Aug 19, 2019
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Here is my back story:

I went to Seton Hall U for 77 credits, with a total GPA of 2.79
I am now 40 credits into my new university with a GPA of 2.944
Gen Bio I: C+
Ge Bio II: C+ (took a pass (taken during beginning of COVID)
Gen Chem I: C+
Gen Chem II: C
Calculus I: A-
Calculus II: C
Orgo I: A
Orgo II: B
Gen Biochem I: C
Gen Biochem II: C (took a pass (taken during beginning of COVID)
Physics I: C (took a pass (taken during beginning of COVID)
Physics II: C (took a pass (taken during beginning of COVID)

I am graduating this May 2021, and I believe that if I do well enough I can pull my GPA up to a 3.1, maybe even a 3.2. I am taking the GRE this December.
Being a doctor is my dream since I was a kid. I always blamed my shortcomings on the difficulties I have experienced but after a lot of reflecting during the virus, I know that this is what I want and I know that I need to change my habits. I know now that I cannot blame my shortcomings on my "difficult life" because life will always be difficult.
Please someone tell me how I can get into an SMP/medical school, and where I could apply!

Here is where I am applying to for SMP's:
Rutgers
George Washington
Georgetown
Drexel

Here are some science electives that I won't know will count
Plant Science: A
A&P I: B+
A&P II: C-
 

GoPenguinsGo

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Dec 19, 2017
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I think you need an MCAT score to get into an SMP, but I might be wrong. Also, get your GPA above 3.0 before applying to SMP and only take the MCAT once you are scoring above 510 on AAMC practice exams (there are only 4 and are therefore very precious so be careful when using them).
 
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candbgirl

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So you’ll most likely need to do a post bacc and then a SMP. I think you need at least a 3.0 to be accepted to a SMP. Why are you taking the GRE? Why won’t the 3 classes you listed at the end of your post count? The grades certainly will count towards your cGPA and sGPA. As ALL courses taken at any college, uni or High School dual enrollment count. There is no grade replacement. You also will be expected to have the usual ECs. A SMP is high stakes-high rewards. You will be expected to get a 3.7+ GPA in the program, and even then there is no guarantee you will be successful. Have you researched DO schools? DO schools might be a more viable path to becoming a physician for you. Good luck as you move forward, but remember to always have a backup plan.
 
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Aug 19, 2019
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Why medicine. Clearly, BCMP is not your strong suit. There is a distinct difference between dreams and reality. It has been a dream of mine to command a sea wolf nuclear attack sub, but.....

I have to admit that I was really lazy my first three years. There aren’t really any excuses except being lazy. I already shame myself enough so I don’t need it from strangers on the internet. So if you don’t have any advice please move on please.
 
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Mr.Smile12

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I have to admit that I was really lazy my first three years. There aren’t really any excuses except being lazy. I already shame myself enough so I don’t need it from strangers on the internet. So if you don’t have any advice please move on please.
Wait until you get asked by your professors when you want to ask for letters of recommendation. Wait until interviews should they come. These are discussions that happen when people review your application. We aren't trying to shame you but you need to own it more than you have, including the possibility that medicine is outside your reach.
 
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Aug 6, 2020
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Correct me if I'm wrong...but aren't SMPs for those with lower GPAs but high MCATs? I believe the Georgetown SMP accepts students with 3.3 ish GPA and 513 ish MCAT (the Georgetown SMP is also not as reputable as it used to be, as they heavily skew their statistics of total SMP graduates matriculating into med school, to include DO and IMG).

OP, not sure why you're taking the GRE. Is it a backup plan to go into grad school?

If you don't want to spend a couple years doing grade repair, you could apply to podiatry this cycle. Any of the larger schools (Kent, new york, Barry) would take you, but you have a good chance of flunking out as is.
 

candbgirl

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Correct me if I'm wrong...but aren't SMPs for those with lower GPAs but high MCATs? I believe the Georgetown SMP accepts students with 3.3 ish GPA and 513 ish MCAT (the Georgetown SMP is also not as reputable as it used to be, as they heavily skew their statistics of total SMP graduates matriculating into med school, to include DO and IMG).

OP, not sure why you're taking the GRE. Is it a backup plan to go into grad school?

