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Research and Residency

Discussion in 'Medical Students - MD' started by rsprabhu, Mar 21, 2004.

  1. rsprabhu

    rsprabhu New Member

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    Hey Guys,
    I just wanted to know how important it is to do research during medical school, such as between years 1 and 2. I have heard two different views where one person told me that if you do any kind of research you can check off that box on the matching form and what you actually did doesn't really matter. Another person said that it is becoming really important especially for more competitive residencies.
    Maybe some of you can help clear this up.

    Thanks
    RS
     
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  3. HiddenTruth

    HiddenTruth Senior Member
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    Research is almost an essential today for any of the most competetive residencies. It is not simply about "checking a box". Many programs will ask you about your research experience, and it is almost a necessity to get into the big name schools, especially those that are reseach oriented. A lot of times, it also helps if you do some research in the respected field that you are going into; however, many times programs just want to see whether you were capable of working on a project while managing your academics simultaneously. I think it is utterly imperative that you find a solid mentor who can allow you to gain some experience, and eventually, work on a project that may get published. And who knows, maybe research is somethign you end up liking, and perhaps want to work with it in the future. One thing I do have to say is that don't try to take a month or two month of research elective and try to get something published becuse it will not happen. Those 1-2 month electives might expose you to research but will definately not solidify any interests/experience. I would try to find a mentor and work with him along the course of your basic sciences. Many mentors are very receptive to the flexibility of students and academics is alwyas a priority. Try to get atleast a paper or two published while you are in medical school. And if you do become heavily interested in it, there are awesome 1 yr fellowships and research scholar programs available through NIH and some of the other well known institutions that you can participate in--very highly looked upon. Good luck!
     
  4. Andrew_Doan

    Andrew_Doan Doc, Author, Entrepreneur
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    HiddenTruth knows the facts. Key is competitive programs like research.
     
  5. Dr.Bevo

    Dr.Bevo Senior Member
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    What's hidden truth? If it's a website, can you give a link? Thanks
     
  6. Andrew_Doan

    Andrew_Doan Doc, Author, Entrepreneur
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    Hiddentruth is the post before mine. Look at the name. ;)
     
  7. biffbuddy

    biffbuddy Senior Member
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    what about if you are interested in radiology? what types of research projects/areas can you get into while you are in medical school? I guess my question is, do radiology residencies look heavily upon research as well?
     
  8. zepplinfan

    zepplinfan Senior Member
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  9. Maxip

    Maxip Member
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    An additional question: does the research have to be during your medical school years to be relevant? For example, I completed an MS with a first-name publication... will that aid in my placement or should I still look for additional experience during my med academic years?
     
  10. Andrew_Doan

    Andrew_Doan Doc, Author, Entrepreneur
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    Research doesn't have to be done during medical school to be impressive; however, programs may prefer to see applicants who completed research as medical students. Don't rest on your laurels as a medical student is the motto.

    Also, all residency programs will be impressed with research; although, it may be varying degrees of impact from program to program. Thus, if you're interested in doing something academic during medical school, then it's best to seek an advisor.
     
  11. FOOLSGAME

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    Bump we need more answers!!!!!!!!!!!!
     
  12. vtucci

    vtucci Attending in Emergency Medicine
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    Look at the NRMP's data on research by specialty. The NRMP breaks is out by projects and publications by specialty and how many applicants had that number and matched or did not match. For my chosen field, 100% of applicants with 5 or more matched irrespective of other criteria (grades, step scores etc). The necessity of having a publication will depend on the competitiveness of the specialty and/or the competitiveness of the program/hospital.

    I would recommend to all students to have a paper prior to applying for residency regardless of intended specialty. It helps you think about clinical problems in a different way.

    As far as the type of research, students can get their feet wet with case reports and literature reviews. Once a student is proficient, writing and researching a case report should not take longer than 8-10hours. For a comprehensive literature review, a weekend. You do not need to be involved in some multi-center randomized control trial or some groundbreaking bench research for residency (although if you can, so much the better). The more papers of high quality you can get, the better you will look.

