Jun 9, 2020
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Hello!

I am an undergrad student who is considering applying to PA school. I was wondering if it's possible for PAs to do research and/or teach, like MDs can? I have read that it is more common for PAs who also have PhDs to do research, than "just" PAs. Is there anyone here that is a PA that does research or knows PAs that do research and/or teach?

Thank you in advance.
 

Noisewater-TDX

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several PA students that i have rotated with as a med student are getting their doctorates so they can teach. I'm sure that you could do research if you were affiliated with a university. RN's do research and publish. Don't see why a PA could not.
 
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Jun 9, 2020
23
9
Status
Pre-Health (Field Undecided)
several PA students that i have rotated with as a med student are getting their doctorates so they can teach. I'm sure that you could do research if you were affiliated with a university. RN's do research and publish. Don't see why a PA could not.
Thanks for the response! Do you know if the PA students were dual PA/PhD students?
 
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Noisewater-TDX

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Oh okay, I am not familiar with the Doctor of Medical Sciences degree. Do you know if this degree is obtained at the same time as the masters in PA degree, or if it's something that's done afterwards?
Thank you
I believe its like ~2-3 semesters of extra work on top of the Master you get with a PA. I can ask one of the PA students when i see them again in a few weeks.
 
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Apollo1

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Everything I've seen so far says shows that a doctorate for PAs is sequential at best. Many of them require that you already be licensed as a PA before being eligible to enroll. If you want to do research, you should reassess why you want to be a PA.

Be aware that PA education is allopathic-modeled, but doesn't nearly get into the knowledge nit-and-grit that would be expected from a Phd or physician-scientist. Getting a doctorate that is centered on "PA education" is valid IMO (i.e. these individuals are solely educators and don't practice), but I don't think it adds on so much value that it becomes a worthwhile investment. You could argue that it's degree creep to keep pace with the NP lobby.


 
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DizzyJon

PA-C/Doctor of Health Science
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May 18, 2004
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Hello!

I am an undergrad student who is considering applying to PA school. I was wondering if it's possible for PAs to do research and/or teach, like MDs can? I have read that it is more common for PAs who also have PhDs to do research, than "just" PAs. Is there anyone here that is a PA that does research or knows PAs that do research and/or teach?

Thank you in advance.
Yes, PAs can do research and/or teach. If you really want to do research, then I would recommend going the PhD route. I'm not aware of any other combined PA/PHd program other then Wake Forest. It looks like you have to be accepted into the PhD program and then apply, and be accepeted, to the PA program. You don't start the PA program until done with the PhD. There are also PA/MPH and PA/PharmD programs. You can teach without having a doctorate, but now that more PAs are getting doctorates, programs are wanting instructors to have one.

The two most common doctorates PAs get, after attending PA school, is the DHSc and DMSc. The DMSc programs seem to have taken over as the doctorate of choice. I did the DHSc program, because there were not any DMSc programs at the time. DMSc has tracks in clinical, education, or leadership. DHSc has tracks in telehealth, global health, and education. PhD would be the way to go if you really want to do research.
 
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emedpa

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Aug 25, 2001
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A bit late to the party, but just saw this thread. The DMSc is a PA-specific doctorate, essentially the equivalent of a DNP. There are several now. Most can be done in 1-2 years.
A PA with a masters can apply to any number of other types of doctoral programs if they meet the required prereqs. Like DizzyJon( He was in the class after me), I did a DHSc program. The DHSc is open to anyone with a masters coming from a health care background. My class included physicians, nurses, dentists, nutritionists, public health workers, folks doing research at the CDC, FDA, etc.
I did the global health focus and have taught global health ever since for a different program.
 
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