hk64

7+ Year Member
Mar 29, 2011
76
4
Status
Pre-Dental
Hello,
I am a dental student thinking about Orthodontic residency.
I am D1 student yet, so I don't know how my GPA and board exams will go until D3, but I have question to ask.
I was looking for so-called Orthodontic program ranking, or threads about ortho programs, but wasn't successful gathering much information. As far as I understand, it seems there are not specific ranking (of course), since only handful of students match into each school, and the stats would not be that significant anyway.

But, is there any overall, broad categories for the most competitive (most preferred) to least competitive? For example, although we don't have "ranking" for dental schools, many people understand Stony Brook, Harvard, and etc. are generally preferred to many other schools. So, can you let me know if there are any "superb" ortho programs that are well known for being most competitive and student-preferred? (I read many posts indicating UNC ortho is especially difficult to match into) What about ivy school? (Harvard, columbia?)

Also, perhaps, since the GPA is subjective for each school, ranking would be the most important factor to match into ortho program (board exams are pass/fail, and I am doubtful if they discriminate heavily on GRE scores). So, what would be acceptable rankings for those ortho programs?

If you know the stats who matched into orthodontics, that would be very helpful.

Thank you!
 
Jan 5, 2014
15
3
Status
Dentist
There are no official rankings for orthodontic programs. As long as you gain admission to a CODA accredited orthodontics residency program, as long as you make the most of your experience, you will be provided with the proper foundation to become an orthodontist. You can do a search for all the accredited programs on this website: http://www.ada.org/5502.aspx

Beyond that, factors that make a program more or less attractive are very individual. For some, location is top priority, while for others, cost is the most important. Some programs are more research-oriented than others. You can glean this information by looking at program websites.

I actually think that GRE scores are more important than before now that NBDE is Pass/Fail, so it would be prudent to prepare well and try to achieve top marks on this exam, particularly on Verbal and Writing sections, where the majority of applicants tend to falter. Also, doing well on the exam will open up more doors for you and allow you to apply to schools that require the GRE.

Best of luck to you!
 

HKBB

5+ Year Member
Sep 8, 2012
173
14
Status
There are no official rankings for orthodontic programs. As long as you gain admission to a CODA accredited orthodontics residency program, as long as you make the most of your experience, you will be provided with the proper foundation to become an orthodontist. You can do a search for all the accredited programs on this website: http://www.ada.org/5502.aspx

Beyond that, factors that make a program more or less attractive are very individual. For some, location is top priority, while for others, cost is the most important. Some programs are more research-oriented than others. You can glean this information by looking at program websites.

I actually think that GRE scores are more important than before now that NBDE is Pass/Fail, so it would be prudent to prepare well and try to achieve top marks on this exam, particularly on Verbal and Writing sections, where the majority of applicants tend to falter. Also, doing well on the exam will open up more doors for you and allow you to apply to schools that require the GRE.

Best of luck to you!
GRE exams really have that much importance in admissions?
 

jeffity

7+ Year Member
Oct 23, 2009
2,536
258
Status
Dentist
I don't follow this stuff much because specializing isn't on my radar, but I just happened to read a little about this everything going pass-fail thing the other day. The file isn't in front of me (on home computer), but it was a survey of ~300 postdoc program directors, and 1/3 of them didn't see a need for a new exam. The top criteria for application review, interviewing, and selection were LOEs. Other stuff was ranked highly (rank, gpa, essay, etc), but letters edged out everything at each step of the process. The exception was OMS and I think perio in the selection step. Letters weren't #1 then. OMS was the one that stood out as emphasizing academic ability and ECs. I just see people on here mention letters when applicants are worried about going to a P/F school on top of P/F part I. This was just the first time I read something about it and it was kind of interesting.
 

HKBB

5+ Year Member
Sep 8, 2012
173
14
Status
I don't follow this stuff much because specializing isn't on my radar, but I just happened to read a little about this everything going pass-fail thing the other day. The file isn't in front of me (on home computer), but it was a survey of ~300 postdoc program directors, and 1/3 of them didn't see a need for a new exam. The top criteria for application review, interviewing, and selection were LOEs. Other stuff was ranked highly (rank, gpa, essay, etc), but letters edged out everything at each step of the process. The exception was OMS and I think perio in the selection step. Letters weren't #1 then. OMS was the one that stood out as emphasizing academic ability and ECs. I just see people on here mention letters when applicants are worried about going to a P/F school on top of P/F part I. This was just the first time I read something about it and it was kind of interesting.
Hey, do you mind sending this survey that you read about?
 
Jan 5, 2014
15
3
Status
Dentist
GRE exams really have that much importance in admissions?
I do not think that the GRE exam is the #1 criteria in admissions, but I believe it is one of the factors that can differentiate you from an otherwise extremely competitive applicant pool. Think about it this way - adcoms expect the applicant to do just "average" on the exam, which means you can stand out if you have a high score!

Of the top factors that adcoms consider when reviewing the applicant file, I believe they are ordered in the following manner starting with most important: 1) Academic achievement, 2) Test scores (where available), 3) Letters of Recommendation and Personal Narrative, 4) Research experience (if the program is research-oriented) and 5) other activities (student government, volunteering, extracurricular (non-dental school))

I'd also like to make a comment about schools that are P/F. I graduated from a technically P/F dental school, but there were definitely ways that the administration stratified our level of achievement within our class, i.e. High performers were in the 1st and 2nd years were awarded special letters that were placed in the student's file and 3rd and 4th years were graded H/P/F. When it came time for the Dean to write the institution letters, he/she would refer to the student file and total the number of special letters and tally the total number of units for which an "Honors" designation was awarded. At the end of the day, schools find one way or another to differentiate students from one another.

Best wishes!
 
Last edited:
Oct 24, 2012
1,892
884
Status
Resident [Any Field]
I'd also like to make a comment about schools that are P/F. I graduated from a technically P/F dental school, but there were definitely ways that the administration stratified our level of achievement within our class, i.e. High performers were in the 1st and 2nd years were awarded special letters that were placed in the student's file and 3rd and 4th years were graded H/P/F. When it came time for the Dean to write the institution letters, he/she would refer to the student file and total the number of special letters and tally the total number of units for which an "Honors" designation was awarded. At the end of the day, schools find one way or another to differentiate students from one another.
Are you at UCSF?
 
Jan 5, 2014
15
3
Status
Dentist
Are you at UCSF?
I'm not at UCSF. I'm trying to make a larger point, though: It doesn't matter whether your school has P/F, H/P/F, grade point averages or letter grades - administration always has a method for stratifying the performance of students in a class. One's approach to achieving a particular academic goal shouldn't vary much from school to school.
 
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Jan 8, 2014
2
0
Status
Pre-Pharmacy
yes,OMS was the one that stood out as emphasizing academic ability and ECs. I just see people on here mention letters when applicants are worried about going to a P/F school on top of P/F part I. This was just the first time I read something about it and it was kind of interesting.