Smittyballz

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I was wondering if someone can tell me the major differences between the two. Besides prestige... Is one more qualified, Does one make more money ie have more job opportunities. Basically the main differences between allopathic and osteopathic please thx
 

megswinter82

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Well, first of all OD is an optometrist (i think). So I'm going to assume that you mean DO, which is doctor of osteopathic medicine. In terms of the differences, you might want to post on the Osteopathic or pre-osteo forums. I wouldn't say anything about "less prestigous" unless you want to get flamed. :luck:
 

Pemulis

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Historically, there were some philosophical differences between the two, but today the education of an MD and the education of a DO are for all intents and purposes identical. The work they do and their practice rights in the eyes of the law are also identical.

In theory there is basically no difference between the two. In reality, there are parts of the country where DO's aren't as well known, and there are still some resideny programs that have some bias in favor of MD's. Hence, MD's have a SLIGHT edge, all other things being equal, when it comes to landing a residency in a very prestigious program, or in a super competitive field like derm, rads, or plastics, for example. But this is a generalization; you will find many DO's in those fields. If you go to the Osteopathic forum, you'll find that this topic has been discussed many, many, times.
 

crys20

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Oh my gosh. Do a search, you'll find 10,000 threads on this topic.

There's no difference except that DOs take an additional class in their first two years of medical school called OMT which is a technique that most rarely if ever use. Over half of DOs are in primary care but there are lots of OB-GYNs, EM, and DO surgeons and specialists.

And once you get into your residency one isn't "more prestigious" than the other, they're the same, make the same $$. Patients won't know the difference. And your colleagues will respect you, MD or DO if you're a good doctor...If you're not, they won't and your degree won't matter.

Yes, DO schools are a little easier to get into than MD schools. I will be applying this year to them, along with MD schools with a 3.5/30 because I just want to be a doctor and the letters after my name realyl don't matter that much to me. Alot of people don't like the idea of that, though and pursue the MD degree wholeheartedly. DO schools are a great option I think, if anything they've given me the confidence that I probably will be going somewhere next year.
 

Blue Scrub

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MD, DO.....both doctors who get to treat patients....that's what you want to do right?
 
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Smittyballz

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Blue Scrub said:
MD, DO.....both doctors who get to treat patients....that's what you want to do right?
Yes that is exactly what I want to do. :)
 

Law2Doc

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Blue Scrub said:
MD, DO.....both doctors who get to treat patients....that's what you want to do right?
Assuming the OP was in earnest and not a troll, I would clarify the above response a bit. (This is based on my relatively uninformed knowledge, having only pursued the allo side of things, so people who know the osteo side better should feel free to correct me.) DOs and MDs are today essentially equivalent in terms of what they are allowed to do, and largely work side by side in the same residencies, and are indistiguishable to patients. This was not always the case, and as recently as the mid-1980s osteopaths couldn't pursue the same residency positions. Thus for older folk in the medical profession, there may be a historical bias. Additionally, DOs tend to have not had as good a track record in getting into the most competitive and surgical residencies as those in allo. This might be due to that historical bias (eg. surgery is largely an old boys club of allo males), or it might be due to the fact that lower stats are required to get into DO school in the first place. Thus if you have the stats to get into a competitive allo school and you want to go into one of the more competitive residencies, you are probably better off in allo. If you are interested in a field which is considered a less competitive residency (Emergency medicine seems popular with DOs based on this board), it probably doesn't make a difference.
 

medanthgirl

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yup - family medicine also seems to be a popular option for DOs. But i know two DOs - one is chief of an ER in south carolina, and the other is chief of breast imaging in NC, not too shaby! one might even prefer DO for a philosophical reason, i've heard that DOs tend to be more holistic, but not in a new agey wierd way, but in a logical, comprehensive way. either one sounds cool!
 

Chisel

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:) Let me preface this by saying that I am an MSIII at PCOM. And that I may have a little bias. However, I will try to approach this subject fairly.

To say that DO's are not as competitive when applying for residency positions is an absolutely false statement.

Why do I say this?

First, DO's learn the same exact Pharm, Path, Boichem, etc. that everyone in medical school learns. Correct me here if I'm wrong.

Second, we learn to take a medical history and do the physical exam exactly the same way (allowing for some variation that exists from Professor to Prefessor - MD or DO). Again, let me know if this is wrong.

Third, DO's learn OMT in addition to learning all of the above. And although it may seem simple or "useless" to many of my MD and even DO counterparts, it can be difficult at times (just as all of the other subjects we are learning). OMT comprehension often involves a great knowledge of Anatomy. (Which actually makes for a good Ortho. Surgeon)

Also, understanding medicine today involves openess to alternative/adjunctive treatments. Open this week's "Time". The article on Pain management. COX-2's are in trouble. Opiods must be used with caution across all ages. It is our responsibilty as physicians to be open to alternatives.

