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Ph.D. Programs within Medical Schools?

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PreDrANB

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Hi all,

I'm in the process of researching Ph.D. (clinical child) programs to apply to next year, and I've found that 2 of my top 5 programs are housed within medical schools. I currently work in a hospital and am very interested in working in a hospital/medical setting for my internship and throughout my career. I'm wondering, however if there is a particular reputation or understanding about phd programs within medical schools of which I am not aware.

Thank you!!
 

PsyDr

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Might help if you list the program's you are considering. Feinberg, Loyola, Drexel, etc all come to mind
 

DynamicDidactic

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I thought there were only 2 clinical psych PhD programs expressly housed in medical schools, Northwestern Feinberg School of Medicine and UT Southwestern Medical Center.

I do not think there is a reputation or bias. Northwestern comes with a 50% tuition waiver but its still more money than I think is worthwhile. Not sure about UT.

I think the consensus is that both provide fine clinical training and research experience.
 

PsychScience

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I thought there were only 2 clinical psych PhD programs expressly housed in medical schools, Northwestern Feinberg School of Medicine and UT Southwestern Medical Center.

I do not think there is a reputation or bias. Northwestern comes with a 50% tuition waiver but its still more money than I think is worthwhile. Not sure about UT.

I think the consensus is that both provide fine clinical training and research experience.


Rosalind Franklin also comes to mind. I believe this is another school that also only does 50% tuition remission, but also has a lower match rate than I would look for in a program.
 

DynamicDidactic

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Rosalind Franklin also comes to mind. I believe this is another school that also only does 50% tuition remission, but also has a lower match rate than I would look for in a program.
Rosalind's clinical program is in the College of Health Professions not the Chicago Medical School.
 

PreDrANB

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Yes, sorry, I'm looking at the Feinberg and UT Southwestern Medical Center programs.

but its still more money than I think is worthwhile.

Why do you think this?

Thanks, guys. This is all really helpful!
 

Ollie123

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Can't answer for DD specifically, but I do second his statement.

Its not that it is in any way bad program. Just that in a field where the "norm" is a ~100% waiver and a ~$20,000 salary on top of that, a program would need to offer something pretty incredible to justify the expense. Thus, its significantly more expensive than the competition and relatively unremarkable. A Camry is a great car, but if a dealer was offering one at the price of a Porsche it probably wouldn't be my first choice. Though I'd certainly attend that in a heartbeat over the "Ford Pinto for the price of a spaceship" programs, of which there are plenty.
 

WisNeuro

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Statement thirded. No reason to pay an exorbitant amount of money for something that you can get paid to do. These programs aren't offering superior training compared to funded programs. I'd rather be maxing out my 401k and personal IRA's after getting a job than paying off six figure loan debt and having no realistic timeline to retirement.
 

DynamicDidactic

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I should add that the Virginia Consortium is partial housed in a medical school (its a program that is shared among 3 institutions).
 

cinepsych

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I'd like to chime in, even though this thread is a bit older -- When making decisions about what schools to apply to, I looked at these programs as well, and interviewed at one; and was subsequently accepted.

The tradeoff at that program in exchange for not being 100% funded was the opportunity to define my own research path (no set mentor until year 3, unless I wanted one), and a clinically focused APA-accredited Ph.D. program that would be complete in 4 years, including captive internship at two different APA accredited internship sites chosen from a handful of possibilities (most of which are, of course, clinical health psychology related). But it has some downside -- less research education, less time/chance for publication, high-stress and high-demand year-round schedule -- and potential debt.

I get it. It's expensive. I wasn't jazzed at the idea of paying (more!) tuition. But not having to do the internship match and being able to have two different internship sites is unique. And hitting postdoc two years early is appealing. Ultimately you have to weigh the pros and cons for yourself and decide what's right for you.
 
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DynamicDidactic

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I'd like to chime in, even though this thread is a bit older -- When making decisions about what schools to apply to, I looked at these programs as well, and interviewed at one; and was subsequently accepted.

The tradeoff at that program in exchange for not being 100% funded was the opportunity to define my own research path (no set mentor until year 3, unless I wanted one), and a clinically focused APA-accredited Ph.D. program that would be complete in 4 years, including captive internship at two different APA accredited internship sites chosen from a handful of possibilities (most of which are, of course, clinical health psychology related). But it has some downside -- less research education, less time/chance for publication, high-stress and high-demand year-round schedule -- and potential debt.

I get it. It's expensive. I wasn't jazzed at the idea of paying (more!) tuition. But not having to do the internship match and being able to have two different internship sites is unique. And hitting postdoc two years early is appealing. Ultimately you have to weigh the pros and cons for yourself and decide what's right for you.
well stated, I think this is the other side of the coin
 

PreDrANB

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I'd like to chime in, even though this thread is a bit older -- When making decisions about what schools to apply to, I looked at these programs as well, and interviewed at one; and was subsequently accepted.

The tradeoff at that program in exchange for not being 100% funded was the opportunity to define my own research path (no set mentor until year 3, unless I wanted one), and a clinically focused APA-accredited Ph.D. program that would be complete in 4 years, including captive internship at two different APA accredited internship sites chosen from a handful of possibilities (most of which are, of course, clinical health psychology related). But it has some downside -- less research education, less time/chance for publication, high-stress and high-demand year-round schedule -- and potential debt.

I get it. It's expensive. I wasn't jazzed at the idea of paying (more!) tuition. But not having to do the internship match and being able to have two different internship sites is unique. And hitting postdoc two years early is appealing. Ultimately you have to weigh the pros and cons for yourself and decide what's right for you.

Not entirely sure why it took me a year to see this reply, but thank you! The problem I'm currently facing is that one of these schools has steadily emerged as my top choice as far as POI's go. I'm concerned about debt but I'm wondering if the potential for a perfect match with a POI's interests is worth it? I'm not in any debt from my undergrad so it isn't like I'd just be piling it on, and my SO works in the tech industry so he is willing and able to support my living expenses. But still...... all those zeros.......
 

psych.meout

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Not entirely sure why it took me a year to see this reply, but thank you! The problem I'm currently facing is that one of these schools has steadily emerged as my top choice as far as POI's go. I'm concerned about debt but I'm wondering if the potential for a perfect match with a POI's interests is worth it? I'm not in any debt from my undergrad so it isn't like I'd just be piling it on, and my SO works in the tech industry so he is willing and able to support my living expenses. But still...... all those zeros.......

If you're talking about Feinberg, I think they say that on their website that average debt load for students graduating the program is about $60,000. Combine that with the high cost of living in Chicago and you might be significantly more in debt than that.

Another wrinkle might be practica competition. With so many excellent clinical programs in the area (e.g. UIC, DePaul, Loyola, both Northwestern programs), I've heard there's pretty intense competition for external practica. I've also heard from some people who have attended a couple of these programs that some sites tend to favor students coming from their affiliated program, e.g. sites at the UIC hospital and med school program tend to favor UIC students.
 
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