Podiatry vs Nursing

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Podnur

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Hi guys
I really need your advise
I've been accepted to both accelerated nursing and podiatry schools, but I can't make a decision on whether I should go to nursing or podiatry. I have shadowed both professions hence I understand that both of the fields have pros and cons.
Pros and Cons of Podiatry:
+ Being a doctor
+ doing surgeries
+ perspective of opening own practices
+ really liked the hospital environment (but as I understood it is hard to find a position of podiatrist available in a hospital)
- 4 years of school + 3 years of residensy
- being at the same salary range as NP and CRna
- Studying as hard as MDs but at the end DPM with some public prejudice
Pros and Cons of Nursing
+ 15 month for BSN + 2 years for NP
+ Variety of jobs
+ Easier to find a job
- Not being able to help without doctors' supervision
- hard and "dirty"(please no offense)

Please help me
Maybe I am missing something and you can point some other cons and pros for the fields
 

luckyfeet

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There are podiatry accelerated programs? Go with podiatry! CRNA always have to work under anesthesiologists. You'll want more power at the end of the day unless you are okay with ALWAYS being dependent an MD.


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MaxillofacialMN

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You're about to get a Bachelors of Science in Nursing in 15 months? Bravo? I understand you're in an "accelerated" program, but I've never heard of anyone getting a bachelors degree in 15 months.

Even if you are in an accelerated program (I think KSUCPM and NYCPM have them?) you will still need minimally 2 years of undergrad, so you're looking at 6 years, and then three for residency.

Also, it's my understanding that becoming a NP is difficult because everyone and their brother wants to be a NP.

It really comes down to one thing: Do you want an autonomous lifestyle where you are in charge, or are you more comfortable being directed and told what to do.
 

Cozell

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I think you should make your decision with the time it takes being the last reason to choose. Sure time is precious but you will always spend way more time in the profession than you did working to get into the profession so you better pick wisely. And if your considering CRNA you'd better have a 3.5+ GPA and 1000+ GRE I have read that some programs get about 800 Applicants for 40 seats

nurses are a dime a dozen (no offense they are just needed in large quantity) and at some point all these nurses may want a nice raise that raise is NP or CRNA hence the # of applicants but after that your at your peak.

for a Pod that raise is becoming a partner or owning your own practice/Ortho group/land a good hospital spot and that raise yields a much better monetary compensation than RN to CRNA Garunteed.
So just scratch that 2nd - off of podiatry.
 

Cozell

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This residency shortage is improving though right i have heard mixed responses. But podiatry has to have seen the worst of it right?
 

Podnur

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How hard is it to find a job after a residency and what is the whole process of a job search?
Is it just working from office to office begging for clients or is it quite possible to be invited as a partner to some office or clinic.
Also how hard is it to stay working in the hospital right after the residency? How many years of experience would you need to get a job and how many podiatrists are needed in the hospital?
Is it true that with current insurance policies most of DPMs are trying to make as less surgeries as possible?
 

bodpod

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Which pod school did you get into? If you dont mind me asking.
 

MaxillofacialMN

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How hard is it to find a job after a residency and what is the whole process of a job search?
Is it just working from office to office begging for clients or is it quite possible to be invited as a partner to some office or clinic.
Also how hard is it to stay working in the hospital right after the residency? How many years of experience would you need to get a job and how many podiatrists are needed in the hospital?
Is it true that with current insurance policies most of DPMs are trying to make as less surgeries as possible?

The post, is the best. Haha
 

Podnur

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The post, is the best. Haha

What is so funny about my post ? :mad:
These are the questions that holding me from choosing podiatry. All Ive been hearing is that podiatry is insecure and it is hard to find a job. Plus due to insurance policies it became easier for podiatrist to clip nails than do surgery. Is it true ?
I would be glad for any answer provided

Ps: to bodpod: I was accepted to NYCPM
 

MaxillofacialMN

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What is so funny about my post ? :mad:
These are the questions that holding me from choosing podiatry. All Ive been hearing is that podiatry is insecure and it is hard to find a job. 6 Plus due to insurance policies it became easier for podiatrist to clip nails than do surgery. Is it true ?
I would be glad for any answer provided

Alright, I got your back...

1 How hard is it to find a job after a residency and what is the whole process of a job search?
2Is it just working from office to office begging for clients or is it quite possible to be invited as a partner to some office or clinic.
3Also how hard is it to stay working in the hospital right after the residency? 4How many years of experience would you need to get a job and how many podiatrists are needed in the hospital?
5Is it true that with current insurance policies most of DPMs are trying to make as less surgeries as possible?

