Quantcast

NYC MCAT Prep: Think MCAt vs Kaplan Advice?

Get Shadowing and a Virtual Clinical Education
This forum made possible through the generous support of SDN members, donors, and sponsors. Thank you.

Medmegs

New Member
Joined
May 12, 2010
Messages
9
Reaction score
0
Hey,

Anyone in NYC take both (unlikely I know) or do enough research comparing Kaplan and Think MCAT? I am having a hard time deciding. I need the external structure of a course to keep my pace going - of that I am sure since I will be working full time. Or, anyone have any major pros-cons of either. I know that most of my work will be what I do on my own, but I would like to hear a case for either course.

Thanks!
 

JRTennis19

Full Member
Joined
Jan 11, 2012
Messages
18
Reaction score
0
I've taken both. They are VERY different approaches to the MCAT. For me, a blend of the two is what worked. Roberts is great at the Bio section and his audio is for the most part pretty good --- especially the bio audio. Kaplan is more geared towards test taking strategies and focuses less on content. If you're looking for a more detailed response, PM me.
 

pencap

Full Member
5+ Year Member
Joined
May 21, 2011
Messages
75
Reaction score
0
Hey I really would appreciate an answer on this. Looking for a prep class in the NYC area and was wondering what is the best out. Was looking into Thinkmcat. Any suggestions?
 

wehttamrrek

Full Member
Joined
Aug 26, 2012
Messages
32
Reaction score
2
Took the Kaplan prep course, definitely was a good resource. Some good review stuff but I didn't really find their techniques worked well for me. The amount of online quizzes for each subject and all of the other online practice tests did help with time management though. Glad I took it. Haven't taken the other prep course but thought I would give you my experience with Kaplan. Good luck!
 

Jepstein30

Full Member
Joined
Jun 29, 2011
Messages
1,721
Reaction score
293
Thanks, so you recommend Kaplan. Does anyone else have any opinions on prep courses?

I personally never took a prep course so take my opinion with a grain of salt. However, the general trend I see with Kaplan prep courses for any standardized test is more of a focus on test taking strategies rather than the actual content. This could be great for you (if you are bad at standardized tests but have a good grasp of the content) or terrible for you (if you really need heavy content review/struggled in some of the pre-reqs).

Self-studying also has its benefits in that you could tailor your own 'course' for your needs. If you aren't generally a good self-learner, maybe look into a tutor for specific subjects you are weak in.
 

Mehd School

Full Member
7+ Year Member
  • Joined
    May 2, 2012
    Messages
    2,369
    Reaction score
    823
    I personally never took a prep course so take my opinion with a grain of salt. However, the general trend I see with Kaplan prep courses for any standardized test is more of a focus on test taking strategies rather than the actual content. This could be great for you (if you are bad at standardized tests but have a good grasp of the content) or terrible for you (if you really need heavy content review/struggled in some of the pre-reqs).

    Self-studying also has its benefits in that you could tailor your own 'course' for your needs. If you aren't generally a good self-learner, maybe look into a tutor for specific subjects you are weak in.

    How would you notice Kaplan's "general trend" if you've never taken their course?
     

    Jepstein30

    Full Member
    Joined
    Jun 29, 2011
    Messages
    1,721
    Reaction score
    293
    How would you notice Kaplan's "general trend" if you've never taken their course?

    Experiences from countless friends who took their courses for the SAT/LSAT/MCAT.
    Reviewed their course materials myself when studying for the SAT/MCAT.
    Online reviews, posts here.
    Research when looking into working for one of these companies for MCAT prep.

    I'd say the same thing about Princeton Review. They are definitely very useful if they match your needs and study style but I've found the focus is on maximizing your performance via test-taking strategies rather than increasing your knowledge base. For example, Princeton Review commonly tells students taking the SAT to not even attempt to answer the last few math questions of each question because they are too hard and time is better spent reviewing the earlier problems. Very smart strategy if you are struggling with the section but not one you'd want to use if you're aiming for top scores.

    Again, this is just what I've noticed. Would I personally take a review course? Nope, but mostly because I learn pretty decently from self-study and would rather spend the money elsewhere.
     
    Top