If you don't want to spend a couple years doing grade repair, you could apply to podiatry this cycle. Any of the larger schools (Kent, new york, Barry) would take you, but you have a good chance of flunking out as is.
I asked about the GRE too. But didn’t get an answer. I’m not sure OP is guaranteed a spot in any podiatry school. No MCAT available and a well below 3.0 GPA and who knows about the sGPA.
 
Aug 19, 2019
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I posted the same post to this forum as well as reddit. From when I posted to now, I have thought a lot and have decided that the following may be the best plan:
Take a year or two off after graduation to gather and prepare myself, build up my EC's, and study un-distracted for the MCAT's. Return to school for a DIY post bacc and take some upper level science classes, then apply to an SMP, and hopefully medical school thereafter.
 
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Aug 19, 2019
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Wait until you get asked by your professors when you want to ask for letters of recommendation. Wait until interviews should they come. These are discussions that happen when people review your application. We aren't trying to shame you but you need to own it more than you have, including the possibility that medicine is outside your reach.

I am open to all that everyone is saying, but the comment I was replying to did not offer any constructive criticism I could use, and instead mocked me. I did not appreciate that, but I am extremely appreciative to what everyone else is telling me.
 
Aug 19, 2019
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I asked about the GRE too. But didn’t get an answer. I’m not sure OP is guaranteed a spot in any podiatry school. No MCAT available and a well below 3.0 GPA and who knows about the sGPA.

I had plans to take the GRE because I knew I wasn't ready for the MCAT. All of the SMP I had planned on applying to required the MCAT or the GRE.
 

Mr.Smile12

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I had plans to take the GRE because I knew I wasn't ready for the MCAT. All of the SMP I had planned on applying to required the MCAT or the GRE.

I can understand this as a rationale behind taking the GRE. Ultimately you need to figure out when you want to take your MCAT, and in my opinion, it would be after having established a very strong academic record of grades in upper-level/graduate-level biomedical science coursework (meaning, after completing your SMP). Unless you have MCAT prep as part of your program, don't do it while taking classes. When reviewing an applicant with your trends, we want to see documented, verified grades over an "in progress" coursework, as well as an official MCAT.

That said, podiatry programs can be a little more liberal when it comes to requiring the MCAT. Especially during COVID-19, your application can be reviewed without an MCAT score, but most schools that I know of will require or highly prefer having an official score to receive an offer of admission (for this upcoming cycle).
 
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ValeRx

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I have to admit that I was really lazy my first three years. There aren’t really any excuses except being lazy. I already shame myself enough so I don’t need it from strangers on the internet. So if you don’t have any advice please move on please.

The truth is a tough pill to swallow.
 
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GoPenguinsGo

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I can understand this as a rationale behind taking the GRE. Ultimately you need to figure out when you want to take your MCAT, and in my opinion, it would be after having established a very strong academic record of grades in upper-level/graduate-level biomedical science coursework (meaning, after completing your SMP). Unless you have MCAT prep as part of your program, don't do it while taking classes. When reviewing an applicant with your trends, we want to see documented, verified grades over an "in progress" coursework, as well as an official MCAT.

That said, podiatry programs can be a little more liberal when it comes to requiring the MCAT. Especially during COVID-19, your application can be reviewed without an MCAT score, but most schools that I know of will require or highly prefer having an official score to receive an offer of admission (for this upcoming cycle).
How competitive is a 3.3gpa and 515 MCAT for Podiatry school?

edit; typo
 

Mr.Smile12

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How competitive is a 3.3gpa and 515 MCAT for Podiatry school?

edit; typo

My first warning to you is to understand the differences between allopathic medical training and podiatric medical training (and practice). You will be expected to discuss why you want to go into podiatry, and a lot of schools are filled with disgruntled students who wanted to go to allopathic (or osteopathic) medicine in the first place. You should do your homework about the nine podiatry schools and find out the GPA/MCAT ranges for their cohorts. If you complain about being screened out for "resource management" (the candidate probably doesn't want to go to our school... look at their super high metrics!) in medical admissions, they are especially sensitive in podiatric medical admissions. That will explain why you probably won't ever see a 520+ MCAT candidate in podiatric medicine, nor would you see them be interviewed unless they are clearly dedicated to a career in podiatric medicine.

Go to the Podiatry forums and ask questions.
 

Calizboosted76

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So my GPA was a 2.67 and a 2.97 (cGPA and sGPA respectively) and I was accepted to two osteopathic schools.