    For projects and mentors, do a pubmed search on the faculty. See who is prolific. There is an old saying that if you want something done, give it to a busy person- find the busy physician who publishes a lot and ask if they have any projects that you can work on them with.
     
  13. richse

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    Are we talking first author publications or any pub?
     
  14. Mr hawkings

    Mr hawkings Senior Member
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    Ok, this is what i have experience in so i will answer this part of your question.
    A case report would typically be a case that you (or someone else, say a preceptor) observed that has some aspect that is different from the typical presentation of whatever disease or condition the pt has. Ie it has to be unique in some way. this does not necesarily have to be ground-breaking. So something like a previoulsy inseen mode of transmision of some disease or a wierd clinical presentation. case reports that involve images (Xrays, MRIs pics etc) usually have a better chance of getting published. Just make sure that the same presentation has not been previously reported.
    So you pick you case and write the report. There are many journals that accept case reports.
    I do have to say that there have been a couple of times when a simple case report has led to new dicoveries in medicine (espcecially in infectious diseases).

    just scan a couple of issues of several journals and you will see the ones that have a section for case reports. new Enland journal of medicine is a good example of one that does but there are tons of lesser journals (including online only journals) that take them as well.

    The same is true for the literature review. Just pick a topic, find all the literature on that topic and tie it all in in one review paper. most journals accept them.
    Saying that you wrote something means nothing unless it is published.
     
  15. ishr

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    bump this is a very important topic...
     
  16. vtucci

    vtucci Attending in Emergency Medicine
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    Okay- be up front with potential mentors in explaining your goals for this collaboration. You may have a different mentor from a co-researcher. When all else fails, contact the department research director for assistance.

    If you want to be first or second author, you should establish expectations as to work product and deadlines early in the relationship. If you can be first author, so much the better. This will depend on the attending and their philosophy and expectation.

    Not all journals will publish a literature review without the name of an author who is an expert in the field. So no matter how good your review, you will likely need to get a senior doc on the byline.

    Case reports can be done anytime. Your mentor should have several cases in mind. Typically the attendings are just too busy to write these up. Also, case reports do not help them with tenure and other objective evals of their work product (it is not original research).

    Your ability to do research will depend on how well you manage your time. I did research between my first and second year, in my second year, in my third year and in my fourth year. Third year is probably the hardest to do but not impossible. Internal Med often has down time as does psych at a number of institutions. 4th year is on the later side because you want a publication(s) before ERAS. Publication can take <18months in some cases.
     
  17. vtucci

    vtucci Attending in Emergency Medicine
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    Any pub is better than no pub. First author is obviously the best. Do your best and learn from the situation.
     
  18. aam53

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    But do research programs/fellowships between your first and second years of medical school look for previous research experience, say in undergrad or between your undergrad and 1st year of medical school? Or is it possible to get in without prior experience? And is there a particular way to go about looking for these programs? Or is it just google search?
     
  19. scrplyr86

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    Should you mention undergraduate research (only published as an abstract for your school's research expo) on residency applications?
     
  20. Mr hawkings

    Mr hawkings Senior Member
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    Probably not going to help but it wont hurt so might as well mention it.
     
  21. justdoit31

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    I will be researching next summer between MSI and MSII- it will not be in the state that I am going to medical school in and the physician has said she feels confident we can get a publication from what I do in the 8 weeks.

    I haven't had any previous lab/clinical research (my undergrad research was an international humanities project) but I have been in contact with this physician for a couple years and she is workng hard to get me into her lab (but I had to have the med student title to get in so I have had to wait).
     
  22. TexasTriathlete

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    Anyone know how publishing a peer review fits in here? I'm helping with one of those this summer.
     
  23. RxnMan

    RxnMan Who, me? A doctor?
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    Please take a look at the research FAQ I wrote (link is in my signature at the bottom of my post). You can also PM me and I can reply in this thread.
     

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