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zkflash_dpt

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Hey guys! I'm getting ready to apply to schools this summer and the NSU Tampa hybrid program seems very interesting to me and is one of my top choices. I was just wondering how those who are attending this program or have attended this program feel about it, and whether or not you feel having half of the curriculum online puts you at a disadvantage at all. Thanks!
 

Lasombra

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Hi, I'm finishing up my third year in this program. I haven't experienced anything else, so it's hard to really put it in context, but it was the right choice for me. A few thoughts
  • I feel that the flipped/hybrid format is a strength, at least for my own learning style. To me, a lecture is a lecture whether it's coming from my computer or a talking head at the front of the class. Getting all that done before meeting in person allows for very efficient use of time.
  • Hands-on practice at home is very hard to fit in, but also extremely important. Lab will go better if you at least have the gist of stuff. They do provide quite a few assignments with feedback (you will make a lot of videos).
  • You absolutely need to be both an independent learner and very self-motivated. It's a lot to keep on top of, and you can feel like you're on an island at times between institutes.
  • There is sometimes a very short turnaround between being taught something and the practical.
  • You can work. I know there are a few other hybrid programs out there, but the once-a-month institutes work well for me. I would not be on my way to being a PT without this format (I'm old, have a family, etc etc). So now they know who I am. (Hi Dr. B!) Actually, maybe not -- there are something like 12-15 kids between us all. So a family life is possible (though definitely more than a little crazy)
  • They incorporate work with patients early and often into your classes. You probably already know that they save all the clinicals for the very end (again, you can work!). I don't go out until August, but I do feel that they've prepared me well to hit the ground running (but I guess ask me in September!)
  • I feel like the institutes are well-run for the most part. I think you'll find logistical annoyances wherever you go, but I always learn and solidify an absolute ton. That said, they're very intense. You'll find out quickly that you absolutely need to be prepared to get the most out of them.
  • They practice what they preach in terms of iteration and reflection. They're good, and they want to be better. For example, their first several class had first-time pass rates in the high 90s. The group that took the NPTE this past July had a pretty dramatic drop, I want to say to about 75%. That's VERY concerning to me, but I was encouraged by how our director handled it. She was open and proactive about what happened, and what they thought the issues were. She was also clear about what they plan to do about it. I'm a worrier, but I won't be worried about this (unless this year's class has the same issue) because of how she handled it.
Hope that's helpful. It's a great program with great people, but again, I haven't experienced anything else. I'm coming out a little ahead in terms of cost versus my state school even with 37 round-trip flights/hotels/etc because of the format.

Oh, they have a podcast! I think they call it Shaken and Stirred. Just a few episodes, but they talk a bit about how they set it up and why. Dr. Blackinton also has gone on the Healthcare Education Transformation podcast, maybe some others too.
 
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zkflash_dpt

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Hi, I'm finishing up my third year in this program. I haven't experienced anything else, so it's hard to really put it in context, but it was the right choice for me. A few thoughts
  • I feel that the flipped/hybrid format is a strength, at least for my own learning style. To me, a lecture is a lecture whether it's coming from my computer or a talking head at the front of the class. Getting all that done before meeting in person allows for very efficient use of time.
  • Hands-on practice at home is very hard to fit in, but also extremely important. Lab will go better if you at least have the gist of stuff. They do provide quite a few assignments with feedback (you will make a lot of videos).
  • You absolutely need to be both an independent learner and very self-motivated. It's a lot to keep on top of, and you can feel like you're on an island at times between institutes.
  • There is sometimes a very short turnaround between being taught something and the practical.
  • You can work. I know there are a few other hybrid programs out there, but the once-a-month institutes work well for me. I would not be on my way to being a PT without this format (I'm old, have a family, etc etc). So now they know who I am. (Hi Dr. B!) Actually, maybe not -- there are something like 12-15 kids between us all. So a family life is possible (though definitely more than a little crazy)
  • They incorporate work with patients early and often into your classes. You probably already know that they save all the clinicals for the very end (again, you can work!). I don't go out until August, but I do feel that they've prepared me well to hit the ground running (but I guess ask me in September!)
  • I feel like the institutes are well-run for the most part. I think you'll find logistical annoyances wherever you go, but I always learn and solidify an absolute ton. That said, they're very intense. You'll find out quickly that you absolutely need to be prepared to get the most out of them.
  • They practice what they preach in terms of iteration and reflection. They're good, and they want to be better. For example, their first several class had first-time pass rates in the high 90s. The group that took the NPTE this past July had a pretty dramatic drop, I want to say to about 75%. That's VERY concerning to me, but I was encouraged by how our director handled it. She was open and proactive about what happened, and what they thought the issues were. She was also clear about what they plan to do about it. I'm a worrier, but I won't be worried about this (unless this year's class has the same issue) because of how she handled it.
Hope that's helpful. It's a great program with great people, but again, I haven't experienced anything else. I'm coming out a little ahead in terms of cost versus my state school even with 37 round-trip flights/hotels/etc because of the format.

Oh, they have a podcast! I think they call it Shaken and Stirred. Just a few episodes, but they talk a bit about how they set it up and why. Dr. Blackinton also has gone on the Healthcare Education Transformation podcast, maybe some others too.

Thank you so much for your response! Do you feel as though having all of the institutes at once helps you more as compared to if they were spread out? I feel like it may help you remember it better by doing them all at once.
 
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