HOWEVER, I had to work through undergrad (which took 6 years due to failing multiple classes over my first several years) over full time to help support my family and my last 60 ish credit hours of upper division sciences was a 3.8 GPA and my MCAT was a 506.

You need to really demonstrate that you can handle medical school and as of now you have not done so. You literally said that you were being lazy during the beginning of your undergrad (Which is great that you're taking responsibility for being childish) however you need to prove that you have what it takes.

I would enroll in a DIY post bacc prior to an SMP because you may get accepted to an SMP but if you were to continue to score as you did throughout undergrad then that SMP would be a total mistake.

Good luck and I hope you get on track and you establish a slid upward trend and gain an acceptance. You CAN do it, you just have to want it more than you want anything else.
 
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Aug 2, 2019
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Hey :)

I'm a little late to this party but I'll share my story anyhow; I think that a few of the earlier responses are harsh. Take what I'm saying with a grain of salt, given that I'm not applying this cycle -- that's a whole other story -- but perhaps it'll help a little bit. You sound a lot like me in 2016.

I finished undergrad with a 2.6 cGPA, a small upward trend in my senior year, but not much. My sGPA was even worse. My worst year was my second, where I achieved a whopping D- average. I didn't fail any classes, but I passed by a razor-thin margin. Definitely not medical school material, and I am definitely not proud of my time in undergrad. Like you, I had a whole lot of "life" going on. Some of my horrendous academic records could be attributed to poor decision making (particularly when it came to asking for help), but some of it is also due to some pretty ****ty circumstances.

Medical school was always the dream until my grades started slipping. Then, I decided I'm not "doctor material" or various other forms of putting myself down and putting medicine out of my mind. In the fall of my senior year, I met a new advisor (by chance) who saw some potential in me. This is where things changed for me. The small upward trend (we're talking like 0.2 GPA points) was due to their influence, trying to convince me I could make it if I wanted it enough.

We all have "life" that happens; you're right in your thinking that life will always be challenging, but that doesn't mean you shouldn't be kind to yourself. We all make mistakes, some with longer-lasting consequences than others. The important thing here is that you're learning and are now willing (or so you say) to put in the work to get back on track. If you're serious about wanting to correct your academic record, you're going to need to be seriously disciplined for the next few years. Yes, years. Plural. There is no quick or easy way out of this.

This is how I dug myself out of that very deep hole:

First, self-forgiveness. You need to do some serious soul searching. You need to figure out how determined you are to overcome. If it's an "eh, maybe", you're not going to make it. Save yourself the time and the money (because it's going to take both). You need to be completely committed to this process moving forward. I don't mean in an unhealthy or obsessive way -- you need to make time for yourself too, or else you will burn yourself out -- but I mean you need to be willing to make sacrifices, prioritize your time, and make your reinvention the focus every day. You can't do this if you're beating yourself up over your past. Analyze it, decide where your mistakes were, be realistic about your ability, and move forward. Leave the self-deprecating crap at the door. It won't help you now.

Second, find a good mentor. Someone familiar with the process and someone who is willing to commit to your reinvention journey with you. This makes a huge difference.

Third, find a postbacc program. I find the ones at smaller schools will be more willing to work with you about your previous record than the larger, more prestigious schools. Forget prestige at this point; remember, this is a stepping stone. You need to find a program that is willing to take a chance on you. The postbacc program I applied to was very hesitant to accept me at first -- like, very hesitant -- but they eventually took the leap after some conversations (and convincing). You need to do as many credits as possible here. My postbacc advisor recommended re-taking all sub B science classes (which I did), and then filling any prerequisite gaps. For me, this ended up being around 40 credits, which I took over 12 months (3 full-time semesters). Most people in my program took between 12-24 months of full-time study to complete their postbaccs.

Your first semester here should be your first self-checkpoint: how well are you sticking to your study plans? How disciplined are you being at not allowing yourself to slide back into those bad habits? How is your actual scholastic performance compared to where your believed abilities lie? If you THINK you're an A student before starting this process, but a little life got in the way that prevented you from achieving your full potential, then you should be getting those A's now. If, by contrast, you think you've got 4.0 potential but you're now sitting at B-'s -- definitely still improvement, but a B- average in your postbacc will not get you into medical school. You need to be at peak performance here to prove yourself. At a minimum, you need to be considering what is considered competitive for the next step -- an SMP.

