FrkyBgStok

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Sorry for the long post. 5 years ago I took physics at a local university and got a C in the class, A in the lab. I am currently retaking it at another 4 year college for 4 credits with incorporated lab.

So with my work schedule and class schedule for next semester I ran into a dilemma. I work nights and if I attend biochem class and physics 2 class and lab it would require me to be up for 36 hours straight every week. I emailed my physics professor (who I have developed a rapport with) and asked if we could work something out so I didn't have to attend lab at the scheduled time, and I reminded him it is a retake so I don't NEED the lab. He said, "Yes, you can play around with the new stuff I bought and help me create experiments for physics I and II." Basically word for word.

My question is would this be considered physics research? It doesn't really fall into typical research. If it isn't research could it be considered anything that would be beneficial for my app, or do I just chalk it up as the professor bending over backwards to help me and take the 4 credits.

I plan on applying next summer with a pretty good (not overly amazing) application to DO schools (and my state MD). I won't really have any research when I apply as I work 2 jobs and volunteer as it is. Any insight?

Thanks for the help.
 

DrBowtie

Final Countdown
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Sorry for the long post. 5 years ago I took physics at a local university and got a C in the class, A in the lab. I am currently retaking it at another 4 year college for 4 credits with incorporated lab.

So with my work schedule and class schedule for next semester I ran into a dilemma. I work nights and if I attend biochem class and physics 2 class and lab it would require me to be up for 36 hours straight every week. I emailed my physics professor (who I have developed a rapport with) and asked if we could work something out so I didn't have to attend lab at the scheduled time, and I reminded him it is a retake so I don't NEED the lab. He said, "Yes, you can play around with the new stuff I bought and help me create experiments for physics I and II." Basically word for word.

My question is would this be considered physics research? It doesn't really fall into typical research. If it isn't research could it be considered anything that would be beneficial for my app, or do I just chalk it up as the professor bending over backwards to help me and take the 4 credits.

I plan on applying next summer with a pretty good (not overly amazing) application to DO schools (and my state MD). I won't really have any research when I apply as I work 2 jobs and volunteer as it is. Any insight?

Thanks for the help.
Kinda sounds like a TA thing rather than research.
 

n3xa

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I'd call it more research than anything, but it depends on what you contribute to the project.

I have friends in the chemical education department who do something similar.
 

Lokhtar

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It's not research, it's more a TA.

Research = helping to advance the knowledge of the discipline in some way. I don't think you'll find much new in Mechanics that Newton missed.