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bubbajones

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hey guys,
Im an undergad down in texas and my school offers pathophysiology. should I take it? I am a bio major, but this class can't count towards my major. write back.
 

Neuronix

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Sure, might be helpful. I wouldn't take it if it's going to count for nothing... If you could make it some sort of elective, I'd go for it. I thought my ugrad Physiology class was pretty helpful for both the MCAT and for giving me a basic framework for some of the stuff in med school.
 

bubbajones

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HERE IS A DESCRIPTION OF THE COURSE:

BIO 346 PATHOPHYSIOLOGY. A study of basic physiological systems and underlying system dysfunctions associated with human disease processes across the life span. Relationships between etiologic agents and their consequence to human form and function will be stressed. Critical thinking processes integrating symptoms, treatment and prognosis will be applied to physiological perspectives. This course is designed for prenursing and other health and allied health majors; credit in this course cannot be applied to either a major or minor in biology. Four hours lecture per week. Prerequisites: CHM 135/115, BIO 245, 246. Credit 4.
 
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IlianaSedai

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Hard to tell what they're actually teaching, from reading that description. So I will answer on the assumption that it's a GOOD and well-taught course.

1. You don't need it to prepare for med school. Chances are, you are likely to forget whatever you learn (and it probably won't be entirely the same as what you'd learn in med school anyway) by the time your second year of med school rolls around.

2. It *could* give you an idea of what sort of stuff you learn in your pre-clinical years. You don't need it, but it could be like a trailer or sneak-preview.

3. Taking a class with pre-nursing and other allied health students is way different from doing the same with pre-med or med. It may not be nearly as rigorous or as challenging as you'd like. It could turn out :wow: boring.

Also, taking some physiology may help you a LITTLE toward having a framework in MS-I (like neuronix -- I never did, and I did fine); but the "patho" part generally comes in during MS-II -- at which time any advantage will be expired and long gone.
 

Willamette

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If pathophysiology turns you on (figuratively speaking of course) then by all means take it. On the other hand, once you're in medical school you will get PLENTY of it. My suggestion is to take a totally non-medical school related course, especially if there is something offered that sounds FUN. As a senior, I remember taking a history class about mining-towns of the old west, and another seminar course on "Adventures of Huckleberry Finn." They were both a kick in the pants, and I feel that my horizons were widened because of them. If you're near the end, kick up your heels some.

Willamette
 

bubbajones

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Today my Ochem teacher said that there was more chemistry in med school than biology. IS THIS TRUE?
Im a sophomore and I just wanted to take some courses that could prepare me for med school. (Besides the pre-req's)
 

jed2023

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Taking a pathophysiology course is probably the closest you'll likely get in undergrad to developing the kind of thinking that they expect of med students by the end of 2nd year. If the course is any good, by the end you should be able to think about disease processes, apply the relevant physiology and anatomy, and figure out how and why various organ systems typically become disordered (i.e., diseased).

I agree with a previous poster, though, that, if the course is designed primarily for pre-nursing and allied health folks (no disrespect intended) it probably won't be nearly as rigorous as med school pathophys. And so it may not be as useful. But if you are interested in it, it might serve as a good introduction.


In response to Bubbajones,

"Today my Ochem teacher said that there was more chemistry in med school than biology. IS THIS TRUE?
Im a sophomore and I just wanted to take some courses that could prepare me for med school. (Besides the pre-req's)"

That's a load of crock. The biological sciences predominant over the chemical sciences in med school by far. Some basic chemistry is necessary for sure, especially for acid/base physiology in the renal sections, but it's stuff like knowing moles, units of concentration, Henderson-Hasselbach, and the effects of acid and bases on titration curves. Some biochemistry is also necessary but most med schools will teach you the amount that you need to know. The O Chem they make you go through will not show up much in the future. That's mostly for weed out purposes.
 
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Blade28

Originally posted by bubbajones
Today my Ochem teacher said that there was more chemistry in med school than biology. IS THIS TRUE?
Im a sophomore and I just wanted to take some courses that could prepare me for med school. (Besides the pre-req's)
Uh...no. Did your teacher ever go to med school? Probably not.

Just trying to scare you, maybe?
 

BiggMann79

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Originally posted by bubbajones
Today my Ochem teacher said that there was more chemistry in med school than biology. IS THIS TRUE?
Im a sophomore and I just wanted to take some courses that could prepare me for med school. (Besides the pre-req's)
I swear all the organic chemistry I needed for med school I learned in the first 3 weeks of organic chemistry I. Some of the basic chemistry concepts learned in gen chem are used from time to time, but not organic chemistry. Now I may change my tune next year when I'm taking pharmacology. My roommate is in pharmacy school and they use a lot of organic chemistry, but pharmacy school pharmacology is a lot different from medical school pharmacology.
 

rxfudd

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There is absolutely ZERO organic chem in pharm. The most organic I needed to know through the first two years has been knowing what a carbon ring looks like for biochem. Virtually ZERO organic chem in the entire first two years. Almost zero chem at all, in fact. Bio is by far the leader here. And don't even get me started on all that physics crap we had to learn in college (especially E&M...what a load....).

Originally posted by BiggMann79
I swear all the organic chemistry I needed for med school I learned in the first 3 weeks of organic chemistry I. Some of the basic chemistry concepts learned in gen chem are used from time to time, but not organic chemistry. Now I may change my tune next year when I'm taking pharmacology. My roommate is in pharmacy school and they use a lot of organic chemistry, but pharmacy school pharmacology is a lot different from medical school pharmacology.
 

BiggMann79

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Originally posted by rxfudd
There is absolutely ZERO organic chem in pharm. The most organic I needed to know through the first two years has been knowing what a carbon ring looks like for biochem. Virtually ZERO organic chem in the entire first two years. Almost zero chem at all, in fact. Bio is by far the leader here. And don't even get me started on all that physics crap we had to learn in college (especially E&M...what a load....).
I didn't figure pharmacology would require any organic chemistry, but didn't want to speak for something I was not sure about. Really the only thing from organic that I needed to learn for biochemistry was what those carbon stick figures meant.
 
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