Fourth, if you've finished enough credits under your belt at a strong GPA -- I'll leave it up to you, your advisor, and the competitive GPAs for the programs you've chosen to decide what a strong GPA is -- apply to an SMP. This is actually where my advice differs from what I did. I didn't have many SMP options as I was an international student at the time, so I applied to more traditional MSc programs. SMPs offer distinct advantages over traditional MSc's as they're medical school/professional school focused, whereas a traditional program tends to be research-focused. I was lucky that most students in my program were also premed/med school hopefuls, so there was a strong pre-med advising committee and lots of support. The goal here is to continue your upward GPA trend and continue building your academic record. Remember, you need to prove to medical school committees that you can handle the rigor of medical school, both academically and in stamina. You need to maintain your high level of academic performance.

Three easy steps, right?

Here's where it gets tricky; GPA isn't everything. You also need a strong MCAT to overcome. A strong MCAT being >510 IMO (what's a "strong" MCAT is very subjective though), particularly if you're looking to apply to allopathic schools. Others may disagree and I'll defer to them if that's the case. Exactly when you take the MCAT is ultimately up to you. My postbacc institution offered subsidized MCAT courses through Kaplan -- whether I think it's necessary is another matter -- so I took an MCAT course in my final semester of my postbacc. I didn't end up feeling confident enough to take the MCAT until my second semester of graduate school, almost a year later. I do think the additional coursework and experience in graduate school helped me prepare for the MCAT, and it didn't hurt that I was taking a rigorous biochemistry class at the same time, doing sort of double study duty. The MCAT is a beast of a test that is not to be taken lightly; as others have mentioned, I'd wait to take the actual thing until you've studied and practiced enough to be consistently scoring >510 on all practice materials. As a reinventor, you really need to one and done this test.

Your extracurriculars are also important to develop. My postbacc institution strongly recommended getting a license that allows you to get clinical experience -- EMT, CNA, Phleb, etc. -- as clinical experience is a necessary part of your application. Volunteer if you can. Maybe get some research experience or independent study projects under your belt. Shadow. All of the stuff that pads your resume. Don't let this distract you from your academic goals though. You can always find time to volunteer once your academics have been squared away, but you can't go back and re-do the re-do.


I am now four years post-undergraduate and three years into my reinvention, and finally, I'm at a place where I feel comfortable applying to medical schools. I'm going to apply to both MD and DO in the 2021-2022 cycle, and so we'll see how this journey ends then. It takes so much hard work, but I'm proud of what I've achieved; I definitely didn't think I could do it. I'm happy to provide my profile as an applicant if you feel it'll help you (stats, GPA, etc).

Feel free to reach out if you need anything! Good luck, and I BELIEVE IN YOU :)
 
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Aug 19, 2019
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Hey :)

I'm a little late to this party but I'll share my story anyhow; I think that a few of the earlier responses are harsh. Take what I'm saying with a grain of salt, given that I'm not applying this cycle -- that's a whole other story -- but perhaps it'll help a little bit. You sound a lot like me in 2016.

I finished undergrad with a 2.6 cGPA, a small upward trend in my senior year, but not much. My sGPA was even worse. My worst year was my second, where I achieved a whopping D- average. I didn't fail any classes, but I passed by a razor-thin margin. Definitely not medical school material, and I am definitely not proud of my time in undergrad. Like you, I had a whole lot of "life" going on. Some of my horrendous academic records could be attributed to poor decision making (particularly when it came to asking for help), but some of it is also due to some pretty ****ty circumstances.

Medical school was always the dream until my grades started slipping. Then, I decided I'm not "doctor material" or various other forms of putting myself down and putting medicine out of my mind. In the fall of my senior year, I met a new advisor (by chance) who saw some potential in me. This is where things changed for me. The small upward trend (we're talking like 0.2 GPA points) was due to their influence, trying to convince me I could make it if I wanted it enough.

We all have "life" that happens; you're right in your thinking that life will always be challenging, but that doesn't mean you shouldn't be kind to yourself. We all make mistakes, some with longer-lasting consequences than others. The important thing here is that you're learning and are now willing (or so you say) to put in the work to get back on track. If you're serious about wanting to correct your academic record, you're going to need to be seriously disciplined for the next few years. Yes, years. Plural. There is no quick or easy way out of this.

