PM&R Part II Oral Boards Resources

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JBM16BYU

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Hi everyone. As we are approaching the end of this year, the next class will be taking PM&R oral boards this Spring. Have any of you used the following resources:
1. PM&R Recap - Oral Boards
2. PM&R Oral Boards Made Easy
3. Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Oral Board Review (Mayer)

If you have used these resources, what did you think? Which were helpful, which can you skip? Any others I am missing?

I understand that practicing with others is good for a solid study plan. I just want to make sure to have a good solid resource included in that plan too. Thanks!

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Ill answer same as I did last year. My program and many have some cases they use so I would start there for anyone. PMR recap oral boards was somewhat good I felt(their written boards stuff is better). I also used both books even though they seemed a little simple. But no matter what, studying just those books is very low yield without a partner. Find another resident or worse case get a friend/spouse/anyone to simulate the test.

Go online to ABPMR website and watch their videos so you get an idea how they ask the questions and what they are looking for. Have your study partner also watch. Then PRACTICE PRACTICE PRACTICE exactly like if you are getting questioned when actually taking oral boards. Their is no substitute for the feeling of having someone sitting in front of you asking questions and being put on the spot.
 
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Examiner: “Now pretend that you are a pulmonologist from the Horsehead Nebula. Your patient is an orca whale from the moon. He has pulmonary incompatibilities to earth’s oxygen-rich atmosphere, and is experiencing separation anxiety after being enslaved by your communist humanoid civilization. Counsel the patient on interstellar resources available to assist with his transition.”

Me (with a super empathetic and slightly concerned facial expression): “Goodness, I’m sorry to hear about your challenges. I empathize the crap out of your situation. It must be very difficult being separating from your family on a foreign land. Fortunately, the horsehead nebula has excellent resources to help you. First, I would do a medical evaluation including CBC, CXR, PFT, and ABG. Then I’d consider a Bronchoscopy…because Pulmonologist do that a lot. I recommend an outpatient cardiopulmonary rehabilitation program to help your lungs adapt to the Earth’s atmosphere. Next I will refer you to mental health resources for your adjustment disorder.

[examiner stoically and blankly stares at me]

Me: Ehh, oh and I would consult social work for them to assist with your challenging living situation.

[examiner stoically and blankly stares at me]

Me: Call the intergalactic chaplain?

[examiner stoically and blankly stares at me]
 
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Hi,

I started to use PM&R Oral Boards Made Easy(green book) and Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Oral Board Review(purple book) per my program recommendation. Both are good to me.

I was also recommended to use a website to practice: You are being redirected..., looks very well designed, but I haven't started to use it yet.

PM&R Recap was helpful for my written board, but I haven't tried the oral board part.


I am looking for a partner to practice PMR oral board cases, hope to practice once or twice a week from Zoom. If anyone is interested, please send me an email: [email protected] Thank you.
 
Choose an oral boards prep book or two. Practice with partners 2-3 times a week. Interrupt each other and blankly stare at each other regardless of how off base or brilliant the answers are. Randomly have someone join the call and stare at you blankly. Include ddx that would never be practically considered.

Practice in the same context you plan to take the test. Make everything as contextually specific to the 'performance' you are planning. If you miss something in your practice, read that section in your preferred resource again.
 
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Examiner: “Now pretend that you are a pulmonologist from the Horsehead Nebula. Your patient is an orca whale from the moon. He has pulmonary incompatibilities to earth’s oxygen-rich atmosphere, and is experiencing separation anxiety after being enslaved by your communist humanoid civilization. Counsel the patient on interstellar resources available to assist with his transition.”

Me (with a super empathetic and slightly concerned facial expression): “Goodness, I’m sorry to hear about your challenges. I empathize the crap out of your situation. It must be very difficult being separating from your family on a foreign land. Fortunately, the horsehead nebula has excellent resources to help you. First, I would do a medical evaluation including CBC, CXR, PFT, and ABG. Then I’d consider a Bronchoscopy…because Pulmonologist do that a lot. I recommend an outpatient cardiopulmonary rehabilitation program to help your lungs adapt to the Earth’s atmosphere. Next I will refer you to mental health resources for your adjustment disorder.

[examiner stoically and blankly stares at me]

Me: Ehh, oh and I would consult social work for them to assist with your challenging living situation.

[examiner stoically and blankly stares at me]

Me: Call the intergalactic chaplain?

[examiner stoically and blankly stares at me]
This sadly (and hysterically) sums it up.
 
Choose an oral boards prep book or two. Practice with partners 2-3 times a week. Interrupt each other and blankly stare at each other regardless of how off base or brilliant the answers are. Randomly have someone join the call and stare at you blankly. Include ddx that would never be practically considered.

Practice in the same context you plan to take the test. Make everything as contextually specific to the 'performance' you are planning. If you miss something in your practice, read that section in your preferred resource again.

Well isn't this exam still virtual? The staring virtually I'd assume is better than the in person staring no?
 
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