Finally, let me say this......
Take this fictitous applicant....let's call him Andrew (just for fun)....GPA 3.4/MCAT 29 -went to a solid private University- with tons of medical experience, research published, etc. - a good candidate. He applies to SomeCOM and to Allopathic University. He is accepted at both institutions and decides to go to SomeCOM. He excels while there. Involves himself in the community, aces the COMLEX, and is in the top 10 in the class.

Can anyone say that he would have less of a chance at getting a residency because he went to SomeCOM?

Now let's look at the flip side.

Bill. He's an excellent candidate 3.75/35, experience, research, etc. He does just average while at Allo. Univ. Average on the USMLE.

Can anyone say that he would have an easier time finding a residency because he went to Allopathic Univ?

Basically what I am trying to say is that for some reason there is the feeling in the Allopathic world that somehow DO students/physicians are less smart. When in reality we may have lesser stats coming in but we all learn the same information.

Just some food for thought.

Chisel
PCOM MSIII.5

P.S. - "can't we all just get along?" (Stepping down from soap box now.)
:D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D
 

Law2Doc

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Chisel said:
:) Let me preface this by saying that I am an MSIII at PCOM. And that I may have a little bias. However, I will try to approach this subject fairly.

To say that DO's are not as competitive when applying for residency positions is an absolutely false statement.

Why do I say this?

First, DO's learn the same exact Pharm, Path, Boichem, etc. that everyone in medical school learns. Correct me here if I'm wrong.

Second, we learn to take a medical history and do the physical exam exactly the same way (allowing for some variation that exists from Professor to Prefessor - MD or DO). Again, let me know if this is wrong.

Third, DO's learn OMT in addition to learning all of the above. And although it may seem simple or "useless" to many of my MD and even DO counterparts, it can be difficult at times (just as all of the other subjects we are learning). OMT comprehension often involves a great knowledge of Anatomy. (Which actually makes for a good Ortho. Surgeon)

Also, understanding medicine today involves openess to alternative/adjunctive treatments. Open this week's "Time". The article on Pain management. COX-2's are in trouble. Opiods must be used with caution across all ages. It is our responsibilty as physicians to be open to alternatives.

Finally, let me say this......
Take this fictitous applicant....let's call him Andrew (just for fun)....GPA 3.4/MCAT 29 -went to a solid private University- with tons of medical experience, research published, etc. - a good candidate. He applies to SomeCOM and to Allopathic University. He is accepted at both institutions and decides to go to SomeCOM. He excels while there. Involves himself in the community, aces the COMLEX, and is in the top 10 in the class.

Can anyone say that he would have less of a chance at getting a residency because he went to SomeCOM?

Now let's look at the flip side.

Bill. He's an excellent candidate 3.75/35, experience, research, etc. He does just average while at Allo. Univ. Average on the USMLE.

Can anyone say that he would have an easier time finding a residency because he went to Allopathic Univ?

Basically what I am trying to say is that for some reason there is the feeling in the Allopathic world that somehow DO students/physicians are less smart. When in reality we may have lesser stats coming in but we all learn the same information.

Just some food for thought.

Chisel
PCOM MSIII.5

P.S. - "can't we all just get along?" (Stepping down from soap box now.)
:D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D

I think your post suggests my previous post said something it didn't. I wasn't looking to bash DOs or trying to say that DOs learn less in osteo school than allos do, or that the best DO student is necessarilly worse than the worse allo -- I'm sure the converse is true. But I was saying that if you look at who gets the most competitive and surgical residencies, the allos seem to have the advantage. It doesn't mean that no DOs will get those (some will), or that all MDs are in better position than DOs to get them -- just that the percentages favor coming from allo if you want to work in those areas.
 

box29

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Law2Doc said:
But I was saying that if you look at who gets the most competitive and surgical residencies, the allos seem to have the advantage. It doesn't mean that no DOs will get those (some will), or that all MDs are in better position than DOs to get them -- just that the percentages favor coming from allo if you want to work in those areas.

Allos inherently have an advantage by having around 125 medical schools and the majority of medical graduates in a year with many many residency slots. On the other hand, there are only 23 osteopathic medical schools (of which 3 are relatively new) with a lot less osteopathic residency slots for DO students - one of the reasons why DO students choose allo residency.

Getting into a competitive residency is competitive even among the allo grads...so what is new?
 

frank51

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Chisel said:
Open this week's "Time". The article on Pain management. COX-2's are in trouble. Opiods must be used with caution across all ages. It is our responsibilty as physicians to be open to alternatives.
That's funny, I was thinking about the same exact thing today, in fact the title of the article is "Holistic Healing". It talks about how some of the top pain clinics in the country use this approach to heal their patients. It's sad to see that despite all this there are still some M.Ds that are biased toward D.Os.
 

redsoxfan

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I don't know if anyone is still following this thread... I thought briefly about DO school. I say briefly, b/c I don't know any DOs to talk to or get recs from, and I am primarily interested in MD/PhD. My 2 biggest concerns with DO (correct me if I am wrong), is 1) you do clinical rotations in small, rural clinics vs teaching hospitals, and 2) it is relatively difficult to secure grants as a practicing DO.