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naegleria brain

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I know; they're very different, and I like both. Could you guys help me to list pros and cons for each. Also, is there such a thing as a plastics sub-I so I can figure out if I really like it as much as I'm dreaming or not? I mean, the or-live stuff I've seen and those that I've shadowed for followups are all awesome, and ENT-craniofacial reconstructive is sweet too. But neurosurgery has all the cool tools for spine, actually get to work with the brain (esp in epilepsy).

In terms of job security, both are very secure, though plastics are soon going to have to compete with breast-fellowship general surgeons for all the breasts. Then again, neuro-spines compete with ortho-spines tho the numbers are so low it doesn't even factor, and eventually neuroradiologists, though it seems most neurosurgeons are now trained in neuroradiology as well.

Salary, I think neurosurgeons have the edge, but at the sacrifice of working your butt off and a decent work-schedule.

Impact/research/innovation neurosurgery clearly has, though plastics may require more creativity.

Anyone else deliberated between the two and have some insight?

Residency, plastics is probably easier, but harder to get into. And i think it's stupid to make a lifelong career choice based on how tough the residency is.
 

Green Pirate

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I'm no expert in this matter, but it obviously comes down to personal preference. What kind of work do you prefer doing? Plastic surgery is involved in beautification (especially if you decide to open up a private practice) and cosmetics, so the type of patients you deal with will be different, and you will be providing a much different type of service than a neurosurgeon. In many ways, I think private practice plastic surgery (say that 3 times fast!) is one of the most business oriented areas doctors can get into. You are actually selling a product that isn't really essential. No one <i>needs</i> double D breasts...but it's your job to sell your product, show them how nice they might look with fuller breasts, or a crow lift or whatever. I'm not exactly sure how plastic surgery works in a hosptial environment since I don't have much experience with that, but this is how things are in private practice.

In neurosurgery you deal more with life and death (unless you become a spine doc in which case your lifestyle might be more like a plastic surgeon), and the patients you deal with will be sick and <i>need</i> you. There is a lot more frustration and disappointment in nsg than plastics from what I hear.

Of course, I am in neither of these professions (yet, at least ;) ), but this is just what I've gathered from reading, observations, and hearsay.
 

hans19

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I know; they're very different, and I like both. Could you guys help me to list pros and cons for each. Also, is there such a thing as a plastics sub-I so I can figure out if I really like it as much as I'm dreaming or not? I mean, the or-live stuff I've seen and those that I've shadowed for followups are all awesome, and ENT-craniofacial reconstructive is sweet too. But neurosurgery has all the cool tools for spine, actually get to work with the brain (esp in epilepsy).

In terms of job security, both are very secure, though plastics are soon going to have to compete with breast-fellowship general surgeons for all the breasts. Then again, neuro-spines compete with ortho-spines tho the numbers are so low it doesn't even factor, and eventually neuroradiologists, though it seems most neurosurgeons are now trained in neuroradiology as well.

Salary, I think neurosurgeons have the edge, but at the sacrifice of working your butt off and a decent work-schedule.

Impact/research/innovation neurosurgery clearly has, though plastics may require more creativity.

Anyone else deliberated between the two and have some insight?

Residency, plastics is probably easier, but harder to get into. And i think it's stupid to make a lifelong career choice based on how tough the residency is.

Both make bank, which would you rather do all day? Boobs or spine?
 
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naegleria brain

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true for the money...

i think plastics is cooler, more creativity. but complex spine involves a good deal of creativity too. furthermore, i think spine would be better if i wanted to leave medicine to market a new tool/screw/cage or some other cool toy. plastics would too, but i'm not sure to the same degree.

my thing with plastics is - if i do cosmetic stuff, i think it's been shown that once they pop - they just can't stop, to put it bluntly (they keep comin back for more surgery). and i'm not sure if i'll be happy with myself that i'm profiting off their psychologic weakness (weakness may be a bad term, but u know what i mean)
 

Green Pirate

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my thing with plastics is - if i do cosmetic stuff, i think it's been shown that once they pop - they just can't stop, to put it bluntly (they keep comin back for more surgery). and i'm not sure if i'll be happy with myself that i'm profiting off their psychologic weakness (weakness may be a bad term, but u know what i mean)

Dr. Godless, M.D. thinks you have a bad case of "morals.":thumbdown:

I'm kidding. kind of.
 

danielmd06

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I would recommend you trust your instincts about what you really like better, and what you can see yourself happiest in practicing.

