gegogi

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Ok. I understand Co3+ =[Ar]3d6. No electrons in the 3s orbital. So, the # of the outermost valence electrons is 6 in the 3d orbital only!

What if Co1+? Co1+=[Ar]4s13d7. So the # of the outermost valence elctrons is 1 in the 4s orbital? or 8(one in the 4s, 7 in the 3d)?
 

llungu

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it's 8 -- you count everything outside of the noble gas configuration.. and Co2+ would have 7 valence electrons, all in the 3d orbital
 

nartnad

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Co: [Ar]4s23d7
Co+: [Ar]4s23d6
Co2+: [Ar]4s23d5
Co3+: [Ar]4s13d5

...right?
 

nartnad

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nope im wrong....

http://chemed.chem.purdue.edu/genchem/topicreview/bp/ch12/trans.php

"The electron configuration of a neutral cobalt atom is written as follows.

Co: [Ar] 4s2 3d7

The discussion of the relative energies of the atomic orbitals suggests that the 4s orbital has a lower energy than the 3d orbitals. Thus, we might expect cobalt to lose electrons from the higher energy 3d orbitals, but this is not what is observed. The Co2+ and Co3+ ions have the following electron configurations.

Co2+: [Ar] 3d7

Co3+: [Ar] 3d6

In general, electrons are removed from the valence-shell s orbitals before they are removed from valence d orbitals when transition metals are ionized."
 

alanan84

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Why do yall keep putting [Ar]? Isn't it [Ne]?