical research- the MPH is more broad. It would set you up well for research where as an MPH prepares you for many different positions- research, program management, public health policy, etc. I know most clinical research positions prefer Epi graduates over MPH grads since it's much more research focused.

I'd be wary of an MPH program that doesn't offer biostats. If that's your only in person option I'd recommend doing an online program.

Agree. It would be unusual for an MPH program not to offer biostats, most of the marketable skills from the MPH come from a few specific hard skill fields like Epi and Biostats. Definitely if you already know what you want to do, and you like research, then get an MS in Epidemiology and do a lot of research related work. Yale is supposed to be good for research, as well as schools that are known in public health for their research like JHU, Tulane, Emory, Michigan . . . there are a lot of schools that use the MPH as a money maker as it is a generalist degree for people who don't know what they want to do in life, but want a masters degree that offers flexibility for applying for jobs that it helps to have a masters degree in any field.

Though you don't want patient interaction, there are places that need a person with a clinical degree in order to do research studies, you could combine that with a highly specific, but highly marketable degree in epi that gives you practice experience running clinical trials.
 

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