Practicing without Board Certification

Discussion in 'Military Medicine' started by USUHSboardFail, Aug 15, 2015.

  1. USUHSboardFail

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2015
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    I recently talked to this Navy Doc at Walter Reed, and he informed me that one can still practice for up to 10 years in the military without being board certified - since they are badly hurting for docs. He said just don't worry too much about passing or not, just get through your fellowship and then practice for 10 years or so. By then, you will be tasked with administrative and political stuff anyway. Stay in militarymed and u can retired. Be glad you're in.

    Is this true? Don't worry too much about the board result?
     
  2. Gastrapathy

    Gastrapathy no longer apathetic
    Physician Lifetime Donor Verified Account 10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2007
    Messages:
    4,665
    Likes Received:
    3,628
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    You won't make O5 but you can be the Chief of the Medical Corps (in fairness, that person eventually passed).
     
  3. haujun

    10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2002
    Messages:
    525
    Likes Received:
    18
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    your base pay is significant lower than civilian docs...why would you increase that gap even more by not passing board certification exam? It does not make sense to me...It is not too difficult to pass.
     
    j4pac and HighPriest like this.
  4. Chonal Atresia

    10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2008
    Messages:
    328
    Likes Received:
    115
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    Troll...
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
  5. ishii123

    ishii123 Member
    10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2005
    Messages:
    78
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    Gastrapathy...Are you talking about the current Navy Chief of the Medical Corps? Or someone who held this position in the past?

    This is juicy gossip ;)
     
  6. narcusprince

    narcusprince Rough Rider
    15+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2003
    Messages:
    1,402
    Likes Received:
    554
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    I will say in my specialty you will be viewed by the leadership as inferior to your board certified collegues. Everyone will know your not board certified. Even though I firmly believe board certification does not impact practice you should strive to be on the same level as collegues. The .mil should not be viewed as a hideout from board certification.
     
    Shikima likes this.
  7. psychbender

    psychbender Cynical Member
    Physician 10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2005
    Messages:
    1,985
    Likes Received:
    810
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    I had a colleague that finished residency back in the days of lifetime certification, yet never bothered to get certified, as the Army didn't make it a requirement. He stayed in for retirement, but wasn't ready to fully retire from practice, and can't find a job, as he's not board certified, nor even board eligible any longer. Avoiding board certification is a bad idea in today's world.
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
    HighPriest likes this.
  8. Doctor4Life1769

    Doctor4Life1769 **tr0llin, ridin dirty**
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2008
    Messages:
    34,260
    Likes Received:
    901
    Status:
    Resident [Any Field]
    Lol.
    All he/she needed to do was pass a test for a lifetime certification and didn't bother?
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
  9. RustBeltOnc

    2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2014
    Messages:
    296
    Likes Received:
    136
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    I echo all this with respect to the civilian world. Hospital systems / hospitals are increasingly notorious for requiring board certification (at least the initial certification) in part as a mechanism for marginalizing the old timers who didn't take the exam. (in whatever specialty, usually IM).
     
  10. pgg

    pgg Laugh at me, will they?
    Moderator Physician Faculty 10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2005
    Messages:
    11,618
    Likes Received:
    6,765
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    The military kinda sorta encourages board certification. O5 promotion may favor the board certified people. And over time, variable special pay goes down, while board certification pay goes up. It's a laughably small amount but over time the non-board certified people get paid a little bit less.

    However, with the pending consolidation of special pays, with the stated intent to pay all physicians in the same specialty the same amount, it appears even that small incentive is on the cusp of disappearing.

    In the civilian world, non board cert people exist and practice, often in remote underserved places where they're happy to have any warm body with a non-suspended license. The military absorbs those marginal people into desk jobs, which shifts the hazard from patients to the service itself.

    People who can't or don't pass their boards are not a military unique phenomenon.
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
  11. statusspasmaticus

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2015
    Messages:
    17
    Likes Received:
    1
    Status:
    Fellow [Any Field]
    Is there anywhere to find more info on this pending consolidation?
     
  12. pgg

    pgg Laugh at me, will they?
    Moderator Physician Faculty 10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2005
    Messages:
    11,618
    Likes Received:
    6,765
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    Not much. Just one slide in a recently emailed PPT:

    The accompanying email clarified a little:
    It's vaguely non-specific. I don't think anybody really has any idea how it'll all settle out.
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
  13. Gastrapathy

    Gastrapathy no longer apathetic
    Physician Lifetime Donor Verified Account 10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2007
    Messages:
    4,665
    Likes Received:
    3,628
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    Pure speculation: I predict this will be good for primary care and bad for subspecialists without a clear wartime role. GI already had a gigantic pay gap (low ISP with high outside comp). Bet this doesn't help.
     
  14. pgg

    pgg Laugh at me, will they?
    Moderator Physician Faculty 10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2005
    Messages:
    11,618
    Likes Received:
    6,765
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    I will speculate that pay raises across the board are not coming. :)

    The Navy is presently infatuated with this "med home" fad so money and retention efforts in that direction seem likely. Primary care is the darling of US healthcare now. Hopefully the military won't forget that occasionally we go fight wars and need those overpaid surgical specialties.

    I have one more MSP renegotiation next July to take me to retirement so I'm cautiously optimistic that I will escape screwage from these changes.
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
  15. jabreal00

    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2009
    Messages:
    591
    Likes Received:
    98
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    This strategy is utter non-sense. Passing the specialty board is not hard. Sure there are no immediate repercussions in the military but promoting up to 05 will be difficult. Most civilian jobs to include locums require board certification.
     

Share This Page