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older students in Australia

Discussion in 'Australasia and Oceania' started by Knockout Mouse, Apr 17, 2007.

  1. Knockout Mouse

    Knockout Mouse 2+ Year Member

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    Mar 5, 2007
    Sydney
    Could anyone comment as to how receptive Australian medical schools are to older, non-traditional type students.

    I am a 39 year old applicant. That is certainly not a common age for applicants in the USA, but it is not ridiculous either. Is it the same in Australia? or should I not even bother trying?

    I would be an international applicant, and I guess the schools I'm most concerned with are Flinders, U Sydney and U Queensland. I went to the school websites but they didn't have any demographic data on their student bodies.
     
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  3. JoeNamaMD

    JoeNamaMD Banned Banned

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    I was over 30 when I applied to the University of Queensland, they welcome older students here, in fact I believe the average age of students is 28. The only thing is that you have a time limit before the university will no longer count your previous higher education, that is why I studied medical science for a year before enrolling in medical school.
     
  4. Winged Scapula

    Winged Scapula Cougariffic! Staff Member Administrator Physician Faculty Lifetime Donor Classifieds Approved 15+ Year Member

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    I was also over 30 when I was at Flinders and we had several older than me, including one in his early 50s. I genuinely think age is less of a problem at the Aussie schools than in the US.
     
  5. PEN15

    PEN15 Member 5+ Year Member

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    Jan 25, 2005
    Canada/Australia
    We have quite a few non-traditional students in my class... 30's and 40's and they seem to blend in quite nicely! They even come out to some of the med school functions.
     
  6. Knockout Mouse

    Knockout Mouse 2+ Year Member

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    Mar 5, 2007
    Sydney
    Thanks for the replies.
     
  7. driedcaribou

    driedcaribou Senior Member Moderator Emeritus 10+ Year Member

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    Oct 18, 2003
    I meant to reply to this earlier... but you make it sound like everyone over 30 doesn't know how to have fun!

    lol
     
  8. Drwanabe

    Drwanabe 2+ Year Member

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    Apr 14, 2007
    a guys, was reading your post and was wondering how long is medical school in australia? 4 years, 5 years, or any shorter programs like in canada at mcmaster that are three years?
     
  9. PEN15

    PEN15 Member 5+ Year Member

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    Canada/Australia
    lol... no they just like to have fun earlier in the day so that they can pack it in earlier.

    I'm considered "old" compared to some of my classmates and I'm in my early to mid 20's :eek:
     
  10. PEN15

    PEN15 Member 5+ Year Member

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    Jan 25, 2005
    Canada/Australia
    4, 5, or 6 depending on the school and the program it offers, i.e. undergraduate vs. graduate entry. You can get more information here.
     
  11. JoeNamaMD

    JoeNamaMD Banned Banned

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    A friend of mine who is an IMG who is over 30 told me about the Residency match in the States, he said it is becoming extremely difficult to get into a surgical subspecialty training program if you are over the age of 30. That being said, he said it was not uncommon to find older Residents in other fields. Anyhow, if I do not make it into US residency program, I will just stay in Australia, my family is in San Francisco and there are plenty of direct flights there, plus I will get more vacation time in Australia than I will in the States. Oddly enough I might be able to see them more often than I would if I worked in Chicago or NYC because I will get less vacation time. One thing I have to say is great about Australia is that a large percentage of Australians are able to travel overseas.
     
  12. Winged Scapula

    Winged Scapula Cougariffic! Staff Member Administrator Physician Faculty Lifetime Donor Classifieds Approved 15+ Year Member

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    '

    Sorry, but that is a bunch of hooey. I was well over 30 when I applied, as were several of my friends and acquaintances. Only once was I asked how I felt about finishing my residency after 40.

    While in the "old days" surgery may have been more conservative, considering that the average age of the US medical student is near 30 and the fact that most surgical residents - regardless of where they trained - are over 30, I find this hard to believe. With the exception of applicants who are seriously over the average age (ie, in their 50s and 60s and SDN even has a moderator who was over 50 when she started her surgical residency: njbmd), I don't think this claim is substantiated.
     
  13. redshifteffect

    redshifteffect Senior Member 10+ Year Member

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    One of my best mates at my school is old enough to be my grandfather!
     
  14. craig_rt

    craig_rt Member 7+ Year Member

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    Dec 3, 2003
    Newcastle, AUSTRALIA
    There are plenty in my year at Newcastle that are in their 30s and 40s (including me). At Newcastle they pro-rata the intake, so if the applications break down to 75% school leavers and 25% "mature" entry then that is the proportion that is accepted.
     
  15. secret

    secret Panadeine Forte 2+ Year Member

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    Jun 19, 2007
    Sydney
    I plan to apply to undergraduate medicine in 2009. I'm 22 now, therefore I will be 24 when I apply-that's much older then the usual applicants. :p

    I don't believe they will incorporate age into the equation when assessing your suitability and competitiveness.
     

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