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Ortho Intern year Preparation

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allojay

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Hi everyone,

I recently matched into an Ortho program and was doing an extensive online search on how to prepare as an Ortho intern. Most of the posts were dated and I was hoping to get a more current idea of what I can do to prepare before intern year begins. So far, I've seen people say either, 'don't study and just relax till it starts' or say, 'Read A,B, and C.' From my search, a lot of people have recommended AAOS Basic science (if so, which chapters should I read?), Netter's, Hoppenfeld approaches, Orthobullets, Hoppenfeld Physical exam, Orthopedic tolerances, skeletal trauma, Millers, Rockwood & Green, etc.

I guess my question is that, being someone who knows nearly nothing about Ortho, what's the best way to begin from scratch and develop my Orthopedic knowledge in an appropriate manner? I'm hoping to nail down a lot of the basic science bone stuff and biomechanics before I start in July.

Thanks for all your help!
 

allojay

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I answered this in my AMA thread. See link below.
ortho attending AMA

Thank you!! I'll take a look at what you have to say.


edit: Thanks for answering the question!

Which Chapters from Skeletal trauma would you recommend to read? It's quite a hefty book. Should I aim to read all of it?
 
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Thank you!! I'll take a look at what you have to say.


edit: Thanks for answering the question!

Which Chapters from Skeletal trauma would you recommend to read? It's quite a hefty book. Should I aim to read all of it?
No. Not all of it. You won't remember it unless you have something clinical to correlate it with.
Not sure what edition you have, but read the chapters on: biology, biomechanics, principles of exfix, principles of internal fixation. That's the minimum. If you then have time and want to really torture yourself during your vacation, read the chapters on multitrauma, damage control, compartment syndrome, and open fractures.
 
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allojay

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No. Not all of it. You won't remember it unless you have something clinical to correlate it with.
Not sure what edition you have, but read the chapters on: biology, biomechanics, principles of exfix, principles of internal fixation. That's the minimum. If you then have time and want to really torture yourself during your vacation, read the chapters on multitrauma, damage control, compartment syndrome, and open fractures.


Thanks a lot! I really appreciate you taking the time to respond. I'll get started on the bare minimum stuff.
 

FutureDoc1088

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Just study for and take Step 3 before you forget everything you know. It’s actually not a bad thing to do regardless since most programs do at least 6 months of general surgery and you will be managing a lot of “medicine” as an intern. It’s easier to do now than finding time as an intern as I discovered.
 
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allojay

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Just study for and take Step 3 before you forget everything you know. It’s actually not a bad thing to do regardless since most programs do at least 6 months of general surgery and you will be managing a lot of “medicine” as an intern. It’s easier to do now than finding time as an intern as I discovered.

Thanks! I've already started some light Step 3 studying and I'm leaning towards taking it early due to me having my core medicine rotations earlier in the year.
 
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