1. Very easy. You put your name into a hat and someone pulls it out!

2. Yes, you travel from "office to office begging" for patients. You might want to go to a busy street corner and practice your begging skills - this is an essential aspect of a pods job.

3. You'll work a lot less hard than when you were a resident in a hospital, I guarantee it.

4. 5 podiatrists are needed in each hospital. And you need 20 years of podiatry experience before you can practice as a podiatrist.

5. Podiatrists "make" surgeries all the time - it's sorta like making dinner, but with feet. I guarantee you that over half the people in pod school right now would not be there if they didn't want to make surgeries.

6. Yes, at one point, surgeries had less liability than clipping nails, believe it or not. So many podiatrists would nick the diabetics foot creating diabetic wound care necessary. Nowadays, it's the opposite: No bleeding on nail clipping, and for some reason surgery ends with an incision. Those pesky surgeons need to get their act together! So yes, it has "became" more of a liability to do surgery than c&c.
 

SuperFeisty

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I was under the impression from all the schools I visited and all the student ambassadors I spoke with that the residency shortage is the bottom 20% of a school's class competing with the bottom 20% of another school's class.
 

Sig Savant

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People who fail Part 2 boards aren't eligible to get a residency. If you are comparing first time passers to second time passers, then yes.

NYCPM continues to have 100% residency placement. It helps that there are more than 100 residency spots in and around NY. The largest concentration of residencies occurs in NY, where NY alumni operate programs and thus give the inherent advantage. This will help in the first true shortage occurring for 2013. I also suspect that many of the new residencies to open in the next few years will be in and around NY.

Thus, I wouldn't worry too much about the shortage if you are going to NYCPM.
 
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bm2

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I was in the same position as the OP. I completed 3/4 of my accelerated BSN before getting into podiatry school. I chose podiatry over the nursing profession because there will be alot more autonomy, not to mention it will take more years than expected to become a CRNA or NP. Especially if the current presidential administration has thier way. Their "proposed" plan would to make any higher nursing degree NP, CRNA, CNL, etc a doctorate degreee thus adding a year to their schooling. This is to happen 2015ish so it would directly affect anyone in nursing school now. Nursing is a great profession and there are many opportunities for advancement, but I chose to go the more direct terminal degree route.
 

EK18

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Why not finish the BSN before you start/apply to Pod school? Probably not necessary but I figure you were 75% there which is only a few months left to go, no?
 

bm2

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It was a money issue. I could not justify spending $4000 to finish it up, but I really wish I had the resources to do so.
 

Madura

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This reminds me of my dilemma to enter an allopathic or podiatric program. My fear of starting an MD program was to end up in a specialty I didn’t want. I have always been interested in both dermatology and orthopedics, both of which are extremely competitive in the MD realm. I thought why not avoid the competition and combine both specialties applied below the knee?
Your dilemma is different because as an NP you are willingly entering family medicine for the most part, whereas my decision was based on the motive of avoiding this area of medicine. Feel free to correct me if NPs can specialize; from what I have seen, they always work in primary care. The only “specialty” I can think of is CRNA, but you are still under the control of an MD, and I can honestly say that in every podiatric operation I have ever sat in on, the CRNA always looks bored as hell. The MD does the consult, prepares the anesthetic, then reads a book while you sit and watch a monitor. Your education is solid and pay is great, but functionally, you will resemble a tech more than a doctor. Do you want to operate and help people walk, or do you want to sit behind a monitor and watch others do it?
 

SuperFeisty

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It's not that clear cut. If DMU and AZPOD have the highest first time board pass rates out of all the schools do you really think their bottom 20% is equal to or inferior to the bottom feeders at the other schools? Especially when compared to students in the bottom 20%, at the other schools, who failed their boards?

The point I was trying to make was that basically you have to suck at pod school to be worried about not really getting a residency (unless you're boneheaded and only apply for 1 program or something).
 

Ferocity

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This reminds me of my dilemma to enter an allopathic or podiatric program. My fear of starting an MD program was to end up in a specialty I didn’t want. I have always been interested in both dermatology and orthopedics, both of which are extremely competitive in the MD realm. I thought why not avoid the competition and combine both specialties applied below the knee?
Your dilemma is different because as an NP you are willingly entering family medicine for the most part, whereas my decision was based on the motive of avoiding this area of medicine. Feel free to correct me if NPs can specialize; from what I have seen, they always work in primary care. The only “specialty” I can think of is CRNA, but you are still under the control of an MD, and I can honestly say that in every podiatric operation I have ever sat in on, the CRNA always looks bored as hell. The MD does the consult, prepares the anesthetic, then reads a book while you sit and watch a monitor. Your education is solid and pay is great, but functionally, you will resemble a tech more than a doctor. Do you want to operate and help people walk, or do you want to sit behind a monitor and watch others do it?