This is how I dug myself out of that very deep hole:

First, self-forgiveness. You need to do some serious soul searching. You need to figure out how determined you are to overcome. If it's an "eh, maybe", you're not going to make it. Save yourself the time and the money (because it's going to take both). You need to be completely committed to this process moving forward. I don't mean in an unhealthy or obsessive way -- you need to make time for yourself too, or else you will burn yourself out -- but I mean you need to be willing to make sacrifices, prioritize your time, and make your reinvention the focus every day. You can't do this if you're beating yourself up over your past. Analyze it, decide where your mistakes were, be realistic about your ability, and move forward. Leave the self-deprecating crap at the door. It won't help you now.

Second, find a good mentor. Someone familiar with the process and someone who is willing to commit to your reinvention journey with you. This makes a huge difference.

Third, find a postbacc program. I find the ones at smaller schools will be more willing to work with you about your previous record than the larger, more prestigious schools. Forget prestige at this point; remember, this is a stepping stone. You need to find a program that is willing to take a chance on you. The postbacc program I applied to was very hesitant to accept me at first -- like, very hesitant -- but they eventually took the leap after some conversations (and convincing). You need to do as many credits as possible here. My postbacc advisor recommended re-taking all sub B science classes (which I did), and then filling any prerequisite gaps. For me, this ended up being around 40 credits, which I took over 12 months (3 full-time semesters). Most people in my program took between 12-24 months of full-time study to complete their postbaccs.

Your first semester here should be your first self-checkpoint: how well are you sticking to your study plans? How disciplined are you being at not allowing yourself to slide back into those bad habits? How is your actual scholastic performance compared to where your believed abilities lie? If you THINK you're an A student before starting this process, but a little life got in the way that prevented you from achieving your full potential, then you should be getting those A's now. If, by contrast, you think you've got 4.0 potential but you're now sitting at B-'s -- definitely still improvement, but a B- average in your postbacc will not get you into medical school. You need to be at peak performance here to prove yourself. At a minimum, you need to be considering what is considered competitive for the next step -- an SMP.

Fourth, if you've finished enough credits under your belt at a strong GPA -- I'll leave it up to you, your advisor, and the competitive GPAs for the programs you've chosen to decide what a strong GPA is -- apply to an SMP. This is actually where my advice differs from what I did. I didn't have many SMP options as I was an international student at the time, so I applied to more traditional MSc programs. SMPs offer distinct advantages over traditional MSc's as they're medical school/professional school focused, whereas a traditional program tends to be research-focused. I was lucky that most students in my program were also premed/med school hopefuls, so there was a strong pre-med advising committee and lots of support. The goal here is to continue your upward GPA trend and continue building your academic record. Remember, you need to prove to medical school committees that you can handle the rigor of medical school, both academically and in stamina. You need to maintain your high level of academic performance.

Three easy steps, right?

Here's where it gets tricky; GPA isn't everything. You also need a strong MCAT to overcome. A strong MCAT being >510 IMO (what's a "strong" MCAT is very subjective though), particularly if you're looking to apply to allopathic schools. Others may disagree and I'll defer to them if that's the case. Exactly when you take the MCAT is ultimately up to you. My postbacc institution offered subsidized MCAT courses through Kaplan -- whether I think it's necessary is another matter -- so I took an MCAT course in my final semester of my postbacc. I didn't end up feeling confident enough to take the MCAT until my second semester of graduate school, almost a year later. I do think the additional coursework and experience in graduate school helped me prepare for the MCAT, and it didn't hurt that I was taking a rigorous biochemistry class at the same time, doing sort of double study duty. The MCAT is a beast of a test that is not to be taken lightly; as others have mentioned, I'd wait to take the actual thing until you've studied and practiced enough to be consistently scoring >510 on all practice materials. As a reinventor, you really need to one and done this test.

Your extracurriculars are also important to develop. My postbacc institution strongly recommended getting a license that allows you to get clinical experience -- EMT, CNA, Phleb, etc. -- as clinical experience is a necessary part of your application. Volunteer if you can. Maybe get some research experience or independent study projects under your belt. Shadow. All of the stuff that pads your resume. Don't let this distract you from your academic goals though. You can always find time to volunteer once your academics have been squared away, but you can't go back and re-do the re-do.


