Oak Hill Anesthesia Residency

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ucladoc2b

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Looks like the HCA residency at Oak Hill lost its accreditation effective 6/2024.

Oddly, this is the third USF affiliated anesthesia residency to close (TGH, Largo, Oak Hill).

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I heard USF/TGH was coming back. I think Largo & Oak Hill had no business being programs in the first place, like most/all of the HCA programs.
 
They all forgot that residents are there to learn and not just cheap labor.
 
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They all forgot that residents are there to learn and not just cheap labor.

The residents may be there to learn…. The problem is the attending docs and the system are not there to teach.
 
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On the ACGME website the HCA Florida Healthcare/USF Morsani College of
Medicine GME Oak Hill Hospital Anesthesiology Residency program is currently listed as accreditation withdrawn effective 6/30/2024
Anyone know what happened?
 
HCA.. the HMO of GME. I wouldn’t hire an hca trained janitor much less a physician.
 
We have a Kaiser trained surgeon who is good.

Funny how that works. We have an ivory tower trained MD/PhD who somehow still manages to find the most difficult lap chole they’ve ever encountered every damn time they insufflate the abdomen.
 
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The information is correct regarding the hca residency. That’s all I will say. Direct source I got.
 
So what happens to their residents now?


Most likely will be rehomed to other programs. That’s what happened when other programs and entire hospitals have closed. ACGME will actually watch out for those residents. Residents are like 10 month old huskies :)
 
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The other problem is these programs tend to match bottom of the barrel applicants that likely wouldn’t have matched anywhere else.

When I was in training we picked up 2 residents from 2 different closed programs and they were just about the worst residents I have ever seen. They’re out in practice somewhere now and I feel bad for the patients.
 
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Same we got resident mid ca-1 from closed program and it was almost better to not have them despite extra call taker
 
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What was so bad about them?
It’s like affirmative action with taking bad residents.

Some may be good. Some are already behind the 8 ball when they enter residency. So you don’t know who or what type of person you are truly getting.
 
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It has seemed to be true over the last 2 and a half decades. By the time the ACGME shuts down a program (takes a few years of warnings), the quality of residents that they have at the time of shut down tends to be well below average, as noted above. No super competitive medical student with lots of choices is going to go to a program that is circling the drain. Then, it becomes an act of charity for the other programs to accept these residents into their programs.
It should be expected that they will be VERY far behind after training in a bad program (for 1-3 years) with little to no support after they started the program as a below average candidate. It is a recipe that should be fairly predictable. There will be some diamonds in the rough, but I think it plays out as expected far more often than not. The accepting program then has the burden of accepting that they will have a resident that will likely struggle to pass boards etc and that will hurt their own program's board pass rates, which is a major factor in how a program is evaluated by the ACGME. Those failures will take 5 years to cycle off of the ABA/RRC's books, so taking 1 resident to a mid size program can drop your pass rate from 100% to 90% real quick. If they take 2 or more, watch out. Bigger programs can absorb more before the hit is noticeable, but the program director's pain will be similar.
 
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There are 2 populations of orphaned residents. One set comes from reputable programs where the entire academic hospital shuts down a la Hahnemann. The bulk of these residents are probably not below average. The second set are probably as @Gern Blansten describes. Unfortunately at least some of the Oak Hill residents may be in the 2nd group.
 
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There are 2 populations of orphaned residents. One set comes from reputable programs where the entire academic hospital shuts down a la Hahnemann. The bulk of these residents are probably not below average. The second set are probably as @Gern Blansten describes. Unfortunately at least some of the Oak Hill residents may be in the 2nd group.
We can only hope that the increased competitiveness of anesthesia means that even residents at the bottom barrel residencies are better than their historical counterparts.
 
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We can only hope that the increased competitiveness of anesthesia means that even residents at the bottom barrel residencies are better than their historical counterparts.

What exactly makes a bottom barrel resident? I mean the usual things we look at (board scores, clinical grades, class rank) to distinguish the hierarchy are fairly useless when looking at professional abilities.

Outside of professionalism issues (real ones) or just gross incompetence and not teachable, most residents are kind of similar (and the top programs are by no means free of these issues).
 
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I mean the usual things we look at (board scores, clinical grades, class rank) to distinguish the hierarchy are fairly useless when looking at professional abilities.
Board scores and grades don't tell the whole story, but in my experience as an attending at a training institution for the last 5+ years, there is certainly a correlation between scoring well on those things and being able to learn and incorporate the required knowledge base of the full scope of anesthesiology. Plus, the better learner / test taker you are, the easier it is spend a significant amount of time on the practical portions of anesthesia rather than worrying if you're going to bomb the ITE or fail ABA Basic.

Outside of professionalism issues (real ones) or just gross incompetence and not teachable, most residents are kind of similar (and the top programs are by no means free of these issues).
I suspect residents who had professionalism issues / work ethic issues / gross incompetence noted on their MSPE are much more likely to match at an HCA residency than at a solid mid-tier state university program.
 
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