If you are interested in other surgical specialties, then you might also consider that Plastics fellowships are available through an ENT residency, and Ophthamology offers an Oculoplastics fellowship. So there are additional options to Plastics besides completing a General Surgery residency.

Best of luck in your decision.
 

Northerner

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In many ways, I think private practice plastic surgery (say that 3 times fast!)...

I heard if you say it 3 times fast into a mirror with the lights out, Michael Jackson will appear and try to have a slumber party with you. Same sleeping bag.

No way am I doing that, I don't care how high my heating bill gets.
 

naegleria brain

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ok...question for you all

it seems that a lot of the skull-base stuff nsg do is with ENTs. are craniofacial fellowships available to nsg's to eliminate the ENT assistant?

don't have anything against ENT's. I just find that their part of the job is pretty damn sweet too, and i'd like to be able to do that
 

naegleria brain

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Dr. Godless, M.D. thinks you have a bad case of "morals.":thumbdown:

I'm kidding. kind of.

haha, sad thing is, i'm quite sure i'll abandon that thought process within the next year.

ill be honest, i came in to med school thinkin wow doctors savin the world from disease, infection, and cancer. first day in the ER, saw a four year old die, a 65 yr old 300pack-year for 30+ yrs smoker live, and an guy turned away. now i know medicine is a job, not my place to judge.

funny how one experience can change an entire ideal.


anyway, back to the question at hand, what are your guys' experience with plastic surgeons. unfortunately for me, dr. 90210 strikes me as a d-bag. turns out all the plastic surgeons here i've met haven't deviated far from the d-bag persona. oh yeah - mcsteamy from grey's anatomy too - complete d-bag.

is this true with a lot of plastics u know? i'm great at smiling and nodding and jumping along the bandwagon to kiss ass, but i'm not sure if i'll be happy doing that for years, then pretending to be one of them for a lifetime afterwards.

incidentally, i find the neurosurgeons to be much nerdier, more irritable, but real. short tempers no BS get-it-done persona. that's more me. so personality-wise i like neurosurgery, but actual work, i find both fascinating. i guess i'll have to wait for rotations to begin.
 

Green Pirate

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haha, sad thing is, i'm quite sure i'll abandon that thought process within the next year.

ill be honest, i came in to med school thinkin wow doctors savin the world from disease, infection, and cancer. first day in the ER, saw a four year old die, a 65 yr old 300pack-year for 30+ yrs smoker live, and an guy turned away. now i know medicine is a job, not my place to judge.

funny how one experience can change an entire ideal.


anyway, back to the question at hand, what are your guys' experience with plastic surgeons. unfortunately for me, dr. 90210 strikes me as a d-bag. turns out all the plastic surgeons here i've met haven't deviated far from the d-bag persona. oh yeah - mcsteamy from grey's anatomy too - complete d-bag.

is this true with a lot of plastics u know? i'm great at smiling and nodding and jumping along the bandwagon to kiss ass, but i'm not sure if i'll be happy doing that for years, then pretending to be one of them for a lifetime afterwards.

incidentally, i find the neurosurgeons to be much nerdier, more irritable, but real. short tempers no BS get-it-done persona. that's more me. so personality-wise i like neurosurgery, but actual work, i find both fascinating. i guess i'll have to wait for rotations to begin.

I shadowed a plastic surgeon in his private practice a while back and I found that he was VERY much Dr. 90120. Like I said, plastics is as much a business as it is a medical field so you have to have a sweet tongue. He's very successful though, and I think that's partly because of his rosey personality. I definitely know that plastics isn't a good match for me...good luck finding out for yourself though. I think the only way you'll be able to really figure this out is through experience.
 

dilated

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is this true with a lot of plastics u know? i'm great at smiling and nodding and jumping along the bandwagon to kiss ass, but i'm not sure if i'll be happy doing that for years, then pretending to be one of them for a lifetime afterwards.

incidentally, i find the neurosurgeons to be much nerdier, more irritable, but real. short tempers no BS get-it-done persona. that's more me. so personality-wise i like neurosurgery, but actual work, i find both fascinating. i guess i'll have to wait for rotations to begin.

I think it all depends on your location. The academics plastics guys I've met have almost all been nice, very sociable (much more than the nsgs), and smart as hell. I think it requires more social ability than most surgical specialties and they tend to be pretty happy. The private practice guys though.. well, sorry, but most of them have been ... "oily", for lack of a better adjective.
 
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