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Resident income?

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - MD' started by Mia, Mar 27, 2007.

  1. Mia

    Mia 2+ Year Member

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    Nov 30, 2006
    Michigan, US
    I searched around a bit for this, but didn't come up with anything. I read that a resident averages $30,000/yr and I was wondering if that was correct? What sort of numbers have you guys heard/seen?
     
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  3. Critical Mass

    Critical Mass Guest

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    Feb 23, 2007
    Typically starts in the low 40's at my house and goes up each year to around the 50 mark. This is fairly typical. Compensation is usually adjusted annually for living costs.
     
  4. NonTradMed

    NonTradMed Perpetual Student 7+ Year Member

    Ditto on the above poster. Low $40's and they go up every year as you go through residency. Fellowships can pay over $60k. Of course, this is to hold you over and is considered a stipend.
     
  5. jsnuka

    jsnuka Senior Member Moderator Emeritus 5+ Year Member

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    May 2, 2006
    Check here and especially here for the information you want.
     
  6. RokChalkJayhawk

    RokChalkJayhawk Muck Fizzou 2+ Year Member

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    Jun 10, 2006
    Here is an idea. I know this is for a general surgery residency in Santa Barbara, CA, but it gives you a decent idea: http://www.sbch.org/

    I can't link to the actual article but click "Residency programs---General Surgery---Salary and benefits."
     
  7. Critical Mass

    Critical Mass Guest

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    Some schools have standard pay across the whole campus for PGY-1, 2, 3, 4, etc. with fellowships often considered just a part of the sequence.

    Also, pay is usually matched well with the region that the school is in. This keeps people from using immediate salary as a recruiting tool.
     
  8. Captain Fantastic

    Captain Fantastic Physician 10+ Year Member

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    Mizzou Med
    Not to hijack the thread, but why shouldn't salary be used as a recruiting tool? Salary is a big factor in recruiting for other industries with the best companies willing to pay up for the best people. It just seems so anticompetitive the way you say it.
     
  9. Droopy Snoopy

    Droopy Snoopy 7+ Year Member

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    The Alamo
    Sometimes it is. An M4 friend of mine interviewed at an OB program that encouraged and paid generously for in-house moonlighting ($1000 a shift, or about $60/hr) for PGY-2's and above. The PD told him it's not uncommon for some residents to pull in closer to $75K than 40K. But most programs recruit using other factors, like call schedule, vacation time, night float, etc.
     
  10. RokChalkJayhawk

    RokChalkJayhawk Muck Fizzou 2+ Year Member

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    Jun 10, 2006
    My M3 won't pay for itself.
     
  11. njbmd

    njbmd Guest Moderator Emeritus 5+ Year Member

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    Gone Walkabout!
    Residents typically start at high 30Ks and get about 2K raise for each PG year. This number may be higher or lower depending on the cost of living in the area that the residency program is located.

    Since residency programs are considered education and not employment, your compensation is not generally negotiable. For example All PGY-1 residents at a particular location would be paid the same regardless of whether they were a Surgical PGY-1 or a Medicine PGY-1.
     
  12. 8744

    8744 Guest

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    The program director no doubt sold used cars before he went to medical school. First of all, the ACGME and your program count moonlighting hours towards your work-hour limit of 80 and your hospital is not about to allow medical sharecropping, that is, residents tending their own tabacky and not the Massa's. That's the real reason a lot of programs don't allow moonlighting anymore, even by their senior residents. ("Because if residents can only work 80 hours, then by God they're going to do it for the low wages we force 'em to take!).

    I am not in OB-Gyn but I know a lot of their residents and they come close to or exceed the limit as a rule leaving no time to moonlight.

    In other words, the Program director is saying that it's not uncommon for his residents to work 35 extra "shifts" a year which, as these these sound like "days" and not shifts, would be almost impossible for most residents even if they wanted to. I know there are some super-human residents out there who can do it but this would be a harsh existence to be sure.

    You probably won't even get 35 complete days off per year (except for vacation) as an intern in any specialty and definitely not in OB-Gyn or surgery.

    You can moonlight a lot in some specialties as a resident (Emergency Medicine, Family Medicine, PM&****ingR, to name a few) where the hours are typically not that bad but OB-Gyn?

    Fuggedabouit.
     
  13. 8744

    8744 Guest

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    Or hadn't you folks realized that despite the rhetoric, medical training is all about the money?

    This is not a bad thing, you understand, it's just that as a resident not only are you the only one in joint who's getting fleeced but you're expected to clap your hands and sing for joy about it too.
     
  14. 8744

    8744 Guest

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    Because they're not so much as hiring you as making you an indentured servant. Thinking of interviewing and the match as the Soul Driver's Circuit.

    Still, you raise a good point. I betcha' if some of the more non-competitive medicine and family medicine programs that end up with open spots every year that either stay open or have to be filled from the bottom of the barrel in the scramble (of the match, actually) offered a better salary they might have a better sot at filling from the top, not the bottom.

    Now, medicine is all about the money, of course, so at some level your hospital doesn't care if its residents come out of Yale or The People's Academy of Healing in Ulan Bator, Mongolia. Still, every open residency spot in a hospital is worth an average of $110,000 from the Feds. The overhead is in place, the hospital might as well try to get the subsidy.
     
  15. Law2Doc

    Law2Doc 5K+ Member Physician Moderator Emeritus 10+ Year Member

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    Agree with Panda on this one. Residents I've seen start at something in the $35-45k range and it goes up a few grand a year. Nobody makes close to $75k on straight salary. There is some moonlighting to be had (and you can always pawn the unconscious patients' watches and jewelry:D ), but don't expect residency to be lucrative years, just living wage years.
     
  16. sirus_virus

    sirus_virus nonsense poster 2+ Year Member

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    I heard it is 6.50/hr. You can get extra cash from moonlighting(the 'moon' part of the word might be right on, seeing as all you are doing really is, pulling down your pants and showing lawyers your ass).
     
  17. Law2Doc

    Law2Doc 5K+ Member Physician Moderator Emeritus 10+ Year Member

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    At the strip bars, women who pull down their pants and show lawyers their goods tend to earn a mint. But you don't see too many residents doing this (I hope).:laugh:
     
  18. Droopy Snoopy

    Droopy Snoopy 7+ Year Member

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    The Alamo
    Yeah I usually refrain from posting 4th-hand information on here, so OP take it for what it's worth. Still, at the time nobody had brought up the whole moonlighting thing and I wanted to mention it. Some specialties are more conducive than others, and location plays a part (if you're at a community program in the middle of nowhere you won't have much opportunity). And some programs are militant about their anti-moonlighting policy, while some give a wink and nod just like they wink at some residents pulling well over their in house 80-hour limit. So anybody know why lower-end programs in lower-end specialties don't give bonuses and such? Wouldn't it be better than not filling your spots year after year (or filling them with people who can't speak English), losing credibility, funding, and eventually the spots themselves?

    As far as the straight pay thing, military residencies pay in the $60K range. The extra 20 grand is in exchange for your soul though.
     

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