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Hey all. I've been a SDN forum stalker for quite a while, and decided to make a post to hopefully get a little bit more perspective on my situation. I'm really looking for a second opinion on where my resume is weak.

I originally had a goal of becoming a CRNA. I'm a very industrious person, so a simple BSN would never have been enough for me; CRNA was the best of nursing and medicine wrapped into one. Medicine was a calling to me, and nursing sounded like the best fit for hands-on procedures and patient interactions. Just as medicine has been a calling, so has the operating room. There is just an allure that I've never felt with any other floor or specialty. I already know how everyone here feels about RN to MD, but I genuinely started my journey to pursue nursing - I would never recommend getting a BSN as pre-reqs for med school. After much consideration, I've decided that medicine is really where I belong, not nursing.

When I started my college career, I was a slack-off and had no clue what I wanted to do in life. My first two semesters were disastrous in terms of GPA. Thankfully, I cut the slack and took a few years off to really think about what I wanted in life. After going back to school, I've maintained a 3.9GPA associates degree, and will earn a 3.94 in my BSN. Everyone talks about how nursing school is a GPA killer, and I've worked my ass off to get the grades. I'm also going to one of the best nursing schools in the nation (inter-professional campus), and it's really no joke. Even after all of that, my first 6 classes from nearly a decade ago are still destroying my overall, and I'm sitting at around a 3.75gpa. How heavily weighted are these extremely old classes?

As far as ECs go, I have a year of TA in math and biology, elected student rep for my council (pushing for president), work as the nursing lead (scheduling, emailing, managing) at a popular volunteer clinic, have around 150 hours of non-clinical volunteering, around 60 hours of MD/PA shadowing, and work part-time through school in the PACU. How important is doing research and/or getting published? I play video games competitively and go to tournaments (and win, hah) when I can - is this important at all to people as "well-rounded"?

I've finished all of my reqs to take the MCAT, which is one beast of an exam. I'm nearly certain that this will determine the fate of my med school applications.

My thoughts:
Is the MCAT all I should really be worrying about? Should I push to get some research in? Do I need more hours in areas? Is my leadership suitable? How much of a disadvantage is it being an RN, and, will committees look past my decade-old classes?

I really appreciate every opinion on this forum. If you have any thoughts on my weak points, I would love to hear them.
 

FutureSurgical

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The MCAT is a gruelling test that should not be taken lightly. It's not impossible, but it took me 5-6 months while working full time to get a 512 (85th percentile.)

Research is nice, but unless you're going for Yale/Harvard/T10 schools, it's not required. Much less publishing in a journal. Also, what do you mean by "well-rounded?" The volunteer hours are going to be your issue assuming you knock the MCAT out of the park. But if you mean "hobbies," then I'd say add more to your application than just gaming. That's just my opinion though.

I wouldnt say being an RN first is an issue. PLENTY of people have been in your shoes and went on to become a successful physician. The thing is you need to give proof as to WHY you wanna switch careers. Start shadowing Primary Care docs. You don't need a ton of hours; just see what they do because that's what many people go into when they graduate.
 
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longhaul3

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I think you are in fine shape if you do well on the mcat. Nobody interviewing you will care that you got some lower grades 6 years ago, but they all have the same weight in your gpa.

Just to clarify—you've taken two semesters each of university-level bio, chem, organic chem, and physics, all with labs? My understanding is that most nursing schools don't require (or even offer) these courses and tend to have a "chemistry for allied health professions" kind of thing. I've heard this issue come up before and actually had a postbac classmate who had gone to a great undergraduate nursing school but had to redo everything.
 
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Ultimax

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It is true that several nursing courses do not meet prerequisite requirement as the courses do not meet graduation requirements for biology and chemistry major.
I am an NP, who left my job in March 2018 to pursue a career in medicine. I had to retake Organic Chemistry, Statistics, Genetics, Physics, Biochemistry, Microbiology. Your experience as an RN will help, and do not worry about courses that you took years ago. Be prepared though as being a nurse does not mean you have a better chance of getting into med school. On the contrary, statistics show that students with nursing degree has one of the lowest chances of getting into med schools in comparison to those with biology and chemistry degrees.
Your MCAT will make or break your application. The average MCAT to get into MD schools are 511 ( around 83-85 percentile) .Your competition as a pro-gamer can be put as hobbies. Research experience and publications help, but not necessarily unless you want top schools. Volunteer activities to help the less privileged are recommended.
 
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The volunteer hours are going to be your issue assuming you knock the MCAT out of the park...Start shadowing Primary Care docs.
Great advice, thank you!

Just to clarify—you've taken two semesters each of university-level bio, chem, organic chem, and physics, all with labs?
That is correct. I have taken all MCAT prereqs. I did this before entering my BSN program, because I just love learning, and thought it would aid me in the future. Many CRNA programs also require these courses.

Your MCAT will make or break your application. The average MCAT to get into MD schools are 511. Volunteer activities to help the less privileged are recommended.
Super glad to hear that. I really would love to focus all of my attention on getting a 518+. Also, the clinic I volunteer at serves the uninsured and incredibly less privileged of my city. I plan on volunteering for at least for 150-200 more hours for non-clinic based opportunities, however.
 

SteyrFWB

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Nurse to medical school does not retract you from doing well going forward.

I remembered vividly that number one graduate from my med school class at UF was a former nurse. She was way ahead of us clinically.

I also remembered a CRNA who wanted to be an anesthesiologist. He went through medical school and anesthesiology residency AFTER working as CRNA. He, again, was way ahead of us little boys and girls in medical school.

It has been 32 years since my Med school graduation. Of course, we little boys and girls have caught up in our careers. But those nurses, to me, they were way, way ahead of everyone else in my medical school years.

Over the years, I had counseled a few nurses who want to apply to medical school. The biggest hurdle is the MCAT. It is hard to work and study for MCAT at the same time. I would recommend any nurse who is applying to medical school, to stop working, and devote a good 4 months to study for MCAT just like any premed would. Once you get a good number on MCAT, being a former nurse does not detract you from doing well in medical school. My anecdotal observation, you will do very well going forward.
 
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Once you get a good number on MCAT, being a former nurse does not detract you from doing well in medical school. My anecdotal observation, you will do very well going forward.
I really appreciate this. Thank you for the encouraging words!
 
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