1. What do you find most helpful? Give us your feedback on the 2019 SDN Member Survey to help further the SDN mission (and win prizes!)
    Dismiss Notice
  2. This forum is for support and discussion only. Please promote test prep materials/services (including AMAs) in the Special Offers subforum only. Thanks!
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Guest, be sure to check out How To Get Into Dental School, our free downloadable PDF with step-by-step details for dental school applicants!
    Dismiss Notice
  4. Dismiss Notice

Plasmide in recombinant DNA?

Discussion in 'DAT Discussions' started by Dencology, Nov 30, 2008.

  1. Dencology

    2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2008
    Messages:
    396
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Pre-Dental
    guys:

    what is the role of plasmide in recombinant DNA?
     
  2. Sublimation

    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2008
    Messages:
    574
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Pre-Dental
    Im not sure but i think its their ability to replicate autonomously.
     
  3. Zubnaya Feya

    Zubnaya Feya Combinator
    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2008
    Messages:
    971
    Likes Received:
    2
    Status:
    Dental Student
    In order to get the gene of interest into the genome of a species researchers mostly use plasmid vectors and then viruses.

    1) You make a plasmid construct (circular DNA containing gene of interest, promoter, enhancer, other elements needed for survival in bacterial cell) via restriction digestion, ligation, etc

    2) You transform (transformation = taking up something inside something...) bacteria with the plasmid, let the bacteria grow - plasmid replicates with the bacterial genome.

    3) You collect the replicated plasmid

    4) Then you could use the plasmid in combination with packaging vectors to create a virus, transfect the cells of interest (stem cells or smth).

    5) The virus gets into the cells, recombination occurs (they use lenti or retroviruses usually) and the gene of interest (that was present in the plasmid) integrates into genomic DNA of cells.

    6) Then you can transfer the cells back into the organism and see the phenotype.

    ... I hope I didn't leave out anything.
     

Share This Page