psyapps

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Hi all,

Anyone on the board have their eye on a career as a school psychologist? This is my latest thought - seems like it could be a decent gig. However, didn't apply to any school psych programs - only general psyd programs.

I haven't researched this depth yet, but does anyone know off hand what it takes to be a school psychologist in most school districts? Would a general psyd degree be a good enough start, or would I require a lot of post doc classes, training and certification since I didn't graduate from a school psych program?

Muchos grac!
 

sunny22

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psyapps said:
Hi all,

Anyone on the board have their eye on a career as a school psychologist? This is my latest thought - seems like it could be a decent gig. However, didn't apply to any school psych programs - only general psyd programs.

I haven't researched this depth yet, but does anyone know off hand what it takes to be a school psychologist in most school districts? Would a general psyd degree be a good enough start, or would I require a lot of post doc classes, training and certification since I didn't graduate from a school psych program?

Muchos grac!
I don't have the answer to the question, but worked at in the student support services department at an elementary school last year, and was a teacher before that. I do not know what the licensure requirements are to work in a school. However, I do know that most people who work in schools only have a masters degree. It would seem to me that a PsyD would be more than enough training, but that is just a guess.

The other thing that I have read alot of recently is that school psychology is the area where professionals are predicting for the most growth over the next 10 years, because there are not too many people entering these programs, etc. So, it doesn't really answer your question, but it is probably a good place to specialize in! If I hear anything, I will definitely pass it on.
 

50960

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With a clinical doctoraate you are way overqualified for the duties of a school psychologist, AND in most places I know of (california) you will still need the PPL (or the like) credential whether you have a MA or doctorate. School psych used to be big, but districts are ditching the concept fast here in Ca, as it is too expensive, and has alot of liability. If a district needs an eval they hire a licensed psychologist; it saves money in the end and it releases the school from any liability regarding the results (low IQ, SED, special ed). Also the big knock for school psych is you are not licensed to do anything independently outside of your 9-5 job with the school. Go for the clinical license, and if you still like the school setting and job duties (testing etc.) then contract with a district. This way you can have other jobs in private work, hospitals etc... whatever interests you. :thumbup:
 

Paendrag

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There are Ph.D. programs in School Psychology (e.g., University of Wisconsin). It is a good field with a stable income on average higher than a clinical psychologist. You cahn practice school psychology with a masters degree, eds, or Ph.D. in school psychology. It is a cheaper, quicker alternative to most Psy.D. programs. School psychology has its own licensing board (NASP, http://www.nasponline.org/).
 

50960

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Not in Ca P! Anyhow a license to practice school psych if it exists is not an independent license.

:)
 

Paendrag

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From NASP website on state licensures.

CALIFORNIA

Commission for Teacher Credentialing Certification:

Pupil Personnel Services Credential, Specialization in School Psychology-requires completion of 2 years post-BA in professional program specializing in school psychology, recommendation of program, passing score on CBEST, 450 hours of practicum experience and 1200 clock hours of culminating field experience (internship), at least 800 of which is in a school setting. For applicants trained out-of-state: complete post-BA degree program of at least 60 semester hours, including the practicum. Verify eligibility for the equivalent credential authorization in the state where the program was completed.

Board of Psychology Licensure:

Registered Psychological Assistant- requires master's degree from accredited institution. Can engage in limited activities under the supervision of a licensed psychologist.

Licensed Educational Psychologist-requires a master's degree in school psychology, three years full-time experience as a credentialed school psychologist in the public schools (can include 1 year of internship). This allows private practice.

Psychologist-requires doctoral degree, 3000 hours supervised experience (at least 1500 post-doctoral, with 1 hour supervision by licensed psychologist per week), and passing score of 500 on EPPP.

Registered Psychologist-must work in a non-profit that receives at least 25% of funding from government; requires doctoral degree, 1500 hour internship, and 1 hour per week of face-to-face supervision by a licensed psychologist.

Scope of Practice and Title Protection for School Psychologists:

Holding a specialization in school psychology enables the holder to "provide services that enhance academic performance, design strategies and programs to address problems of adjustment, consult with other educators and parents on issues of social development and behavioral and academic difficulties, conduct psycho-educational assessment for purposes of identifying special needs, provide psychological counseling for individuals, groups and families, and coordinate intervention strategies for management of individuals and schoolwide crises."

Private practice is allowed for those holding a LEP license.

Government employees and employees of accredited or approved academic institutions and public schools are exempt from licensure requirements of the psychology board.*
 

LM02

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This isn't a direct reply to the licensing issue (because, honestly, I really don't know anything about it), but I have a friend with a PhD in school psych and she doesn't even work in a school. She works for a private psych consulting firm doing evals and assessments, and (I believe) some family work. So it seems that there is quite a bit of flexibility in practice opportunities.
 

Paendrag

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To sum up. If you get a Ph.D. in School Psychology, you can run a private practice outside of schools. In some states, you can do so with a Masters degree. Academia is a possibility with Ph.D. School Psychology. It is far less competitive than Clinical to get into.