HooahDOc

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Jun 23, 2003
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I'm an adult and pediatric psychiatrist. I would like to know what texts/books you PharmD guys would recommend to better my understanding of psychopharm. I get the impression our typical texts and references omit quite a few details, or aren't, "in depth" enough for my liking; this is particularly true for CNS stimulants. Any texts/references you guys would recommend?
 

RxVampire

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Oct 12, 2015
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Goodman & Gilmans (now 12th Ed.) has a really in depth CNS section; it's more science-y though....having wicked receptor affinity charts for CNS meds (domestic and international). Unfortunately, not too in depth on off-label use; I generally fill in the gaps with Lexicomp off-label & clinical pharmacology.

Got the look into Stahl's
 
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HooahDOc

HooahDOc

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Jun 23, 2003
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Stahl's essential psychopharmacology is one of my favorite references, would highly recommend.
Thanks. I have an older edition of Stahl's, but I haven't looked at it since residency. I will have to go back and check it out again to see if it has what I'm looking for. I see so much variability in the response and tolerability of what I prescribe, especially the CNS stimulants, and it bugs me that I don't have a great explanation, other than what I can reason out in my head.
 
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CUpharmD2013

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Mar 20, 2010
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Thanks. I have an older edition of Stahl's, but I haven't looked at it since residency. I will have to go back and check it out again to see if it has what I'm looking for. I see so much variability in the response and tolerability of what I prescribe, especially the CNS stimulants, and it bugs me that I don't have a great explanation, other than what I can reason out in my head.
I wouldn't be surprised if genetics play some part in this variability. Hopefully as the field of pharmacogenomics expands, you may be able to get more in depth answers as to what is going on.
 

lord999

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I recommend Stahl's firmly over Goodman and Gilman. G&G's coverage is very, very traditional and has a East Coast mentality in this area (if you follow the literature, there are still strong fundamental disagreements on representative models which G&G buries). The one that I wish was more recently updated, but the one that I was given for graduate introduction, was Schatzberg APA textbook (it's likely to be in your hospital's medical library and pass over the manual) as it went into some of the stronger details about the downsides and the problems with the current therapeutics uses particularly refractive therapy and has really good coverage of older medications (it's the best book for knowing the pre-atypical era drugs). I still have the APA 2002 book on my shelf to consult when we have a schizophrenic refractive to clozapine or someone that we can't figure out why their blood chemistries are so screwed up. The Goldberg is also handy when you're trying to troubleshoot therapy matters, but is less strong than Stahl or Schatzberg for underpinnings.
 
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