I am now four years post-undergraduate and three years into my reinvention, and finally, I'm at a place where I feel comfortable applying to medical schools. I'm going to apply to both MD and DO in the 2021-2022 cycle, and so we'll see how this journey ends then. It takes so much hard work, but I'm proud of what I've achieved; I definitely didn't think I could do it. I'm happy to provide my profile as an applicant if you feel it'll help you (stats, GPA, etc).

Feel free to reach out if you need anything! Good luck, and I BELIEVE IN YOU :)

Thank you! Thank you so much for taking your time to share your story and steps to take! I find that people are very quick to tell me to give up but you did not. Thank you so much!
 
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Aug 2, 2019
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Thank you! Thank you so much for taking your time to share your story and steps to take! I find that people are very quick to tell me to give up but you did not. Thank you so much!

Hey, no problem -- everyone needs a little boost now and then :) be realistic with yourself and your expectations though.. those SMP programs you listed are a little lofty to start, IMO.
 
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Jul 9, 2020
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Hey :)

I'm a little late to this party but I'll share my story anyhow; I think that a few of the earlier responses are harsh. Take what I'm saying with a grain of salt, given that I'm not applying this cycle -- that's a whole other story -- but perhaps it'll help a little bit. You sound a lot like me in 2016.

I finished undergrad with a 2.6 cGPA, a small upward trend in my senior year, but not much. My sGPA was even worse. My worst year was my second, where I achieved a whopping D- average. I didn't fail any classes, but I passed by a razor-thin margin. Definitely not medical school material, and I am definitely not proud of my time in undergrad. Like you, I had a whole lot of "life" going on. Some of my horrendous academic records could be attributed to poor decision making (particularly when it came to asking for help), but some of it is also due to some pretty ****ty circumstances.

Medical school was always the dream until my grades started slipping. Then, I decided I'm not "doctor material" or various other forms of putting myself down and putting medicine out of my mind. In the fall of my senior year, I met a new advisor (by chance) who saw some potential in me. This is where things changed for me. The small upward trend (we're talking like 0.2 GPA points) was due to their influence, trying to convince me I could make it if I wanted it enough.

We all have "life" that happens; you're right in your thinking that life will always be challenging, but that doesn't mean you shouldn't be kind to yourself. We all make mistakes, some with longer-lasting consequences than others. The important thing here is that you're learning and are now willing (or so you say) to put in the work to get back on track. If you're serious about wanting to correct your academic record, you're going to need to be seriously disciplined for the next few years. Yes, years. Plural. There is no quick or easy way out of this.

This is how I dug myself out of that very deep hole:

First, self-forgiveness. You need to do some serious soul searching. You need to figure out how determined you are to overcome. If it's an "eh, maybe", you're not going to make it. Save yourself the time and the money (because it's going to take both). You need to be completely committed to this process moving forward. I don't mean in an unhealthy or obsessive way -- you need to make time for yourself too, or else you will burn yourself out -- but I mean you need to be willing to make sacrifices, prioritize your time, and make your reinvention the focus every day. You can't do this if you're beating yourself up over your past. Analyze it, decide where your mistakes were, be realistic about your ability, and move forward. Leave the self-deprecating crap at the door. It won't help you now.

Second, find a good mentor. Someone familiar with the process and someone who is willing to commit to your reinvention journey with you. This makes a huge difference.

Third, find a postbacc program. I find the ones at smaller schools will be more willing to work with you about your previous record than the larger, more prestigious schools. Forget prestige at this point; remember, this is a stepping stone. You need to find a program that is willing to take a chance on you. The postbacc program I applied to was very hesitant to accept me at first -- like, very hesitant -- but they eventually took the leap after some conversations (and convincing). You need to do as many credits as possible here. My postbacc advisor recommended re-taking all sub B science classes (which I did), and then filling any prerequisite gaps. For me, this ended up being around 40 credits, which I took over 12 months (3 full-time semesters). Most people in my program took between 12-24 months of full-time study to complete their postbaccs.

Your first semester here should be your first self-checkpoint: how well are you sticking to your study plans? How disciplined are you being at not allowing yourself to slide back into those bad habits? How is your actual scholastic performance compared to where your believed abilities lie? If you THINK you're an A student before starting this process, but a little life got in the way that prevented you from achieving your full potential, then you should be getting those A's now. If, by contrast, you think you've got 4.0 potential but you're now sitting at B-'s -- definitely still improvement, but a B- average in your postbacc will not get you into medical school. You need to be at peak performance here to prove yourself. At a minimum, you need to be considering what is considered competitive for the next step -- an SMP.