Bingo. I don't care about making more/less money. I want to feel good about what I'm doing.
 

Podnur

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It was a money issue. I could not justify spending $4000 to finish it up, but I really wish I had the resources to do so.

So, would you choose nursing over podiatry if you had 4000 back in that time?


Could somebody explain me the time line for podiatry
As I understand it is 4 years of school + 3 years of residency
But at what period of time do you take all the license exams? Is it somewhere in between school graduation and residency or is it during the school? In other words do you need to spend extra year after graduation for exam preparation or is it on the 4th year of school?


Is it possible to work part time during the school for at least 10 hours per week ?
 

jellybean2020

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So, would you choose nursing over podiatry if you had 4000 back in that time?


Could somebody explain me the time line for podiatry
As I understand it is 4 years of school + 3 years of residency
But at what period of time do you take all the license exams? Is it somewhere in between school graduation and residency or is it during the school? In other words do you need to spend extra year after graduation for exam preparation or is it on the 4th year of school?


Is it possible to work part time during the school for at least 10 hours per week ?

You take APMLE part 1 between your 2nd and 3rd year of school (generally after your basic science classes end and before your clinical rotations start). You take APMLE part 2 sometime in the spring of your 4th year. You take APMLE part 3 during/after your 1st year of residency. Then after you finish residency, you take your board certification exam usually within your first several years working.

Many pod schools have work-study options (ie. watch a desk in the computer lab, etc) where there's a lot of downtime and you can read while you're there. But otherwise it's not recommended and will take precious time away from your studies. And no matter how good you are at time management and efficiency, by the time your clinical years come around you will not be able to work another job because you'll be in the hospital all day.
 

RockFoot

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I heard some dmu guys got jobs valet parking at a country club cause they had so much free time...

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PADPM

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I once considered the CRNA route as well. All I saw was $$$$ signs. CRNAs make more money than most podiatrists will see in their lifetime. It's probably the best profession in healthcare. You don't have to go through the rigors of medical school but you get comparable pay. There are PLENTY of accelerated nursing programs around that allow students to get their BSN. Getting a BSN in 15 months is pretty much standard for these programs.

The one caveat of going CRNA is once you get your BSN then you have to work in an acute care setting for at least 1-2 years. Acute care setting positions are usually not available and you have to wait your turn to get into one. So basically you would be working as a nurse in another area of care until you get your shot. How long could that be? A year, two years, three years???? Who knows. There is a lot of uncertainty there.

Then there is the application/ admission process...podiatry wishes it's own application/admission process was so competitive. Plenty of other bright students who see $$$$ trying to get the coveted CRNA position.

CRNA route: 2+ years for BSN, 1-3 years of regular nursing work before an acute care setting position opens up, 1-2 years of accumulated experience in acute care setting....THEN you get to apply for the highly competitive CRNA spots at schools.

When you put that all together you realize that podiatry sounds a lot more appealing and even though there is a residency shortage still going on within the profession...it's even the safer choice.


Sorry, but I don't agree with the highlighted/underlined statement. I believe that statement is very inaccurate.

To the original OP, becoming a DPM or becoming an RN in my opinion is like comparing apples to oranges. You have to decide what you want to accomplish, you have to have goals, and most importantly you have to decide what you actually want to DO on a daily basis when you are finished your training.

Just like a great residency or position isn't a guarantee for a DPM, similarly, obtaining your RN degree is not a guarantee you will become an NP or CRNA.

If you really don't know which route to choose when comparing an RN degree with a DPM degree, then you're really not ready to do either, since both professions differ so drastically.
 

rusny

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Your education is solid and pay is great, but functionally, you will resemble a tech more than a doctor. Do you want to operate and help people walk, or do you want to sit behind a monitor and watch others do it?

What is so bad in watching behind the monitors? Plus CRna do not always have doctors' supervision. So they do get some action.
While being young you want some actions in the OR yet with time you would understand that all the fuss about surgeries (at least for podiatrists)is not worth it.
You will have to pay bills and it is much easier to chip and clip nails then do bunions.
 

frankcfromny

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Just another opinion for the OP regarding CRNA and podiatry.

