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Regionalism

Discussion in 'Radiology' started by DontHaveACowMan, Apr 16, 2007.

  1. DontHaveACowMan

    DontHaveACowMan 2+ Year Member

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    Sep 26, 2006
    I've heard that it is very hard to match outside your home program's region.

    What if you're from the south (born, raised, high school, college, spouse from south as well), however, for some reason went to med school in the midwest, but want to go back south for residency?

    Will doing aways let programs know you're serious about their program? Phone calls or letters?

    Or is my southern background enough to get me back below the M-D line?
     
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  3. pj367

    pj367 Junior Member 5+ Year Member

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    Feb 17, 2006
    this year's match showed that regionalism is very important in determining where you go. I was able to match at a program that is not in the same region as my med school, but I let them know I had a lot of family near the program. I am the only person in my incoming class who was not from instate or a border state. Chances are I would not have ended up there were it not for having family nearby.

    here is why regionalism is important. PD's feel residents are more likely to be happy, hard working contributors if they have a support structure in place (close family or many friends). they fear residents without any such support network are more likely to either transfer out or be malignant (not saying all are, just more likely to be that way). make the program feel that you have family nearby or a good support structure and they are more likely to consider you even if you came from a med school outside the region. the closer the family is in relation to you the better. "my 2nd cousin lives 2 hours away" may not even get you an interview. having your grandmother show you around the hospital before the interview (because that is where her doctors all practice) will make a MUUUUCH stronger statement.

    also, if you are going back to the the same state where you graduated HS and/or college and they probably won't care that you came from an out of state med school.
     
  4. hans19

    hans19 I'm back... Moderator Emeritus 5+ Year Member

    929
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    Jun 9, 2004
    Agree with above. Even so, its easiest for an 'outsider' to get into the South and Midwest (unless its Chicago) than the west coast or east coast.

    If the rest of your application is up to snuff, I wouldn't worry too much about matching in the South.
     
  5. Yachtclub

    Yachtclub Best Advice: Bring Donuts 2+ Year Member

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    Jan 17, 2007
    ATL
    I agree. Duke, Emory, Vandy, and Wake (for Rads at least) are super easy to match into... better to aim high for somewhere competitive like Harlem hospital or Hackensack regional
     
  6. DontHaveACowMan

    DontHaveACowMan 2+ Year Member

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    Sep 26, 2006
    Of course Hans was talking in a general sense.

    Thanks for the responses guys.
     
  7. Yachtclub

    Yachtclub Best Advice: Bring Donuts 2+ Year Member

    32
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    Jan 17, 2007
    ATL
    Yeah, I know...

    It's just been one of those super sarcastic days
     
  8. hans19

    hans19 I'm back... Moderator Emeritus 5+ Year Member

    929
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    Jun 9, 2004
    No, But MGH, UCSF, Stanford, Cornell, NYU ARE tougher to match into than any of those you have mentioned.

    Best,
    Hans
     
  9. DrBravesgirl

    DrBravesgirl Surgeon for a year 7+ Year Member

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    Jun 4, 2002
    chicago
    Regionalism isn't as important as you might think. I go to a non-top 10-but-still-well-regarded medical school in the South (after having lived nearly all of my life in the South, as well as having gone to undergrad in the South), and I will be doing Rads in Chicago. Of course, when I interviewed at programs in Chicago, I was sure to tell them about how I have a lot of extended family in the area, and how my now-fiance is working in Chicago for the forseeable future. If you let them know you have ties to the area and a built-in support system there, you shouldn't have a problem at all. I remember everyone telling me before the interviewing process started that I would find it difficult to get out of the South, but I didn't find that to be true at all (obviously).
     

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