Secondary Essays, Adversity, and Assault

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IWishICouldPhysics

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Hope everyone's doing okay! I've been going back and forth on this, so I figured I'd ask here.

One of my biggest activities (not an MME) is how I'm a volunteer crisis hotline advocate at a rape crisis center; I've been doing it for nearly 650-700 hours for 3 years, and I discuss it in my secondaries as the reason why I'm interested in women's health and trauma-informed care. The crux of the matter is that, in my adversity essays, I speak about how the reason I got involved with it was due to an abusive relationship as a young teenager (14-15); hotlines like the national sexual assault hotline and DV hotline did wonders for me, so I wanted to pay it forward. I make it clear that I was young (quite literally say "as a young teenager), and I spend maybe a few hundred characters speaking about the actual relationship; the rest is about how I've grown and taken my struggles and turned them into advocacy for others, even when it's difficult, learning resilience, trauma-informed communication, etc.

I'm proud of the essay, but I've gotten mixed advice about keeping it, along the lines of "med school's will see you as weak/damaged goods/[insert here]." Anyway, I'd be curious to hear what you wise people have to say the whole thing, since I'm unsure about keeping it. It's an authentic essay, everyone who's read it has said it's strong and not overly graphic, and it's my greatest adversity but I also don't wanna shoot myself in the foot and cast myself in a bad light; I also don't have any other big traumas (I've got it pretty good, thankfully), other than a "semester from hell" where several friends and a grandparent passed away in rapid succession (but I use that for other essays). Any advice is welcomed :)

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This sounds like an excellent essay. We like applicants who have learned and grown from adverse experiences; it shows maturity and resilience.
 
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Hope everyone's doing okay! I've been going back and forth on this, so I figured I'd ask here.

One of my biggest activities (not an MME) is how I'm a volunteer crisis hotline advocate at a rape crisis center; I've been doing it for nearly 650-700 hours for 3 years, and I discuss it in my secondaries as the reason why I'm interested in women's health and trauma-informed care. The crux of the matter is that, in my adversity essays, I speak about how the reason I got involved with it was due to an abusive relationship as a young teenager (14-15); hotlines like the national sexual assault hotline and DV hotline did wonders for me, so I wanted to pay it forward. I make it clear that I was young (quite literally say "as a young teenager), and I spend maybe a few hundred characters speaking about the actual relationship; the rest is about how I've grown and taken my struggles and turned them into advocacy for others, even when it's difficult, learning resilience, trauma-informed communication, etc.

I'm proud of the essay, but I've gotten mixed advice about keeping it, along the lines of "med school's will see you as weak/damaged goods/[insert here]." Anyway, I'd be curious to hear what you wise people have to say the whole thing, since I'm unsure about keeping it. It's an authentic essay, everyone who's read it has said it's strong and not overly graphic, and it's my greatest adversity but I also don't wanna shoot myself in the foot and cast myself in a bad light; I also don't have any other big traumas (I've got it pretty good, thankfully), other than a "semester from hell" where several friends and a grandparent passed away in rapid succession (but I use that for other essays). Any advice is welcomed :)
This sounds like an excellent essay to me. You seem to have healed, moved on, and grown from the experience. That's the essence of resilience, a highly valued quality. It seems like you are focused more on the scar than the scab or wound, and that's where the essay's focus should be.
 
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Anyone who assigns blame or shame to victims of sexual assault needs to know/learn about the facts/statistics. Just not in your essays. :)
Couldn’t agree more with you on that first point 😁, for people in general (though I am biased, in all fairness). And rest assured, no plans to soapbox about stats in my essays
 
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