The first thing I would do is shadow a podiatrist and CRNA. See what you like about both and which you are more attracted to, even if by a tiny amount.

Then consider the following, and the other great advice that has already been offered in this thread.

My mother is a nurse in a pretty large doctor's office that does many small surgical procedures in house. The doctor there employs a CRNA and I actually spoke with her on more than one occasion. She gave me some pretty good insight regarding the CRNA process-even though I was never seriously considering it.

Her first piece of advice was this. If you can't see yourself being a RN for the rest of your life then you have no business trying to become a CRNA. She says that becoming a CRNA is an uncertain and volatile process and is usually achieved only by those who love being a RN, but want more. The CRNA program admission criteria is extremely demanding, and it can sometimes take even the brightest applicant several years before he/she is accepted into a CRNA program. Not only are the GPA and GRE requirements high, but clinical experience plays a huge role in determining admittance.

This is exactly why I ruled out becoming a CRNA long ago. I could NEVER, EVER deal with being a RN should I be denied entry to CRNA school. It does not appeal to me in the least bit, which is funny because I am an EMT-B and I love patient care. I feel like nurses perform monotonous tasks that involve making the patient feel comfortable rather than actually diagnosing the patient. Although an EMT's scope of practice is a joke, and certification significantly less than that of a nurse, an EMT still makes important decisions/assessments when he/she arrives on scene. I feel like any kind of nurse, especially a regular RN, never really gets to make many decisions when it comes to a patient. *Patiently awaiting someone to argue that point with me*

However, she told me that there is talk of many CRNA programs becoming 3-4 year doctorate programs.

Anyways, I think that if you have a strong desire to enter the nursing field with the goal of becoming a CRNA then you should by all means go for it. It is a great "gig". In fact, one doctor told me he likes the CRNA field better than podiatry.

I think that there is obviously much more autonomy and self-satisfaction in becoming a podiatrist, and the process is much more streamlined.

Good luck!
 

flyhi

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The above poster has said most of what I was going to.

RN/CRNA vs DPM is vastly different, so decide if you want to be a doctor or nurse first. Be advised that becoming a CRNA is no guarantee and if you are so lucky to gain admittance to a BSN program, could take a loooong time to get there. If you actually gain a CRNA spot, then you WILL be successful as a podiatrist, which will ultimately be more lucrative than being a CRNA.

If you really want to be a CRNA, but not a nurse, become an AA (Anesthesiologist Assistant), which is a CRNA without becoming a nurse first. It is extraordinarily competitive and I believe may require the MCAT. However, once you are accepted you are in, unlike nursing.

I'm a bit perplexed by the CRNA vs. Podiatry question because I see them as two totally different careers....Dr. vs. Nurse. Period. Decide if you want to be a doctor or nurse and then go from there. Btw, getting into an accelerated nursing program is MUCH more difficult than pod school. Why? Because everyone wants the 'quick fix' and you don't have to have the 'real' science classes (physics, gen/organic chem) to apply. AND, I believe getting a quality nursing job is WAY more difficult than getting a job as a podiatrist. Podiatry is booming, whereas nursing is becoming saturated. Just ask some recent nursing grads from whatever school you are contemplating. There are many recent grads sitting on the street.

Good Luck
 

flyhi

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Hi guys
I really need your advise
I've been accepted to both accelerated nursing and podiatry schools, but I can't make a decision on whether I should go to nursing or podiatry. I have shadowed both professions hence I understand that both of the fields have pros and cons.
Pros and Cons of Podiatry:
+ Being a doctor YES
+ doing surgeries YES
+ perspective of opening own practices YES
+ really liked the hospital environment (but as I understood it is hard to find a position of podiatrist available in a hospital) don't think this is very true...
- 4 years of school + 3 years of residensy Yes. Residency is paid :D
- being at the same salary range as NP and CRna NO. Not even close. You are looking at the top end of NP/CRNA to the bottom of Podiatrist. Being a Pod brings much more opportunity
- Studying as hard as MDs but at the end DPM with some public prejudice Wha?? Sorry, but nursing classes do NOT equate to DPM. If you want more of a correlation, go PA, not nursing
Pros and Cons of Nursing
+ 15 month for BSN + 2 years for NP IF you get into NP school. HIGHLY competitive with every other nurse that wants more $$
+ Variety of jobs Same holds true with pod...sub-specialties (wound care, sports med, radiology, dermatology)
+ Easier to find a job Disagree wholeheartedly
- Not being able to help without doctors' supervision Yes you can. Depends on the state
- hard and "dirty"(please no offense)

Please help me
Maybe I am missing something and you can point some other cons and pros for the fields
 

Madura

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The above poster has said most of what I was going to.

