SolNiger

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I just came across something that really shocked me as I was hoping to do MD in the caribbean and then practise in Ontario. Is there anyone here who can corroborate this information with their experiences?

http://www.caribbeanmedicine.com/openletter.htm

It is a fact that of all the IMG's that come to Canada, 90-95% will not obtain a residency. The few that do, do so, after either years and years of trying, or, because they know people in high places who 'pull strings' for them.

Just visit www.carms.ca and see how few IMG's get a residency in Canadian match every year. There are currently 12,000 (twelve thousand) IMG's in Canada, actively seeking a residency position. In Ontario alone, there are currently over 4000 (four thousand) foreign doctors with no job and no residency.

Then you have all this talk about being able to get a residency in Canada 'outside the match'. Where? How? Don't just hear that and think that your set, you must have facts! The only ones that will be able to take advantage of this are those with some serious 'inside' connections. Their rumors, and hearsay are bogus, and we all know it. I definitely won't plan out my medical career based on the 'doors will open up' theory. Because quite frankly in Canada they never will, definitely not for graduates of foreign medical schools.

Across Canada there are thousands and thousands of desperate foreign trained doctors. Some of them are outright Canadian Citizens! Of those select few that actually complete all the requirements needed just to apply, only 10% will obtain a residency position (it has varied between 4% and 16% over the past 12 years). Also, those residency positions are the worst, left over ones, that NO Canadian medical graduate wanted.

Verification: www.carms.ca/jsp/main.jsp?path=../content/statistics/report/re_2006#table33

Keep in mind that CaRMS only lists the number of IMG's in the 'match'. You can only enter a rank order list and be in the match if you receive at least one interview. There are hundreds of IMG's that apply but never get any interviews and thus are not in the match, but these IMG's are not included in the statistics! So the actual 'match rate' is even lower than 10% if you were to include ALL the applicants. Please read the CMA interpretation here: www.CaribbeanMedicine.com/article18.pdf

In the Canadian Residency Match, 93% of all residency positions in Canada are filled by graduates of Canadian medical schools. The only residencies available to IMG's are those left over 2 year rural Family Practice spots, that NO Canadian medical graduate wanted. In Canada, Family Practice is only a 2 year program, in the United States it is a 3 year program. So in Canada you are getting basically 2/3 of the educational time you would compared to the U.S. Also, many of those left over FP spots in the second iteration are rural spots, so if you did get one, your opportunity to learn is very limited, because of the small patient population.

It amazes me that highly qualified foreign medical graduates, allow the Canadian medical system to degrade and humiliate them like this. IMG’s, have some pride! Do not let CaRMS, MCC, OIMGP and other Canadian medical organizations rip you off of your hard earned dollars. Because in the end, in Canada, you will have lost a lot of years and money and will have nothing to show for it, except your used airplane ticket.
Even with a residency in the U.S. the chances of practising in Canada are really, really ridiculously low.

So really, what i'm getting from this is that I should basically forget about coming back to Canada. Which is a shame considering the doctor shortage here and that I like living here.
 

tantrum

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Even with a residency in the U.S. the chances of practising in Canada are really, really ridiculously low.
Matching in a Canadian residency is very difficult coming from a Caribbean school (few made it though).
However, practicing in Canada if you are Board-certified in the US (especially in Family Practice as they have equivalency) is not hard. In some specialty like Internal Medicine or Pediatrics, you might have to do an extra year of training in Canada but it's not very difficult if you really want it.
 
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SolNiger

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tantrum said:
Matching in a Canadian residency is very difficult coming from a Caribbean school (few made it though).
However, practicing in Canada if you are Board-certified in the US (especially in Family Practice as they have equivalency) is not hard. In some specialty like Internal Medicine or Pediatrics, you might have to do an extra year of training in Canada but it's not very difficult if you really want it.
from what I gather it would still be difficult since most US residency programs are a year shorter than canadian programs and thus you are required to do an extra year of a fellowship, which in turn is very difficult to get into. And even then, you get a license to only practise in the northern most regions.

I guess I also want to know if the extreme views in the article are really justified.
 
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tantrum

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rom what I gather it would still be difficult since most US residency programs are a year shorter than canadian programs and thus you are required to do an extra year of a fellowship, which in turn is very difficult to get into. And even then, you get a license to only practise in the northern most regions.
If you talk to some Canadian recruiting firms like CMPS, they will give you some of the regulations which I also got from the RCPC. There is a way to avoid the extra year of fellowship in IM and Peds. If you do a fellowship in the US, they will count those years in addition to your 3 years training (3+3). That was the way I was able to practice there as a diplomate in the US. They will give you 3-5 years to pass their own RCPC diplomate exam after evaluating your training.

Also, the provinces that are friendly to US trained fellows are Newfoundland, Saskatchewan, and Manitoba. You don't necessarily have to go to the most northern areas. Ontario, BC, and Alberta are still difficult place to get a position.

The article has a lot of valid points. But if you really want to practice in Canada for personal reasons, there's a lot of ways you can do it you just have to jump more hoops to get in.
 

oldpro

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Yep this is true, most Canadians who go to the Caribbean do US residencies. Most do not want to work in CANADA either per the Candians I know since they can make way more money in the US and the difficulty their own country gives them. :eek:

Does seem wie for Canada since they have a crises in health care like the US does.
 
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