Fourth, if you've finished enough credits under your belt at a strong GPA -- I'll leave it up to you, your advisor, and the competitive GPAs for the programs you've chosen to decide what a strong GPA is -- apply to an SMP. This is actually where my advice differs from what I did. I didn't have many SMP options as I was an international student at the time, so I applied to more traditional MSc programs. SMPs offer distinct advantages over traditional MSc's as they're medical school/professional school focused, whereas a traditional program tends to be research-focused. I was lucky that most students in my program were also premed/med school hopefuls, so there was a strong pre-med advising committee and lots of support. The goal here is to continue your upward GPA trend and continue building your academic record. Remember, you need to prove to medical school committees that you can handle the rigor of medical school, both academically and in stamina. You need to maintain your high level of academic performance.

Three easy steps, right?

Here's where it gets tricky; GPA isn't everything. You also need a strong MCAT to overcome. A strong MCAT being >510 IMO (what's a "strong" MCAT is very subjective though), particularly if you're looking to apply to allopathic schools. Others may disagree and I'll defer to them if that's the case. Exactly when you take the MCAT is ultimately up to you. My postbacc institution offered subsidized MCAT courses through Kaplan -- whether I think it's necessary is another matter -- so I took an MCAT course in my final semester of my postbacc. I didn't end up feeling confident enough to take the MCAT until my second semester of graduate school, almost a year later. I do think the additional coursework and experience in graduate school helped me prepare for the MCAT, and it didn't hurt that I was taking a rigorous biochemistry class at the same time, doing sort of double study duty. The MCAT is a beast of a test that is not to be taken lightly; as others have mentioned, I'd wait to take the actual thing until you've studied and practiced enough to be consistently scoring >510 on all practice materials. As a reinventor, you really need to one and done this test.

Your extracurriculars are also important to develop. My postbacc institution strongly recommended getting a license that allows you to get clinical experience -- EMT, CNA, Phleb, etc. -- as clinical experience is a necessary part of your application. Volunteer if you can. Maybe get some research experience or independent study projects under your belt. Shadow. All of the stuff that pads your resume. Don't let this distract you from your academic goals though. You can always find time to volunteer once your academics have been squared away, but you can't go back and re-do the re-do.


I am now four years post-undergraduate and three years into my reinvention, and finally, I'm at a place where I feel comfortable applying to medical schools. I'm going to apply to both MD and DO in the 2021-2022 cycle, and so we'll see how this journey ends then. It takes so much hard work, but I'm proud of what I've achieved; I definitely didn't think I could do it. I'm happy to provide my profile as an applicant if you feel it'll help you (stats, GPA, etc).

Feel free to reach out if you need anything! Good luck, and I BELIEVE IN YOU :)

This advice is excellent and everything! I graduated from undergrad a few years ago with 2.8 cGPA and 2.6 sGPA. After academic re-invention through an SMP and years of clinical work, I am sitting with multiple MD and DO acceptances.

It is possible, but please - Find your growth and find your happiness in the process. Break down the finish line into multiple smaller goals. It'll be more attainable and less daunting this way. One step at a time. Medical school isn't going anywhere, but make sure you use your time and money fruitfully going forward.

Some of the advice above from other posters may seem testy, but I find that sometimes people forget we have room to grow. There is beauty in that, find it. I will also add - Take your MCAT only once. Make it count. I cannot emphasize this enough, but make sure you take your MCAT exam before or after your SMP, and NOT during. Make sure your practice exams are 3-5 points above your target score. Work on test anxiety if you have it, it's fixable, but it has crippled many students in college.

I am rooting for you!
 
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breezys16

2+ Year Member
Apr 11, 2018
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  1. Pre-Medical
So, it seems like some answers here are not too helpful. You will have a chance, but it really depends on whether you're willing to put in years to strengthening your app. For an SMP you'll need to have a good MCAT (I guess GRE if the programs accept that). If you don't get into any SMPs, you'll likely have to do some DIY postbac classes to raise your uGPA to make you a good candidate for an SMP (assuming you do well on standardized tests). From here on out, you have to treat your grades like there's no room for failure...because there really isn't. To be competitive for medicals schools you'll also need good clinical eperiencience, volunteering, etc etc but yeah hope that helps
 
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