If you really want to be a CRNA, but not a nurse, become an AA (Anesthesiologist Assistant), which is a CRNA without becoming a nurse first. It is extraordinarily competitive and I believe may require the MCAT. However, once you are accepted you are in, unlike nursing.

Keep in mind that AAs are only allowed to be employed in a handful of states. Many people have probably not even considered this option b/c their state does not have a program/cannot get hired in that state. This makes it even more competitive in the states that do allow them, and obviously decreases the flexibility and job security. I wouldn't recommend it being that it is so new and not yet widely accepted.
 

RockFoot

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Keep in mind that AAs are only allowed to be employed in a handful of states. Many people have probably not even considered this option b/c their state does not have a program/cannot get hired in that state. This makes it even more competitive in the states that do allow them, and obviously decreases the flexibility and job security. I wouldn't recommend it being that it is so new and not yet widely accepted.

While it is less common and is not as widely accepted, AAs have been around just as long as CRNAs. The difference is the size and strength of their respective lobbies.
 

mrjbb

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Hi guys
- Studying as hard as MDs but at the end DPM with some public prejudice Wha?? Sorry, but nursing classes do NOT equate to DPM. If you want more of a correlation, go PA, not nursing

No, I'd like to think of it as you study as hard as a DPM and end up with a DPM...If you're worried about "public prejudice" or the public perceiving you as an inferior to MD/DO then just become a nurse...at least you wont have to "prove" or justify the initials after your name. By the way, how do you think people who have no idea what a CRNA is perceive it to be? My guess is a glorified RN.

Similar to PA's, most people that have no clue about this career will equate them to simple assistants (which by far they're not). If we're going to play the initial's after your name game why not call it how it is.

A couple of years ago (I started a thread on it) a caribbean school or company was feeding on DO's who had an inferiority complex, they offered any DO the ability to take some type of short course and graduate with an MD...thus they would have an MD and a DO degree. Even though they were only LEGALLY able to practice with the DO degree...I'm sure there were a few who took the plunge just to have an (unaccredited) MD initial after their names.

Shadow. And choose a career path you can see yourself practicing in for the rest of your life. Me personally, I would never go into a career banking that in a couple of years I'd be accepted into a more advanced program...there's no guarantees in this life.
 

nlb0101

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OP, I understand your dilemma. I, too have varied interests and could genuinely see myself being a DPM, DO, MD, or even a PA. I initially considered NP as well, though I am currently in an LPN program and it is absolutely ridiculous. Really consider your passion for nursing vs. diagnosing and treating patients, because with NP or CRNA, you will inevitably be a nurse for a while and you need to know you can handle the job. I realize that your nursing program will most likely not be as awful as mine, as it is a BSN program, but you will still be spending a good portion of your time learning to do boring things like ambulating the patient, washing them, etc. Not exactly intellectually stimulating material. Also, I'm assuming you have a bachelor's degree if you've been accepted to an accelerated nursing program. Have you even considered PA? Also, from what I've heard, CRNAs on average don't make much more than DPMs, if any. If you're that concerned with making extra money, why not become a MD/DO?
 

Temperature101

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hi guys
i really need your advise
i've been accepted to both accelerated nursing and podiatry schools, but i can't make a decision on whether i should go to nursing or podiatry. I have shadowed both professions hence i understand that both of the fields have pros and cons.
Pros and cons of podiatry:
+ being a doctor
+ doing surgeries
+ perspective of opening own practices
+ really liked the hospital environment (but as i understood it is hard to find a position of podiatrist available in a hospital)
- 4 years of school + 3 years of residensy
- being at the same salary range as np and crna
- studying as hard as mds but at the end dpm with some public prejudice
pros and cons of nursing
+ 15 month for bsn + 2 years for np
+ variety of jobs
+ easier to find a job
- not being able to help without doctors' supervision
- hard and "dirty"(please no offense)

please help me
maybe i am missing something and you can point some other cons and pros for the fields
this is a no brainer... Go pod
 

pacpod

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If you are still in the debate I would strongly caution making a rash decision either way. This is your career you are talking about.

I would advise spending time in extended shadowing or even seeing if you can get a job helping out in a podiatrist's office and shadowing more surgeries. It might stink pushing applications off another year but that is much better than going down a path (an expensive one up front) that you might find out isn't for you.

I ended up working in an office for several months after shadowing him to make sure it was what I wanted to do and it really secured the decision for me.
 
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